No IV Practice / Little hands-on practice in clinicals - page 5

by SlyFoxRN

8,135 Views | 42 Comments

Hello all, I am half way finished with my 1 year accelerated BSN program, and so far I like it for the most part. Our classes have been really interesting and in depth regarding disease processes, etc. and I'm doing quite... Read More


  1. 0
    a lot of nursing schools in my state do not practice IV starts either. Its considered "on the job training." I had an IV skills class in two hospitals I was hired at after graduating. For one hospital, I never even had a chance to put those skills to use. I was on a floor (acute rehab) where if they had access, it was a PICC line, which was maintained by IV therapy. When I got hired into L&D, I was fully trained and now do starts regularly. Also, in this particular hospital, only certain units are allowed to start their own IV's (ED, ICU, L&D, tele)....the rest of the hospital, the IV team comes and does the starts. Its hospital policy. So I dont find it all that strange that your nursing program isnt training you on IV starts.
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    In my facility, it is frowned upon to use the IV team as your first line for IV starts.
  3. 0
    Nursing school clinical rotations do seem like a horribly mismanaged affair. To me, it would make more sense to complete all of the didactic and laboratory components and then move on to a clinical rotation at the end of the semester (say, the last two to three weeks). By doing that, you'd be able to integrate everything you covered in that semester, assuming the patient load allowed for it, and you wouldn't be skipping back and forth between "Yeah, we covered that, but we didn't cover this. I don't know what that guy's disease/medicine/intervention is." I think it's stupid.

    I also think the last semester of the program should have a more intern-oriented clinical whereby you show up, do the job, and leave under the guidance of a staff nurse. Stepping into the clinical environment periodically doesn't allow you the probability of encountering a patient that's going to require a lot of interventions. However, being there everyday for a prolonged period does. I say this not even liking clinicals. I'm all about the cognitive process and deciding what to do. I couldn't care less about the hands on part. There isn't one technical "skill" or procedure that I have any eagerness to engage in simply because I'm not a hands on kind of guy. I'd rather stand in the corner, make a decision, and have someone else do it, but I still think nursing school would enjoy marked improvement by following my model.


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