suspended :( - page 3

by stethoscope21

6,989 Views | 28 Comments

Last week, my 2 coworkers and I got a med error because we did not give the coumadin, we assumed that because the mar was flipped, it means that it was discontinued. I felt really stupid because that is very important. Then,... Read More


  1. 0
    We all make mistakes. Some more than others, some say they dont, some dont want to admit it, some just keep making mistakes over and over again and make no amends to find out why they are doing it. If Nursing is truly what you want maybe its a good idea to get away from the type of nursing you are doing. It may be telling you that somewhere else there is another nursing career perfect for you. I have TRIED ON PURPOSE to get out of LTC. I have had it for 18 years. I dont care for it anymore. Not because I made alot of mistakes, not because of the patients, its because of the system we all work in. Too many patients, too much paperwork, too much stress, not enough good auxillary help. Plus I have injured myself numerous times over the years lifting, pushing, pulling, standing long periods of time. But....as with anyone...If you truley want to stay where you are, you like the staff you are with, the patients and your job, by all means dont give up. I would keep trying to improve myself and seek out others who can help you the most. If your heart is in your work, be more careful. Always picture yourself being in that bed, or a friend or family member. Always double check if you are not sure. ASK ASK ASK the Nurse Manager, The Supervisor, this will provide you with a backup. I never trusted any nurse I followed on my shift. I always made sure. I reminded them of things that werent done or overlooked. Keep a small journal on your patients yourself. Never mind report.....you cannot trust that at times cause I KNOW through experience that when I came in the next day, the things I had put on report never came back to me or where just written off as nothing. Keep it for yourself. Its a pain, I know, but this has helped me greatly.....once one nurse Called me a name......Super Nurse.....I somehow took it as a compliment but then I took it as jealousy because I got things done. Hope this helped.
  2. 0
    It's normal to make mistakes How will you learn...Oh wait are you already a nurse. congratz keep going....
  3. 0
    Quote from OnlybyHisgraceRN
    Even if he/she does have ADD does it mean that he/she can not be a competent/safe nurse?
    I guess I missed the part where morte said, or even suggested that.
  4. 0
    I know it's unavoidable sometimes, but I try not to get interrupted. You want your meds first "just because"? NOPE. I start at the beginning and go to the end. SOMEONE'S got to be last. It's not because I don't care, or because I'm mean, it's because the more you guys jibberjabber and hang on to my cart, the more errors I'm going to make.

    Coumadin I'm picky with. I've gotten to the point where if I notice a change, I go check the chart. WHO flipped the MAR though? I'd say that one's not all your fault.

    *edit* Lumbarpain, your font gives me a headache.
  5. 0
    According to your story I probably would not have suspended you, but instead filled out a med error paper and in-serviced you. The only thing I can think of is that because the family caught your potential error and complained you were suspended. You would not believe the errors that I see on a weekly basis as a supervisor. Most nurses are in-serviced on the error. As long as the error did not cause injury then I take the error as a learning opportunity. If I suspended every nurse that made an error I would have no nurses working right now.
  6. 1
    In my place of work we wear aprons with administering drugs do not disturb. The apron is red with yellow writing can't be missed families doctors and other members of staff know not to talk to nurses wearing these aprons
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  7. 0
    i would second morte's suggestion that you be tested for add. i don't suggest it as a former psych nurse, but
    rather as the wife of a man who has been diagnosed with add, adhd, and ocd. anxiety also is part of the package. he has earned two phds and has won several awards and honors. he has written several books, had a play published and produced. he is fluent in several languages and has won four research grants. he teaches on
    the college level and he's the one students stay in touch with decades later.

    i'm not bragging so much as i'm just trying to reassure you that a diagnosis of add is not the end of the world
    or a great disgrace. it just is. it's as much a part of him as his bald spot.

    he is really scattered and is the archetypal absentminded professor! i make sure his backpack is packed with everything he needs. in fact, he has a mwf backpack and a tth backpack (different colors) and meds have really made a difference in his ability to concentrate and think.

    i don't the bon will want to get involved if no lasting harm happened. families can be real pains sometimes.
    use this as a wake up call and don't let it become a permanent trauma. in fact, agonizing over something far
    too long can be another part of the package. dust yourself off, get tested, and begin all over again. you'll be
    great! with experience, comes confidence.
  8. 1
    thanks!
    Quote from sharpeimom
    i would second morte's suggestion that you be tested for add. i don't suggest it as a former psych nurse, but
    rather as the wife of a man who has been diagnosed with add, adhd, and ocd. anxiety also is part of the package. he has earned two phds and has won several awards and honors. he has written several books, had a play published and produced. he is fluent in several languages and has won four research grants. he teaches on
    the college level and he's the one students stay in touch with decades later.

    i'm not bragging so much as i'm just trying to reassure you that a diagnosis of add is not the end of the world
    or a great disgrace. it just is. it's as much a part of him as his bald spot.

    he is really scattered and is the archetypal absentminded professor! i make sure his backpack is packed with everything he needs. in fact, he has a mwf backpack and a tth backpack (different colors) and meds have really made a difference in his ability to concentrate and think.

    i don't the bon will want to get involved if no lasting harm happened. families can be real pains sometimes.
    use this as a wake up call and don't let it become a permanent trauma. in fact, agonizing over something far
    too long can be another part of the package. dust yourself off, get tested, and begin all over again. you'll be
    great! with experience, comes confidence.
    sharpeimom likes this.
  9. 0
    Even where coumadin is given one day extra, if the INR comes back okay, then there is no harm to the patient and you should be OK. It's when that action can be connected to any "problem" that you have to worry more... basically if there could be "actual harm" or "damages" arising from your negligence in the legal sense, then you can bet the facility will be scrambling to hang it all on your neck, and preventing you from saying that their shoddy or confusing systems or records were a contributing factor (they may redo all of the binders nicely or stop flipping pages and using other forms, etc.)


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