New Diversity Criteria for Admission...what to make of that?

  1. OK all, I just got a letter from my school last night that states they are instituting a new criteria of "diversity" for admission to all programs. I am applying for ADN in August for the January class. The letter states basically that they are modifying their criteria to focus on more than just the previously stated criteria of grades/pre-requ.s/essay/test scores to include factors to increase the diversity of the school. Please don't start a flame war on this with political opinions, this is what I want to know -- do any of you have any experience such that you can advise me on how this will play out in selecting candidates?

    Of course, I'm worried about my specific chances of getting in. I don't have much to offer in terms of diversity...except that I'm older than average. But I'm a married white female and can't cite a disadvantaged background. I have good grades etc. You can see where this is going, right? My school last year had 180 applicants for 100 spots. Lowest GPA admitted was I believe a 3.1. I have a 3.4 right now and am working hard to get A's in the 2 pre-requ.s I lack.

    Please share your specific experience with this issue in your school. Thanks, all.
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  2. 107 Comments

  3. by   Sheri257
    I don't know about nursing school, but as a white woman, I once lost a job to a black man with less qualifications because of the "diversity" issue. It was kinda strange because I thought women were supposed to be disadvantaged too.

    My guess is that some qualified candidates will lose because of this. It's only logical. If there are limited slots and racial preference is stated, qualified whites are going to lose. The only question is how many and how much they're willing to change the standards to get more minorities in there.

    I wouldn't lose all hope though. Does your school maintain a waiting list? If so, there might be chance you will only be bumped by an extra semester. Still a pain, but at least not a total loss.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Feb 14, '04
  4. by   Soonstudent
    Affirmative Actions at it's best!
  5. by   fergus51
    It doesn't say race does it? My program also looked for diversity, meaning they wanted students with a variety of backgrounds instead of having a class of 60 18 year olds straight from high school. We had older students, younger ones, married ones, single ones, those starting a second career, parents, people active in the church, atheists, men, women, etc. Personally, I think these were all valuable to consider for admission. Having a homogenious nursing class doesn't prepare you for the real world where you will be expected to work with a variety of people.
  6. by   LydiaGreen
    Fresh from graduation from high school I applied to three schools of journalism. One is the third leading journalism school in North America and not only was I accepted there, but received the offer of an entrance scholarship. But, it was a 24 hour drive away from home. I was accepted to the second one as well but it was even further away. The third one, only four hours away from home, did not accept me. I was MAD when I discovered a couple of months later that another student who happened to be a minority but who barely graduated was accepted to that third school. This person BARELY graduated while I was an honour roll student with four advanced literature courses under my belt with a trilogy as my senior class project, had worked at the local paper for three years and had my own weekly high school column at the same paper for two years. All of that was on my application. But, I didn't get in and this other person did. She flunked out at the end of the first semester. I wasn't surprised. This was my experience (although I still find it frustrating, I am glad that I didn't head down that road or I wouldn't be about to graduate from nursing school now and journalism - although I am great at writing, journalism is a cut-throat, have no feelings profession and I would have gone crazy).

    This was my experience. Take it for whatever you think it is worth. I wish you luck. If you don't get in the first time around, keep trying. You have worked this long and hard so you must have the desire to be a good nurse and goodness knows we need more of them!
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from fergus51
    It doesn't say race does it?
    In most cases, "diversity" is the new code word for race quotas and affirmative action. They don't like to use those words any more because it's controversial. So they call it "diversity."

    If it's not based on race, I would really be surprized.
  8. by   MyReign1
    Quote from lizz
    In most cases, "diversity" is the new code word for race quotas and affirmative action. They don't like to use those words any more because it's controversial. So they call it "diversity."

    If it's not based on race, I would really be surprized.

    Have u ever considered it may mean sex (as in men of all colors) not just race?
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from MyReign1
    Have u ever considered it may mean sex (as in men of all colors) not just race?
    Well, that would be interesting, if that was the case. In my experience, diversity almost always means race. But, of course, I could be wrong.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think it's a crock of crap to have any sort of quotas that are based on race, ethnic background, age, sex, etc.

    Acceptance to a new job, school, etc should go to the best person QUALIFIED for it, and not because a company or school needs to keep a certain percentage up.
  11. by   fergus51
    I don't think diversity is always code word, and I don't think the minimum standards are changed to allow unqualified people in. It just means that is one thing they consider, along with the traditional criteria, not that they have a quota system.
  12. by   TweetiePieRN
    I live in california and "diversity" is shoved down our throats every second of the day. I have friends and even family members of different races/ethnicities/whatever and never think twice about the fact that they are "different". The most qualified person should be accepted into the nursing program...regardless of the "diversity" of such a person. A person cannot control their race, gender or ethnicity...But can control the amount of skill or knowledge they can bring to the table. What's next... accepting students into the program who do not know English, just for the sake of diversity?
  13. by   nekhismom
    Just another way to discriminate against everyone. When people, or businesses, or schools, etc. start catering to quotas for diversity, everyone loses. Sure, more minorities may be considered, but more qualified minorities may be denied access due to the institution's quota on how many "minority" students it has to consider. And what about the non-minority population? They suffer too. That is why I firmly believe in the army's philosophy of race......there is NO COLOR except green! No blacks, no whites, no hispanics, nothing but soldiers. Everyone's treated the same, provided you have the same qualifications. ( I'm not saying that discrimination doesn't occur, but at least they try).

    This is the MAIN reason why I refuse to answer questions about my race, gender, etc. on applications or any other form that asks. Frankly, it's nobody's business. I just see it as a tool to use to discriminate.
  14. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from nekhismom
    Just another way to discriminate against everyone. When people, or businesses, or schools, etc. start catering to quotas for diversity, everyone loses. Sure, more minorities may be considered, but more qualified minorities may be denied access due to the institution's quota on how many "minority" students it has to consider. And what about the non-minority population? They suffer too. That is why I firmly believe in the army's philosophy of race......there is NO COLOR except green! No blacks, no whites, no hispanics, nothing but soldiers. Everyone's treated the same, provided you have the same qualifications. ( I'm not saying that discrimination doesn't occur, but at least they try).

    This is the MAIN reason why I refuse to answer questions about my race, gender, etc. on applications or any other form that asks. Frankly, it's nobody's business. I just see it as a tool to use to discriminate.
    I agree with you!! I never fill out those crazy questions either.

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