has anyone failed a semester - page 2

Have anyone of you failed a semester? I know a ton of nurses that failed, but succeeded once going back. I feel down on myself for failing second semester, but I'm keeping my head up, because this... Read More

  1. by   AppyHorseFan
    Quote from jemommy
    horsefan,
    i admire your faith, courage and strength to continue on the journey that you had once began. you have truly inspired me to keep trying if i ever find myself in this predicament. you sound like a very successful person despite your past failures and i love your positive talk about future tests. thank you for sharing your experience.

    jemommy
    jemommy, thank you for your kind words. it hasn't been an easy road these past few years, but i shall overcome and succeed. if you'll notice my sig line...god lead me here, he'll lead me through it. without his love and strength i couldn't have made it this far. and as someone else posted...i will one day soon prove to those people (ex-family) who said i couldn't do it...that i can...i did...and i will!!

    good luck and don't let them break you down!!
  2. by   AppyHorseFan
    Quote from gij1
    i bet you will be a dam good nurse. congratulations on being so close to the finish line. keep your nose in the books!
    gij1...thank you for your kind words. it's nice to hear someone say that they think you'll make a good nurse...i can hardly wait until we start preceptorship in just 4 short weeks... that means we have 4 weeks to get in 3 exams plus other class assignments!!! oh my, well, i gotta go...4 a.m. comes early down here in the south
  3. by   Djenkins5054
    Quote from 2ner
    Have anyone of you failed a semester? I know a ton of nurses that failed, but succeeded once going back. I feel down on myself for failing second semester, but I'm keeping my head up, because this gives me time to hone my study skills because I already have the content from this semester, so I plan on getting an A this semester coming up. At first I thought ir was devastating, and I was a failure, but even more EMBARRASSING because I've never failed at anything. I'm using this to my advantage though.

    Please, if anybody has been in a similar situation, please feel free to reply (sometiimes it makes you feel a little better knowing your not the only one going through something like this)

    I was a math failure 101, and I am going through the same old stuff again only this time I am better able to grasp the concepts I was too busy to see before. You don't need an A, but you do need to understand more deeply the information and focus on what it means to you and to your clients. Hang in there!
  4. by   wannabemw
    Update: I just missed getting into NSC (they lost my file) by two slots...UGH! I am still at UNLV & grad in May w/my BS in Public Health. I still dream of becoming a nurse and am applying for the accelerated program at NSC this fall. BTW: my GPA is now a 3.75 (found out I am ADD and doing well on meds). I too had to repeat Math, but got it in the end. Fun thing: my IQ test said that I have a Master's understanding of Math! LOL! Go figure. Oh yeah, my DH is now made a great turn-around and couldn't be prouder of me. My MIL too (still not telling her about NSC though...YET!).
    I like what you said "...God lead me here, He'll lead me through it. Without His love and strength I couldn't have made it this far." This is what has kept me going too! (It also answers my question every time I ever wonder if I am doing the right thing).
    Good Luck!
    ~MJ
  5. by   PDCNurse
    What doesn't kill us makes us stronger. This is a set back, not failure. You have a great attitude and you will succeed if you work hard and study like crazy. Nursing takes perserverance, patience, brains, and a strong mental attitude. It's not for everyone. I think you really want this and you will pass the next time.
  6. by   Morning-glory
    God, What a trip. Just reading these posts put me back about 10 years when I was a student. And I thank God everyday that I made it through. It took me 6 years to do a 3 year course. I could and did blame the school and anyone else I could attribute the blame to, but it still didn't fix my problem. I failed first year and repeated it. I passed 2nd year, but then I hit third year. I failed clinical in the fall semester (October),played computer games till the next September, then went back (5th year in by now) and failed clinical in December. Farted around with work and stuff, but by July, I realized that I did want to be a nurse so I went to the center for Students with Disabilities just to see if there was something going on that I needed to know about. I had been prone to anxiety attacks in clinicals which, in retrospect probably freaked out the instructors.

    So I did 20 hours of tests in 2 days. Oh Man!! that was hard. All of my symptoms came out in those 2 days. After all the results came in I was sent to a psychiatrist to help go through all the results.

    So I was diagnosed with a profound learning disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder (without the hyperactivity). The Doc was amazed that I had even made it past grade 4. My IQ was high, so I was able to push through high school, but in Nursing I had met my match. I was started on meds for the ADD and was given one last chance by the school. In 2 months I went from the bottom 10% of the class, to the top 5%. Clinicals were still hard, but with an understanding of myself, I was able to calm down on my own, without having a complete meltdown first.

    I am now teaching clinicals for the same school that I went to. And I am loving it. No commited student could ever be as bad as I was. All the older teachers remember me and groan, but they keep pushing me to go and get my degree, so that I could teach full-time. I know that I cannot work and go to school at the same time, so I will have to figure that one out in due course.

    Failing a course is a side step, not a down step. If you want it, keep fighting. If you feel that you are always losing, get tested for learning and mental health issues. It is so worth it. BTW, I was diagnosed at the age of 31. (what would my life had been if I had be diagnosed at the age of 7?)

