Was your previous career a failed one? - page 2

I've just completed my prereqs and am about to start an ADN program. But I'm a little scared. I have a BA in Elem Education. After graduating, two years ago, despite having impeccable credentials,... Read More

  1. by   KatieBell
    The Nursing Shortage is not a fallacy- you can simply look at hospital websites and see how many open jobs are posted. However, the shortage is a lot less acute than it was about say 5-6 years ago. I graduated in 2000- and had pretty much my pick of jobs at any of 8 area hospitals. Now, I see less jobs open in these hospitals. However, I am making excellent money working as a traveler- going where I decide I want to for a few months, etc. And travelers are only used when there isn't enough regular staff to "go round" (for a variety of reasons). At this point, I have solid experience under my belt, and have found that I can get hired anywhere I want to go- within reason. I don't get if you feel that Kansas is the armpit of the country why you would need to stay there initially, and why you couldn't head to somewhere where the shortage is very acute (NJ, Texas, some parts of NC).

    As far as sending resumes out for PCT- you will not get much response unless you CALL the recruiters and ask if they have gotten your information, generally it is only after a phone call and personal contact that they start to really pay attention.
  2. by   manofletters
    Thanks for the info Katie. I do see the positions posted, but I thought there might have been 10 applicants for every 1 posted position. I'd love to move, but can't for family reasons. Having experience is everything...that's why I want to get the PCT position so bad.

    About contacting them. I got the recruiters email address from a nurse friend at the hospital, who refered me to them. HR had a general address to send resumes and no contact number. That makes it seem like they don't want to be bothered. Sent the resume three weeks ago. Hadn't heard anything, so emailed her. Should I be calling or do you think an email suffices?
  3. by   KatieBell
    I always call. It is very easy to ignore email, but very hard to ignore someone on the telephone. Are you certified as a Nurses Aide? It really is easy to get this certification (takes maybe 6-8 weeks) if you have not already and it will definitely get you employed. I think we are always more short of good Nurses aides than even good nurses...
  4. by   mom2michael
    Quote from manofletters
    Thanks for the info Katie. I do see the positions posted, but I thought there might have been 10 applicants for every 1 posted position. I'd love to move, but can't for family reasons. Having experience is everything...that's why I want to get the PCT position so bad.

    About contacting them. I got the recruiters email address from a nurse friend at the hospital, who refered me to them. HR had a general address to send resumes and no contact number. That makes it seem like they don't want to be bothered. Sent the resume three weeks ago. Hadn't heard anything, so emailed her. Should I be calling or do you think an email suffices?
    How many semesters have you completed of NS? Some places will require at least 1 semester of school to be completed, some places you have to complete 1 full year of NS or have your PCA license or they won't even let you in the door. So with that being said, have you thought about a Unit Secretary position? Great way to get in the door, learn all about the hospital and usually there are no requirements such as having your PCA or CNA license.

    Don't give up on the PCT, Dec. is here and some of the PCT may be graduating from programs and HR is just not ready yet to fill their positions but will here in the next 2-3 weeks. I got my 1st job in a hospital Dec. 15th of last year and I applied in October. If KC is like all the hospitals further south, they tend to hire in large groups 2-3 times a year rather than several times a month or orientation reasons.

    As far as it being a failed career for you in KC, that is so not true. There are so many hospitals in that area and any time I check out any of their websites I can find 10-20 GN positions available in so many different fields (Children's Mercy is one). You'll have some great opportunities when you graduate from school.

    Start calling HR in places you've applied, find out what you need to do to get your foot in the door. In most hospitals, HR is just a challenge to overcome and get past, but once you do, it's worth it!!!

    Good luck!!!
  5. by   Really An Actress
    Was my previous career a failed one?

    My username says it all.

    (Bittersweet smile. Places hand over face, slightly dejected. Slowly reaches forward to shut off computer. Leans back in chair, stares stage right. CUE LIGHTS).
  6. by   TrickieTam
    Hello and congrats on your journey,
    I started out as a CNA, I'm coming up on 10 years experience next year. I got certified while in high school and had initial plans of continuing on to nursing school. Well, my plans didn't go that way instead I went into Cosmetology. I got my Master Cosmetology license and thought it was the best career choice for me. I was wrong, cause what I really wanted to do was be a nurse and I longed for it. Cosmetology just didn't do it for me. So now, I'm once again in college trying to complete the LPN program. I plan next year to enter into the RN program. What can I say, all I know is healthcare.
  7. by   wonderbee
    PCTs are often directly recruited from nursing programs who are rotating their students through that facility. I got a job as a PCT before my first semester was completed without so much as making a phone call. The facilities want SOME experience for their PCTs... usually completion of one semester of NS that prepares students for PCT duties. It's not a job that you just walk in off the street and start doing so don't let your experience with trying to get a job as a PCT sway you. That aside, I have heard from these boards that the there are some areas in the midwest may not be experiencing a nursing shortage. If you are willing to relocate, I can assure you, you will not have a problem. I'm turning down job offers right and left. I'm in south Florida.
  8. by   BonnieSc
    Even though I know the nursing shortage is real, and I've watched the graduating classes at my school get jobs right after (or before) graduation, I can't help feeling some skepticism, too. I graduated from an excellent liberal arts college at 22, and in the years since, the most I've ever made was $9/hour. Part of this was the areas of the country I was living in, but it was very, very depressing, and I'll never be able to just "assume" there's a job waiting for me, no matter what kind of a shortage there is. I've been burned too many times.

