How many verbal warnings before write-ups?

  1. 0
    I am hoping to return to LTC. I haven't worked in LTC in 3 years. I have heard that the place that I am seeking employment at has some lazy and uncooperative CNA's. What is your procedure in regards to verbal warnings and write up's of CNA's? I also heard that some nurses nowadays are filling out incident reports instead of regular write-ups of CNA's. Thanks for any advice.

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  2. 5 Comments...

  3. 2
    Since you've been out of LTC for a few years, and what you've heard is rumor, you would probably be better off focusing on learning how to do the job, and trying, at least initially, to build solid relationships with your co-workers.

    As a new nurse in a facility, it's best not to go in with the idea that you are going to be having problems with anyone. You don't know the politics or the personalities, and you might find yourself in conflict with colleagues that, several months down the road, after getting to know them, you will realize that they are valuable members of your team.

    Prove first that you are a worthwhile addition to the staff, then worry about all the rest.

    You'll have enough to deal with just getting up to speed with the pace and routine and demands of the job. That should keep you busy for a good, long time. And really, try to go in with a positive attitude about your co-workers.
    ElSea and Blackcat99 like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from mazy
    Since you've been out of LTC for a few years, and what you've heard is rumor, you would probably be better off focusing on learning how to do the job, and trying, at least initially, to build solid relationships with your co-workers.

    As a new nurse in a facility, it's best not to go in with the idea that you are going to be having problems with anyone. You don't know the politics or the personalities, and you might find yourself in conflict with colleagues that, several months down the road, after getting to know them, you will realize that they are valuable members of your team.

    Prove first that you are a worthwhile addition to the staff, then worry about all the rest.

    You'll have enough to deal with just getting up to speed with the pace and routine and demands of the job. That should keep you busy for a good, long time. And really, try to go in with a positive attitude about your co-workers.
    Very well said.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
  5. 0
    Yes I hope everything goes well. I talked to a nurse at the grocery store for just a few minutes who works prn at the facility. She said that the DON gets rid of nurses who don't supervise the CNA's properly. I was hoping that someone here would be kind enough to tell me how they supervise their CNA's. I am worried because I am thinking that I will be so busy with meds and treatments that I won't have time to supervise anyone.
  6. 1
    First and foremost protect your residents and protect yourself. I'm a little strict with my CNA's most of the time and they do great work. I love the girls I work with and they know it. I'm fair and have no preferential treatment. Everyone is treated the same. If someone's laziness or uncooperation leads to anything that appears to be neglect or abuse get rid of em. Here's what I do: the first time it is a learning experience and teach them what to do or not to do, the second time for the same incident is a write up, and the third time we march to the time clock and the DON/DSD get to deal with it. I have so much to do and so little time that babysitting staff doesn't rate high on my agenda. If my DON had to remind me to do my med pass or chart or follow up on labs/x-rays/etc how long would I last?
    Blackcat99 likes this.
  7. 1
    Maddock26's post says it all. =) I used to work in a facility in which the DON pretty much expected us to babysit, to always be looking over our aides' shoulders, and she expected us to make a certain amount of write ups; we practically had a quota, kinda like traffic cops. I really detested it; I'm not a babysitter.

    Now I work in a facility in which I stay so, so incredibly busy that I usually do not have time to babysit; fortunately the group of girls that I work with is an AWESOME group; I rarely have to worry about work getting done when these girls are working with me. Occasionally I have to work with other aides, and I don't put up much with residents not getting changed, ice pitchers not getting filled... someone who seems like they are doing much sitting around playing on their phone, I call them out. There's no time for that.

    I've only done one write up so far since I've been there, and that person messed up so bad, they ended up getting suspended and then fired. I of course thought I would be in trouble as well, but I told my DON that I did feel responsible for what happened, and it was left at that. I worked one night with an aide who did seem like she was keeping busy; I saw her answering lights and changing people on one hall. Unfortunately she had another, short hall that she was responsible for, and she left those poor people soaking wet; one fellow was so bad off by the end of the night that his skin was bleeding in places. =(
    Blackcat99 likes this.


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