to quit nursing school? - page 2

Has anyone seriously thought about quitting nursing school, but decided to stay? I'm not talking about fleeting thoughts when there is a horrific care plan due etc., but seriously thought maybe... Read More

  1. by   Claver
    Think about clinicals as if you were learning to drive- for about 5-10 minutes when you are taking your driving test - you have to give a perfect performance - every one hates it - after that you have a lot of choices - So clinicals are very important to nursing - you must acquire these basic skills - after you graduate, there are many, many, many choices - so just hang in there
  2. by   NurseFirst
    I just re-read this and realized someone might think it is a take-off on his "I have a dream" speech. Trust me, I wasn't thinking of that at all!!!!


    Quote from NurseFirst
    In my world of all worlds, my dream is not to get up at 5:00am, be dressed perfectly, figure out how to take the fewest things into clinical because we don't have lockers and because we can't put our vest on until we are in the hospital (so maybe putting all your "pocket stuff" into your vest pockets while it's still folded up and stuff could fall out is not the best thing.).

    It's also not my dream to feel dependent upon others in having to perform skills because I've never done them before on a real person, or grab an instructor because I have to do my third check with them, and because I can't give medications unobserved. It's not my dream to be criticized or yelled at; learning can be, but is not always, fun.

    It's not my dream to come home and have to write up care plans and medication sheets for several hours...

    It's not my dream to spend hours on my feet unpaid, in fact, having to pay for the experience--both directly and in terms of lost income. It's not my dream to worry about whether I will make a mistake while learning that will cause me to be dropped from the program. It's not my dream to have to write up various "corrective" documents for "errors" I have made in clinical.

    I think there's a lot different about "clinicals" than real life. It is true, however, that once out of clinicals you will be even more responsible for human lives than you are as a student.

    As other people have pointed out, you've come this far, you are likely to succeed in getting your RN, and your RN can open up many many doors for you, some that don't even involve pt contact. To me an RN is to health care as an MBA is to business: they are degrees recognized for competency in a particular area that can be utilized in a variety of areas.

    Good luck to you!!!

    NurseFirst
  3. by   girlfromtx
    "I might also add I have clinical in an hour so I may sound more negative than usual. haha.."

    That was also one of my problems lol, I was about to leave for clinical. What everyone was saying, I felt like I was the only one feeling that way. Having to bug nurses to open doors using their codes... I seem to lose my common sense when my instructor is there and I am doing a new skill, or even a skill that I have done once or twice before (IV's, I'm talking to you). Ok so I guess these feeling are universal huh. You know it's just some days I love clinicals, where you get the patient that tells you how great you are :chuckle , then there are the days where I'm like what am I doing here. Such mood swings in nursing school lol. I didn't expect so many replies, thanks for the encouragement guys. I think maybe nursing school doesn't seem so bad anymore.
  4. by   Ayvah
    Clinicals to me feel like the first few days on the job. You can't do much, you feel like you're in the way, and you don't know all the people. I, too, like the classroom work of learning the material, but don't see the clinicals as much fun because I feel so restricted in them. I look forward to the weekend when my clinicals have been completed =)
  5. by   twinmommy+2
    What I absolutly hate and will probly always hate is when I walk into a patients room and either the patient or their family goes "so you're a student?! Do I get a regular nurse then or am I just stuck with you" and the attitude that goes along with it. Like we are there to diliberatly kill someone lol

    Have you ever thought about being a "nurse educator"? There is such a shortage of good nurse educators out there. You could be the one teaching the didactic portion of it all and not have to nessessarly handle clinicals.

    Just a thought.

    I met a Warrent Officer once in the Army. She said that when she went to mechanic's school she had the hardest time with the electronic side of it. Just hated wiring and everything to do with it. So, instead of defeating herself, she made it her mission to learn everything she could about it. She is now the most knowledgable about the subject in most motor pools (or was at the time, it was 10 years ago).

    If you know that you want to stick it out (and you should) just make it your mission in life to make the hardest things what you know best. Your confidence will probably go up too! Keep your head up!
  6. by   RN2Bn2006
    Quote from girlfromtx
    Has anyone seriously thought about quitting nursing school, but decided to stay? I'm not talking about fleeting thoughts when there is a horrific care plan due etc., but seriously thought maybe nursing wasn't for them? I keep feeling this way, and dread the clinicals. The only thing keeping me here is the fact that I am just so far into it, that quitting, and starting over would be a very long process. I am doing fine grade-wise, I don't think the classes are too challenging, I just don't like it. So, I kinda just want to hear if there are any others that feel the same way, or have felt that way, and what kept you in nursing school. I need some inspiration here . Thanks.
    I in almost the same boat as you - except I do have a few good clinical days - for the most part I dread it. But I agree with another poster that most of the clinicals are in med-surg, and I already KNOW that isn't for me. I am looking at the fact that school isn't forever, and when I am out, I can find my niche (sp?) in my career. You have worked WAY TOO HARD to get where you are to drop out now!!!! Do the calendar thing, give yourself a pep talk on the way to clinicals everyday (that's what I have to do) and realize that what you are doing in clinicals is only a drop in the bucket to all the different routes you can take when you graduate. That's what I have to do.

    Good Luck & DON't QUIT!!!! (coming from someone who would like to on some days! - it's just NOT allowed in my vocabulary)

    PB
  7. by   girlfromtx
    Quote from twinmommy+1
    What I absolutly hate and will probly always hate is when I walk into a patients room and either the patient or their family goes "so you're a student?! Do I get a regular nurse then or am I just stuck with you" and the attitude that goes along with it. Like we are there to diliberatly kill someone lol

    Have you ever thought about being a "nurse educator"? There is such a shortage of good nurse educators out there. You could be the one teaching the didactic portion of it all and not have to nessessarly handle clinicals.

    Just a thought.

    I met a Warrent Officer once in the Army. She said that when she went to mechanic's school she had the hardest time with the electronic side of it. Just hated wiring and everything to do with it. So, instead of defeating herself, she made it her mission to learn everything she could about it. She is now the most knowledgable about the subject in most motor pools (or was at the time, it was 10 years ago).

    If you know that you want to stick it out (and you should) just make it your mission in life to make the hardest things what you know best. Your confidence will probably go up too! Keep your head up!
    That's an awesome idea! Well now I'm inspired. I'm off to study...
  8. by   perfectbluebuildings
    I too am usually TERRIFIED about clinicals even though it's my fifth semester of them, but usually once i get in there and start working, it is never as bad as I imagine it will be! One thing that helped me, though it too was scary, was the externship I did last summer where I got LOTS and LOTS of clinical time working very closely with one specific nurse, and that made me more comfortable in the clinical setting and talking with patients. Too, I loved pediatrics and was much more comfortable during that clinical- I think if you find a specialty you enjoy then you will be more comfortable and eager to be there, like someone else said. Also a lot depends on the instructor- if they are more laid back and supportive, you will also probably be more comfortable but if they are breathing down your neck and looking to pick out all mistakes, you feel like you can't do anything right. at least that's how I am. Good Luck- you can do it!!!

close