I'm not going to lie... - page 8

by StudentOfHealing 9,813 Views | 134 Comments

Some people genuinely annoy me on here, I'm ALL for furthering education but dreading those of us who choose to start with our ADN is complete disrespect. Had my mother been healthier (she has RA and her pain is becoming... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from StudentOfHealing
    I don't believe I actually said, and I did not mean it to come off such way. My point was geared towards the degrading of the ADN. I completely believe obtaining your BSN and MSN is good... I plan to do that ... why would I oppose it?
    I got my CNA license last summer. It's just a semester long. I took it over the summer so it was only 7 week, but still had 210 clinical hours.
  2. 1
    Quote from heartsgal
    I suppose I do sound a little defensive and that was not my intention. I do however grow weary of nurses asking me what degree I am getting and when I'm tell them I"m graduating with my ADN, the first reply is are you going to get your BSN soon? Or begin telling my why I need to continue on for my BSN. It is rather frustrating to constantly be defending your choices when you actually feel quite proud of your accomplishment and all you want to hear is way to go from your fellow nurse. In one of the posts in this thread someone even went as far to say it was easier to get an ADN because it is faster, which is absolutely false. But we all know the saying about everyone having opinions among other things LOL, so point taken. I need to remember to lighten up
    I understand where you're coming from! I agree, it isn't necessarily faster doing the ADN route.
    heartsgal likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from bigsick_littlesick
    Meh, I get where you're coming from but don't let it get to you. I just graduated with my ADN and passed NCLEX. I plan on going for my BSN as soon as possible. I'm currently a CNA and I wouldn't be able to discern between an ADN or BSN on the floor unless I asked them personally.

    Our program (American River College) here in Sacramento, has an excellent reputation. Some of the best, most bada** nurses were ARC grads, I found out.

    I think it's a personal decision whichever way you go about becoming a nurse. If someone has a problem with that, that's on them. You're still really young, don't worry, you've got plenty of time. It's never too late, IMO. It's your life, don't let other people's attitudes get to you. You know what you need to do so go do it! Good luck!
    Just wanted to say...you're currently an RN working as a CNA . You deserve the title you earned it.

    "No day but today"
  4. 0
    Quote from Jill2Shay
    Many hospitals are going to be requiring it soon anyway. One local hospital told all their LPNs they had to go get their RNs within X amount of time or be demoted to some kind of administrative role. The same will hold true with the BSN. If you're an ADN they'll give you X amount of years to either get into a program or complete a program, or be demoted to a CNA status.

    Licensing may or may not follow suit. Who knows.
    Mine requires it now. New hires must agree to get it in 4 years and current employees can't transfer if they don't agree to get it in 4 years.

    "No day but today"
  5. 0
    Quote from Ackeem
    i apologize if i offended any ADN RN i didn't mean to, i was just ignorant of the fact that one could go to college for 2 years and qualify to sit the same exam that BSN students take. And then be granted the same scope of practice with similar compensation. that doesn't happen in my country, an RN equates to someone who went to a university for 4 years period, 2 years of education equates to a "nursing assistant" who went to a community college. This is simply maintaining a high standard of a profession.
    A lot of the ADNs I work with are going back for their BSNs and the pre reqs required are ridiculous. Like music and religion. The nursing classes involved are not more than one or two semesters all together.

    "No day but today"
  6. 0
    Quote from Anoetos

    This is mythology, or rather, part of the larger mythology ADNs have constructed for themselves.

    The clinical hours required to sit for the NCLEX are dictated by the SBON. They are the same for both ADNs and BSNs, and they can't be otherwise.

    Another favorite piece of this mythology is the idea you also repeat that ADNs are better at "bedside nursing" than BSNs. Not only is this not true, it's not even quantifiable (but then neither is that other idea that ADNs start faster but BSNs catch up in a year).

    It's all nonsense.
    ^ Thank you for clarifying this myth...the clinical hours are set forth by the BON...there is no difference in clinical hours by which degree path you choose. This is used too many times, and it may be a comfort to some to believe in that "truth" but in fact, it's simply not true.

