Long-Term Care Nursing: A Specialty In Its Own Right - page 2

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

Long-term care nursing is a specialty that involves helping patients who need extended care as they deal with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Long-term care nurses coordinate the care of patients, perform nursing skills, ... Read More


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    I may be in the minority, but I WANT to work in LTC. I was a physical therapist tech at a nursing home and there is nothing better than seeing a CVA come in who can hardly move and watch him literally walk out the door and shake your hand. He was SO PROUD of himself too! It's just INCREDIBLE!!!

    I'm still taking pre-reqs right now, but my plan is to work in LTC.
    1feistymama and duckyluck111 like this.
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    I am a new CNA graduate with plans to get my LPN and possibly ny RN. When we did our clinicals, they were at LTC and Assisted Living Centers. I learned more at the LTC facility than the ALC in that I worked in the "mental" unit. Maybe it was the staff at the ALC that turned me off to ALC, I don't know. The staff at the LTC actually tested me as if I was taking my state boards. I found it very helpful to work with the RN's there and actually made me consider LTC for my employment after getting my license.
  3. 0
    Hello,

    I just graduated from a (LVN) program and I'm really intrested in working in LTC. I really enjoyed my clinicals when I was there.. I take my nclex july 5th. What I want to know is do you have any LTC suggestions? Do know of anyone that will hire a GVN or a new graduate? I would greatly appreicate any advice you could give me. I live in Garland texas area..Thanks!
    Last edit by nursetoi on Jun 23, '12 : Reason: forgot to add some info
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    Long-term care facilities are indeed unique. While I understand that many nurses may justify their attitudes of discrimination by categorizing long-term care nurses as something less desirable, I beg to differ. My grandmother spent the last 6 months of her life in an LTCF, and trust me, it wouldn't have been her cognizant choice. Caring for these people in my opinion is an honor and a privilege. They have lived full, meaningful lives and have earned the right to be treated with respect and dignity. Coordinating the care of these folks has to be challenging, because it requires a nurse's time and attention to know what the norm is for these folk and then to identify when they are in an "off" state to seek the appropriate services to get them back on par. And that does not include the communication with family members. I am sure there are hundreds of aspects to the job that I am not aware. But as an ordinary citizen having seen the stresses and workload that these people handle on a day-to-day basis, I have nothing but the utmost respect for the LTC nurses. My mom is getting up there in age, and luckily is still able to handle her affairs. When it gets to the point that our family can no longer care for her, my wish is that she will be taken care of by a person who not only values themselves and what they do, but also values my mom for the independent strong person she is. I don't believe it is healthy for the RN or the patients if the RN is there because it may be the only job in town at the moment in time. LTC nursing is a calling and is not for everyone, but it does not make it any less important than a job in an ICU or other acute care setting. And for those of you who are LTC nurses and reading this, know that there are us out here who are very thankful for the part you play in this circle of life.
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    Quote from dzeeryp
    And for those of you who are LTC nurses and reading this, know that there are us out here who are very thankful for the part you play in this circle of life.
    Thank you for your wonderful, appreciative post! I've worked in LTC since graduating from school more than six years ago and I feel that it is one of the most underrated areas of nursing practice in existence.

    It should be an honor and a privilege to positively touch the lives of our residents during their final years on this earth.
    1feistymama, prinsessa, and LTCangel like this.
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    Thanks for this article! My first few months of nursing were in acute care. The job didn't work out since I was a new nurse floating around aimlessly in a pool of sharks. They advised me to try long term care. I got a job at a nursing a few weeks later. Last October, my Mom had surgery. I was visiting her in the hospital and my sister told them I was a nurse. They asked me where I worked and I said a nursing home. They gave me that look. I felt hurt but I couldn't change the fact that I worked in long term care and not acute care like those nurses. She said you guys probably don't have phones where the doctors can call you on them at the nursing home. I was like no we don't have them.

    In fact we take turns racing to the desk to grab the phones. Hey at least I get my exercise in! This article boosted my spirits. A nurse is a nurse no matter where they work!:bowingpur
    1feistymama and Isitpossible like this.
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    Quote from smoup
    I may be in the minority, but I WANT to work in LTC. I was a physical therapist tech at a nursing home and there is nothing better than seeing a CVA come in who can hardly move and watch him literally walk out the door and shake your hand. He was SO PROUD of himself too! It's just INCREDIBLE!!!

    I'm still taking pre-reqs right now, but my plan is to work in LTC.
    good for you!
  8. 1
    I worked in LTC for 6 years as an LPN. Then I became an RN and wanted to immediately leave for the more glorious hospital job. Ha! I was an idiot. Yes, I have to do more critical thinking to take care of my hospital patients, but damn if you don't work 10x harder as an LTC nurse. In LTC you have to think about everything, not just current medically critical information. When I hear the hospital RN's talk about leaving to work in the easier LTC, I just think to myself- let them go, they have no clue, and I know half of them wouldn't make it. I still work per diem there and often think about going back full time. I like the continuity of patients, and collaborating mainly with one doctor that is fairly liberal with you once trust is established.
    It is a special place to work that requires very hard working, dedicated nurses to make it all flow.
    adventure780 likes this.
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    We must all appreciate the LTC nurses ....
    An assisted living community is a good choice, but it's not for everyone. I think it's perfect for seniors who are looking to enjoy an independent lifestyle, while also having access to more living support.
    Before choosing any facility, I think it's important to consider the needs and preference of the seniors..
    And no doubt that the nurses are providing their services very passionately..... But i must say that the nurses that are offering their services in the LTC centers are much more appreciated...
    adventure780 likes this.
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    Every time a patient or family member smiles or says a kind word to me I feel like i did something good that day. For all my moody residents who are upset about their current situations, I take it as a challenge to help them adjust to the setting for as long as they will have to be there whether it's long term or short term. My one resident gets upset easily with staff members i try to be patient with her and even when I am behind try to say a few encouraging words before moving on with my med pass.
    1feistymama and rowdy-piper like this.


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