    There're several teachers in my immediate family, and they've ALL had trouble finding jobs. They warned my partner about this before she graduated from a teaching program, but she didn't really believe them because her program kept talking about the need for teachers. So it was depressing for her when she sent out application after application and heard nothing. Luckily, my family was there to tell her there was nothing wrong with that (her family, knowing little about teaching, didn't get it); eventually, she was hired for a position in an economically depressed area. (She hates teaching, but that's another story.)

    Anyway, I'm trying not to worry too much about the future until it's actually time to apply for jobs. I'm only halfway through clinicals in a BSN program.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    My previous career (not the Nurse aide one) was a dead-end career. All the more motivation to do something about it.
  10. by   ortess1971
    I wouldn't call my first career a failed one, although I did get disgruntled and bitter because of some of the hopitals where I worked( I'm a surgical tech). I absolutely love where I work now. It is also difficult here to get a teaching job because my state is small, and things tend to be very political.The teachers unions are also very strong and that means that some of the crappier teachers stay around a lot longer than they should-new teachers rarely get jobs. Thankfully, they are always looking for nurses around here!
  11. by   Annabelle57
    good thread...

    was my previous career a failed one? depends on how you look at it, i guess. i went to school originally to sing classically - even got as far as a conservatory in the great northeast for my master's degree in vocal performance. ah, but as much as i loved to sing (still do) and perform and be a musician, my heart was not 100% in it. for one thing, i cannot stand competition, and it takes a certain type of determined, thick-skinned person to succeed in that arena, to accept rejection after rejection after rejection and hope for a "yes" out of an audition. plus, i really do not like unsteady paychecks, and i hate temping. failed career? well, it never really got off the ground, though it did take leaving my master's program and another 3 years of wondering why i couldn't strongarm myself into loving the idea of a performing career until i realized the kind of strengths i did have and what made me happiest (caring for others).

    if you look at it as a failed career or even a failed career attempt, well then, i am so incredibly glad and grateful that i failed, because i love the path that i am on and the job that comes with it. i just job-shadowed with another rn in a local level iii nicu and thought i was going to burst out of my skin, i was so excited. at the same time, i wouldn't trade those years of music for anything, because i discovered so much about myself, where my heart lies, what makes my heart soar, and where i want and don't want to be.

    by the way, my brother had the worst time trying to get a teaching job here. he was like you: brilliant, great gpa, an impressive student teaching experience, but he couldn't land a job to save his life. he had several friends in the same boat, too, and all the while, our local paper was running headlines like "severe staffing shortage in central florida schools; hundreds of teaching positions vacant". i'm happy to say that he is now teaching intensive reading in a nearby school, but please don't think you were alone in the struggle. seems to be a trend recently.

    also, i work in the recruiting office of a large teaching hospital - i'm not a recruiter, but i'm working as one of the front desk meet-and-greet gals to help everyone out, and the one thing we are told day in and day out is that if an rn walks through our doorway, whether they are fresh out of school and waiting to take boards or an experienced rn or an rn who hasn't worked in ten years... we do not let them leave without getting them to a recruiter. period. we, like pretty much every hospital in this state, are so very desperate for nurses... well, let's just say that if you have any trouble securing a job after graduation (highly doubtful), come here and i will hook you up.
  12. by   INFJ
    I am so feeling your pain! I, too, am 27...I have a Master's degree in Counseling. I graduated with a 3.98 GPA and searched for a job forever and never found one...not a decent one anyway. I have really "secretly" always wanted to do nursing, but was afraid of failing...so I figured with a "failed" career...why not face the fear?!?

    I will graduate with a BSN in May and am finding myself extremely nervous about finding a job. What if the nursing shortage "disappears"? What if I have waited this long to do what I want to do and I can't get into it? I am so ready to have a life and do nursing and be successful that it's sometimes overwhelming. For our sake, I really do believe that our nervousness and apprehension is due to having the feeling that a former career choice kind of blew up in our faces. Forgive me if you do not feel this way...I'm kind of just lumping us together =) Anyway, I hope that is why I feel the way that I do.

    Good luck in the next couple of years!!! =) Hope this has offered some insight that you are not alone!
    Amy
  13. by   Thunderwolf
    Quote from INFJ
    I am so feeling your pain! I, too, am 27...I have a Master's degree in Counseling. I graduated with a 3.98 GPA and searched for a job forever and never found one...not a decent one anyway. I have really "secretly" always wanted to do nursing, but was afraid of failing...so I figured with a "failed" career...why not face the fear?!?

    I will graduate with a BSN in May and am finding myself extremely nervous about finding a job. What if the nursing shortage "disappears"? What if I have waited this long to do what I want to do and I can't get into it? I am so ready to have a life and do nursing and be successful that it's sometimes overwhelming. For our sake, I really do believe that our nervousness and apprehension is due to having the feeling that a former career choice kind of blew up in our faces. Forgive me if you do not feel this way...I'm kind of just lumping us together =) Anyway, I hope that is why I feel the way that I do.

    Good luck in the next couple of years!!! =) Hope this has offered some insight that you are not alone!
    Amy
    I felt your pain when you speak of your Master's in Counseling. My MSEd is in Counseling. It was a major reason I went back for my MSN. Congrats on your career move and your soon to be graduation.
    Last edit by Thunderwolf on Dec 5, '05

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