Take ACLS before last semester of Nursing School? - page 2

Just looking for opinions... Would it be wise to take ACLS before/during the semester of nursing school... 1.) to have that knowledge/experience and 2.) to be more marketable to potential... Read More

  1. Visit  CP2013 profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    New grads who take ACLS have a piece of paper that proves nothing. Really. They'll be much better off if they take ACLS when they have some clinical experience to which to relate it. If I were hiring I'd look at a new grad with all sorts of certs (and no other practical RN work experience) and wonder who's had smoke blown where-- the student, for believing someone who told them they would help them get a lock on a job, or me, because this student believes this will really impress me. And then... how much other foolishness will come with it? New grad = new grad. Don't think you're fooling anyone about that. Sorry.
    Good to know. No wonder new grads are filling their resumes with volunteer experience and waiting two years for jobs. We try to hard and we blow smoke! Haha

    But in all seriousness, I was just going off what I was told by clinical instructors. Guess they are wrong. I have my paperwork together in case I need to call in a favor overseas to get a job.

    Thanks for the word of advice!
  2. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from CP2013
    And being out of practice for 4+ years means that their ACLS and PALS certs have expired.

    At my school we only do BLS every 2 years. So when I am eligible for hire, I will only have BLS, like all 2000+ other grads flooding the area. (Unless they are current EMS/Medic/LPN, etc)
    I feel for you I really do. I did not mean to upset you......although it is obvious I did. ANY experience will be useful in your search for a position, including yours as an ED tech. I am not negating your experience for that will count but so will the medics experience. Shaving a patients groin is important and knowing how to perform an EKG is as well, so is the ability to draw blood....that alone will give you an advantage........but lets be clear the decision making experience the medics will have from their street experience is very different than the decision making you utilize as a tech.....The medics still have their EMT-P and their experience on the street will count as well. They may even have their ACLS as well.

    Please.......follow your instructors advice. They know your local job market and what the hospitals in your area may be looking for......I am just saying as a hiring manager a new grad with ACLS isn't weighed any greater than a new grad who does not.....but like I said that depends on your demographic.....where you live. I look at overall experience. New grads are not "overlooked" in specialties but their newness of their skills and decision making process weighs heavily on a hiring managers mind. ANY new grad requires guidance and further education at the bedside to allow them the time necessary to assimilate all the information they have learned into practice....the EMT-P will have this challenge as well for they need to learn how to be a nurse.

    The job market really stinks right now and for that I am sorry....new grads are considered for "specialty" positions but they are few and far between. Your experience as a tech, while it gives you "technical skill", does not provide the critical thinking skills necessary for these critical care areas that require a strong knowledge base in the basics so you can build upon this base with advanced concepts to make the critical split second decisions that patients depend on in providing optimal care in these areas.

    Ageism does exist in nursing...but not the way you think. Hospitals do not like older nurses, for they cost money. Hospitals aren't hiring new grads right now because they are too cheap to train them. The job market stinks nation wide...there may be jobs posted but hospitals aren't hiring. Going overseas is an option but search the forums......many other countries are having the same issues as the US....it's a global economy. The job market is not fair to new grads....these is no denying that.......the job market is bad for all college grads with 50% (in some studies) unable to find jobs in their field of study.

    I wish you the best of luck as you finish school and begin your journey as a nurse.
  3. Visit  CP2013 profile page
    0
    Quote from Esme12

    I feel for you I really do. I did not mean to upset you......although it is obvious I did. ANY experience will be useful in your search for a position, including yours as an ED tech. I am not negating your experience for that will count but so will the medics experience. Shaving a patients groin is important and knowing how to perform an EKG is as well, so is the ability to draw blood....that alone will give you an advantage........but lets be clear the decision making experience the medics will have from their street experience is very different than the decision making you utilize as a tech.....The medics still have their EMT-P and their experience on the street will count as well. They may even have their ACLS as well.

    Please.......follow your instructors advice. They know your local job market and what the hospitals in your area may be looking for......I am just saying as a hiring manager a new grad with ACLS isn't weighed any greater than a new grad who does not.....but like I said that depends on your demographic.....where you live. I look at overall experience. New grads are not "overlooked" in specialties but their newness of their skills and decision making process weighs heavily on a hiring managers mind. ANY new grad requires guidance and further education at the bedside to allow them the time necessary to assimilate all the information they have learned into practice....the EMT-P will have this challenge as well for they need to learn how to be a nurse.

    The job market really stinks right now and for that I am sorry....new grads are considered for "specialty" positions but they are few and far between. Your experience as a tech, while it gives you "technical skill", does not provide the critical thinking skills necessary for these critical care areas that require a strong knowledge base in the basics so you can build upon this base with advanced concepts to make the critical split second decisions that patients depend on in providing optimal care in these areas.

    Ageism does exist in nursing...but not the way you think. Hospitals do not like older nurses, for they cost money. Hospitals aren't hiring new grads right now because they are too cheap to train them. The job market stinks nation wide...there may be jobs posted but hospitals aren't hiring. Going overseas is an option but search the forums......many other countries are having the same issues as the US....it's a global economy. The job market is not fair to new grads....these is no denying that.......the job market is bad for all college grads with 50% (in some studies) unable to find jobs in their field of study.

    I wish you the best of luck as you finish school and begin your journey as a nurse.
    No offense really, I just know that I have to be able to be confident in myself and defend myself, because no one else is going to do so. No one is going to bat for me, resume in hand to hiring managers. Oh I wish they would though! Haha

    Well I have family overseas and have a job waiting if I want it, but I love the US. It's familiar, so I don't want to leave, but I also don't want to be miserable and without a job for 2 years like some new grads are.

    As for new grads, we span decades, and it seems anyone over 35 lands a job do much easier than those under 30. I guess life experience matters?
  4. Visit  libby11 profile page
    0
    Thanks for the input everyone. So far, it seems smart to wait until I get into practice and get the feel for the real world before I make such a decision. I appreciate the replies
    Last edit by libby11 on Sep 18, '12 : Reason: typo
  5. Visit  c21 profile page
    0
    It is a difficult course to pass without some code experience and experience with cardiac drugs/ antiarrhythmics. I would certainly at least wait until graduation, and after the NCLEX- so that you can focus solely on the course. Read the book AND understand the content before going to class!
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Feb 8 : Reason: TOS - self-promo
  6. Visit  La Cubanita RN profile page
    0
    I think taking it as soon as you graduate because they all want it anyway and everyone I've seen get hired already has all that stuff BLS PALS ACLS. Not while your in school though
  7. Visit  OneHappyRN profile page
    0
    I don't think it would hurt, but I also don't think it's necessary. I was hired in Sept and I'm just now taking an ACLS course - and the hospital is paying for it.


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