    I went through something that was defined as an accelerated program (I was an LPN). It was 1 year less of time to do coursework...instead of 3 years of nursing education, it was 2 because we went through the summer. We had lab immersion, and were at area hospitals for Med-Surg, OB, Peds; we were able to rotate to ICU, ER, PACU for critical care; I was on a Stepdown Unit with Tele for my senior year. We helped with admissions, discharges, learned how to do a transfer report and a admission report.

    Boston is correct; the way healthcare is rapidly changing, the ability to present the process if nursing care, compare trends, make up new processes and proceed with learning and helping contribute to the epidemics that our pt population is facing is done at the bedside. It is important to understand in depth how research is driven by Benner's theory or Watson's theory and how to apply it in terms if pt teaching and how effective your practice can be in those terms, and if your trend works, how important that can be implemented in all nurses in their practice...that's the beauty of nursing, and what I have learned in my BSN coursework.

    I do not speak about ADN nursing, however, I feel that this information can be presented though nursing education courses at facilities; I'm not necessarily dismissing the investment hospitals may have to pump in with the additional information; although as a new grad I am fortunate to be at a facility that goes through a good orientation in seminars and classroom time about safety, ethics, advocating for yourself, transparency-a lot of humanities-based discussions and interactions in ADDITION to matching preceptorship and mentoring, and all new grads enter the residency program as well. We learn how to do reports documentation, etc...we went over the basics of what I learned in clinicals, and that is a requirement of preceptorship to learn all these aspects; regardless of degree. Even though they prefer to hire BSNs, regardless of the degree, we are privy to the same orientation program.

    Again, I have to agree with Boston about sooner rather than later, the BSN will be relied on an entry level to practice. I am in an area where nursing research is happening all the time, and being used constantly, so it is coming to the bedside, as well as the ability for a lot of procedures that physicians are used to doing are being offered to the nurse. Our scope is expanding in our area, mainly because of the research nursing that is being done...expanding on the base of "what you know" is an investment, because our practice continues to evolve, and I at want to be prepared. I also think that regardless of what path to the RN, all nurses should have the opportunity to be prepared without breaking the bank either.

    Something has to give...because the role of the nurse is changing, without a doubt.
  7. 0
    Quote from Anoetos

    The clinical hours required to sit for the NCLEX are dictated by the SBON. They are the same for both ADNs and BSNs, and they can't be otherwise.
    It's all nonsense.
    The MINIMUM number of clinical hours is set by the BON. It's entirely possible for one program to get more clinical hours than other.

    Before the surge of BSN students came to town, the ADN programs far exceeded the minimum number of hours - almost double the hours BSN students were getting. Fewer hours in lecture left more time for the hospital.

    Now everyone is fighting for clinical space and the scale is pretty even.
  8. 0
    Quote from Stephalump
    The MINIMUM number of clinical hours is set by the BON. It's entirely possible for one program to get more clinical hours than other.Before the surge of BSN students came to town, the ADN programs far exceeded the minimum number of hours - almost double the hours BSN students were getting. Fewer hours in lecture left more time for the hospital. Now everyone is fighting for clinical space and the scale is pretty even.
    I'd love to see the evidence for this
  9. 3
    Everyone thinks of an associate's degree as a very basic, two year degree. In reality, that's not true, as the ADN takes more than two years when you consider the 1-2 semesters of prerequisites required. I don't think there any other associate's-level programs that are similar. So to start, I think the ADN label is almost somewhat of a misnomer in the nursing field, as ADN's have more credits than their fellow associate's-level educated peers.

    But consider the degree level of every other non-MD/DO group working in the hospital. Physical therapists have a doctorate, and speech pathologists have a master's degree (referring to newer entrants into the field, not older professionals). From what I can see, respiratory therapy and radiology tech are pushing to transition away from the associate's degree to bachelor's or higher. I'm not going to argue that one nursing degree is inferior to the other, but I do think we should push for degree parity with these other professionals. What we do is just as important and requires just as impressive a knowledge base, our degree should reflect that.
    gummi bear, Anoetos, and Ackeem like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from Anoetos
    I'd love to see the evidence for this
    I think she meant local to her, not on a national level.


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