I have a Low GPA Bachelor's Degree (2.26), and an Associates of Science(GPA 3.13) Options?

  1. Hello all,
    This is my first post and while there have been similar posts about getting into a nursing program with a low GPA bachelor's degree, I have some very specific questions. So thank you in advance.

    My background:
    I graduated with an Associates of Science Degree from a Community College with a GPA of 3.13 and just last year a Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology with a GPA of 2.26. My University did not transfer my Community College GPA hence this GPA is pretty much my Major GPA as well (I was fortunate to save $ and take almost all pre-requisites at community) With that being said, my academic problems started due to personal matters and while a 2.26 does not look like much it is to be noted I was below a 1.8 at one point, so I really believe I have the aptitude and study habits to be successful in a nursing program. I have been considering nursing for a while now, before I even completed my Bachelor of Science, I just wanted to complete my program because of all the amount (blood, sweat, tears, money) I had put in. Anyways with that being said, on to my questions:

    1. Is it unheard of for people who already have a bachelor's degree and an associates to go back and get a second associates degree (in nursing)?

    2. If I am to get into an Associates of Science (Nursing) program at the same community college I received my first degree in, and end up doing very well in my coursework, will applying for a BSN program ONLY consider my GPA from the later associates degree? This college seems to offer an ADN-BSN track linking with a University for qualified transfer students (I still have yet to talk to an advisor to get all the information on this)

    3. As you can tell I'm not asking about getting into an Accelerated BSN Nursing Program, it would be the ideal choice if my Undergrad GPA was higher, I don't want to go back to my University and repeat courses at the moment because it's just too expensive, and i'd have to go for a year or two just to get it at 2.5 (Why not spend that time/money getting an associates and trying to go for an ADN-BSN program.) With all this being said, could someone enlighten me on anything else I should consider?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Okami_CCRN
    Quote from Nursingiq
    Hello all,
    This is my first post and while there have been similar posts about getting into a nursing program with a low GPA bachelor's degree, I have some very specific questions. So thank you in advance.

    My background:
    I graduated with an Associates of Science Degree from a Community College with a GPA of 3.13 and just last year a Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology with a GPA of 2.26. My University did not transfer my Community College GPA hence this GPA is pretty much my Major GPA as well (I was fortunate to save $ and take almost all pre-requisites at community) With that being said, my academic problems started due to personal matters and while a 2.26 does not look like much it is to be noted I was below a 1.8 at one point, so I really believe I have the aptitude and study habits to be successful in a nursing program. I have been considering nursing for a while now, before I even completed my Bachelor of Science, I just wanted to complete my program because of all the amount (blood, sweat, tears, money) I had put in. Anyways with that being said, on to my questions:

    1. Is it unheard of for people who already have a bachelor's degree and an associates to go back and get a second associates degree (in nursing)?

    It is quite common for people to have a degree in an unrelated field and then receive a nursing degree. I for one graduated with a BA in biology and am now finishing an RN-BSN program.

    2. If I am to get into an Associates of Science (Nursing) program at the same community college I received my first degree in, and end up doing very well in my coursework, will applying for a BSN program ONLY consider my GPA from the later associates degree? This college seems to offer an ADN-BSN track linking with a University for qualified transfer students (I still have yet to talk to an advisor to get all the information on this)

    Most RN-BSN programs require a minimum GPA of 2.5, which usually is related to the nursing degree. However, you must submit ALL transcripts from ALL institutions of higher learning. When I applied for my current RN-BSN program and submitted all of my college transcripts, I was awarded credit in almost all general education categories to the point where I only needed to take 10 courses to graduate (most were senior level nursing courses).

    3. As you can tell I'm not asking about getting into an Accelerated BSN Nursing Program, it would be the ideal choice if my Undergrad GPA was higher, I don't want to go back to my University and repeat courses at the moment because it's just too expensive, and i'd have to go for a year or two just to get it at 2.5 (Why not spend that time/money getting an associates and trying to go for an ADN-BSN program.) With all this being said, could someone enlighten me on anything else I should consider?
    My best advise is to do what is best in your situation, but also look at the costs versus benefit. Shop around before you commit to any single program.
  4. by   Guy in Babyland
    Since your BS degree was just completed last year, I would do some true soul searching to determine if your personal problems were 100% the cause of your low GPA. I know that personal problems can interfere with your academic performance, but only you can determine if there were other causative factors (study habits, procrastination, etc.) that led to the GPA. Nursing school is not an easy major and requires a large amount of studying and skills training. Just make sure you're prepared.
  5. by   beekee
    Quote from Nursingiq

    1. Is it unheard of for people who already have a bachelor's degree and an associates to go back and get a second associates degree (in nursing)?
    standards.
    I went to a community college for my ADN. Most of my class had bachelor's degrees in other areas. Many of my classmates even had master's degrees. Community college is a very attractive option for people with prior degrees as community college is cheap. My community college had over 400 applications for 60 spots.

    Quote from Nursingiq
    2. If I am to get into an Associates of Science (Nursing) program at the same community college I received my first degree in, and end up doing very well in my coursework, will applying for a BSN program ONLY consider my GPA from the later associates degree? This college seems to offer an ADN-BSN track linking with a University for qualified transfer students (I still have yet to talk to an advisor to get all the information on this)
    standards.
    Totally depends on the school. Some look at everything, some only look at certain courses, some look at the last X credits, etc. It just depends on what the school's policy is.

    Quote from Nursingiq
    3. As you can tell I'm not asking about getting into an Accelerated BSN Nursing Program, it would be the ideal choice if my Undergrad GPA was higher, I don't want to go back to my University and repeat courses at the moment because it's just too expensive, and i'd have to go for a year or two just to get it at 2.5 (Why not spend that time/money getting an associates and trying to go for an ADN-BSN program.) With all this being said, could someone enlighten me on anything else I should consider?
    standards.
    Most ABSN programs have GPA requirements higher than 2.5. Even if you met the minimum GPA requirement, competition is usually quite high for admission to any type of nursing school (ASN, BSN ABSN). As I mentioned above, my community college accepted 15% of the applicants. Your options may be limited to a for-profit school with looser admission standards.
  6. by   JBMmom
    I also went to a CC program with many students (including myself) with previous BS/MS degrees from previous careers. However, the minimum overall GPA for applying to my school was 2.7. Of applicants with at least a 2.7, 40% of the class was a lottery of students after the first 60% was from the top applicants. However, we also had hundreds of applications for the 96 slots. As someone else mentioned, you may be limited in your options due to the minimum requirements. Wish you all the best in reaching your goals.
  7. by   Nursingiq
    Thank You so much for your reply, for answering my questions, and the advice.
  8. by   FullGlass
    I also had a low GPA in my initial undergrad education. When I decided to pursue an ABSN, I retook some classes - the ones I got a D, F, or I in. That helped raise the GPA. I also took some community college and Extension courses related to healthcare and got all As, which raised my GPA. For most nursing schools, the most important GPA is for the nursing prereqs. If you can retake any of those, do so. And if you still need to take some nursing prereqs, make sure to get a 4.0 in those.

    As others have noted, nursing school is incredibly grueling. Make sure you are truly ready for this. Good luck.

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