LTC RN supervisor job?? - page 2

I am interviewing for a RN supervisor position in a LTC facility. Years ago as an LPN instructor, I was in a LTC facility with my students. But I have never actually been employed at a LTC facility. ... Read More

  1. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from nightmare
    What's the difference betwen medicare and medicaid?
    Medicare is insurance for people over the age of 65. Medicaid is welfare for people under 65 who can't (or won't) work and get medical insurance. In the LTC setting, Medicaid will not pay for physical or occupational therapy and depending on how much help the patient needs, doesn't pay very much per day to take care of the patient.
  2. by   pepperann35
    Is anyone a LTC supervisor that is an LPN? I work in a 103 bed LTC/skilled care facility. I work 8p-6a Tues-Fri. I make base pay of 17$ per hour plus an extra $1 per hour for being supervisor. I supervise LPN's, RN's and CNA's. I fill in quite frequently on whichever unit is without a nurse at night, I handle many of the admissions and check over most of them also. I am on-call every 8 weeks. I have 18 years experience as an LPN. Looking to compare salary and job descriptions. Seriously considering going back to work as a weekend floor nurse which pays better because of the every weekend differential and I like working weekends better than weekdays. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  3. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from pepperann35
    Is anyone a LTC supervisor that is an LPN? I work in a 103 bed LTC/skilled care facility. I work 8p-6a Tues-Fri. I make base pay of 17$ per hour plus an extra $1 per hour for being supervisor. I supervise LPN's, RN's and CNA's. I fill in quite frequently on whichever unit is without a nurse at night, I handle many of the admissions and check over most of them also. I am on-call every 8 weeks. I have 18 years experience as an LPN. Looking to compare salary and job descriptions. Seriously considering going back to work as a weekend floor nurse which pays better because of the every weekend differential and I like working weekends better than weekdays. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    We had an LPN who acted as supervisor but because of the Nurse Practice Act in Massachusetts, LPNs CAN NOT supervise RNs so he was called the 'coordinator'. For a so called supervisor, your pay seems low.
  4. by   pepperann35
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    We had an LPN who acted as supervisor but because of the Nurse Practice Act in Massachusetts, LPNs CAN NOT supervise RNs so he was called the 'coordinator'. For a so called supervisor, your pay seems low.
    Hey,thanks for the reply. We only have a few RN's that work nights. We all get along pretty well. I am a supervisor and the RN/LPN thing has never been an issue. There is not difference here in what an RN or LPN can do in LTC. :spin: It is different in the hospitals. I don't have anyone to discuss salary and job responsibilities with, since there does not seem to be many LPN's acting as supervisor. Thanks again!
  5. by   DeDe054
    Here in Illinois, my ADON is an LPN. She functions just as I do when I am out of the facility. She is paid $20.00. We share the paperwork duties, on call, and generally split all other work duties in LTC. If she were an RN her salary would be more.
  6. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from DeDe054
    Here in Illinois, my ADON is an LPN. She functions just as I do when I am out of the facility. She is paid $20.00. We share the paperwork duties, on call, and generally split all other work duties in LTC. If she were an RN her salary would be more.
    So she does the work but doesn't get the pay. I know a lot of RNs who would resent working under an LPN.
  7. by   pepperann35
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    So she does the work but doesn't get the pay. I know a lot of RNs who would resent working under an LPN.
    I have 18 years experience in LTC nursing. We all know that we learn much of what we know on-the-job. As a supervisor, I utilize the knowledge of all of my staff nurses. We have nurses that have worked in tele, ICU and hospice. One of the RN's is great at starting IV's, which I am not, for example. I feel very confident as a supervisor and am glad I work with nurses with experience I can learn from also. In LTC, at least here in FL, there is not much difference in what RN's/LPN's can do. It really is not an issue. I would advise any RN that has a problem with an LPN as a supervisor, without giving any thought to the experience the LPN might have, to get over it already. The title does not really mean anything to me, it is just what I do if that makes any sense and I do not feel that I work "above" anybody. We are a team with different responsibilities, thats all. Right now, I am just considering returning a floor nurse, which pays a little more. Wish I didn't have to worry about money.
  8. by   DeDe054
    Yes, she does the work, and does a great job. But she also reaps the benefits, not docked when she takes time off, no weekends. She is very Knowledgable and clinically sound, I must say more so than some RN's I have come across. If the RN's don't want to work under her they can always work somewhere else. I , like some, do not believe an RN makes a great nurse. I believe it is whatever you are exposed to, character and personal ethics that make the nurse, not the degree. I have come across some LPN's that know more and work harder than any RN I have met. I am not one to make the distinction between RN and LPN. A nurse is a nurse.
  9. by   pepperann35
    Quote from DeDe054
    Yes, she does the work, and does a great job. But she also reaps the benefits, not docked when she takes time off, no weekends. She is very Knowledgable and clinically sound, I must say more so than some RN's I have come across. If the RN's don't want to work under her they can always work somewhere else. I , like some, do not believe an RN makes a great nurse. I believe it is whatever you are exposed to, character and personal ethics that make the nurse, not the degree. I have come across some LPN's that know more and work harder than any RN I have met. I am not one to make the distinction between RN and LPN. A nurse is a nurse.
    Well said!
  10. by   jjjoy
    Unless an RN has been an LPN, it IS confusing to RNs what LPNs are and aren't qualified to do. So an RN might understandably, though incorrectly, initially be uncomfortable with an LPN supervising them in LTC.

close