    Hang in there,

    Jacquie (Proud to be an RN):hatparty:
  7. by   SarasotaRN2b
    wow, jacquie rn, you definitely are an example of preserverance. i think that with everything that you went through, you will be an excellent instructor. having the struggles that you had will make you more sensitive (i hope) to students struggling.

    i also want to teach at the community college that i am now attending. the difference will be that i'm going to the university to get my bsn so i can reach my goal a couple of years sooner.

    thanks for sharing your story!

    kris

    Quote from jacquie rn
    god, what a trip. just reading these posts put me back about 10 years when i was a student. and i thank god everyday that i made it through. it took me 6 years to do a 3 year course. i could and did blame the school and anyone else i could attribute the blame to, but it still didn't fix my problem. i failed first year and repeated it. i passed 2nd year, but then i hit third year. i failed clinical in the fall semester (october),played computer games till the next september, then went back (5th year in by now) and failed clinical in december. farted around with work and stuff, but by july, i realized that i did want to be a nurse so i went to the center for students with disabilities just to see if there was something going on that i needed to know about. i had been prone to anxiety attacks in clinicals which, in retrospect probably freaked out the instructors.

    so i did 20 hours of tests in 2 days. oh man!! that was hard. all of my symptoms came out in those 2 days. after all the results came in i was sent to a psychiatrist to help go through all the results.

    so i was diagnosed with a profound learning disorder and attention deficit disorder (without the hyperactivity). the doc was amazed that i had even made it past grade 4. my iq was high, so i was able to push through high school, but in nursing i had met my match. i was started on meds for the add and was given one last chance by the school. in 2 months i went from the bottom 10% of the class, to the top 5%. clinicals were still hard, but with an understanding of myself, i was able to calm down on my own, without having a complete meltdown first.

    i am now teaching clinicals for the same school that i went to. and i am loving it. no commited student could ever be as bad as i was. all the older teachers remember me and groan, but they keep pushing me to go and get my degree, so that i could teach full-time. i know that i cannot work and go to school at the same time, so i will have to figure that one out in due course.

    failing a course is a side step, not a down step. if you want it, keep fighting. if you feel that you are always losing, get tested for learning and mental health issues. it is so worth it. btw, i was diagnosed at the age of 31. (what would my life had been if i had be diagnosed at the age of 7?)

    hang in there,

    jacquie (proud to be an rn):hatparty:
  8. by   twinmommy+2
    Quote from Jacquie RN
    God, What a trip. Just reading these posts put me back about 10 years when I was a student. And I thank God everyday that I made it through. It took me 6 years to do a 3 year course. I could and did blame the school and anyone else I could attribute the blame to, but it still didn't fix my problem. I failed first year and repeated it. I passed 2nd year, but then I hit third year. I failed clinical in the fall semester (October),played computer games till the next September, then went back (5th year in by now) and failed clinical in December. Farted around with work and stuff, but by July, I realized that I did want to be a nurse so I went to the center for Students with Disabilities just to see if there was something going on that I needed to know about. I had been prone to anxiety attacks in clinicals which, in retrospect probably freaked out the instructors.

    So I did 20 hours of tests in 2 days. Oh Man!! that was hard. All of my symptoms came out in those 2 days. After all the results came in I was sent to a psychiatrist to help go through all the results.

    So I was diagnosed with a profound learning disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder (without the hyperactivity). The Doc was amazed that I had even made it past grade 4. My IQ was high, so I was able to push through high school, but in Nursing I had met my match. I was started on meds for the ADD and was given one last chance by the school. In 2 months I went from the bottom 10% of the class, to the top 5%. Clinicals were still hard, but with an understanding of myself, I was able to calm down on my own, without having a complete meltdown first.

    I am now teaching clinicals for the same school that I went to. And I am loving it. No commited student could ever be as bad as I was. All the older teachers remember me and groan, but they keep pushing me to go and get my degree, so that I could teach full-time. I know that I cannot work and go to school at the same time, so I will have to figure that one out in due course.

    Failing a course is a side step, not a down step. If you want it, keep fighting. If you feel that you are always losing, get tested for learning and mental health issues. It is so worth it. BTW, I was diagnosed at the age of 31. (what would my life had been if I had be diagnosed at the age of 7?)

    Hang in there,

    Jacquie (Proud to be an RN):hatparty:

    Thank you so much for sharing your story, you're an insparation!
  9. by   wannabemw
    Failing a course is a side step, not a down step. If you want it, keep fighting. If you feel that you are always losing, get tested for learning and mental health issues. It is so worth it. BTW, I was diagnosed at the age of 31. (what would my life had been if I had be diagnosed at the age of 7?)

    Hang in there,

    Jacquie (Proud to be an RN):hatparty:[/QUOTE]
    Jacquie,
    you make me want to cry tears of joy of happiness! There is someone out there that has gone through what i have gone through! YEAH! .... I have felt so alone! I was diagnosed @ 39y w/Adult ADD & @ 38y w/LD's. This was AFTER I flunked out of my BSN and various courses (and a lot of re-takes!). It's amazing I have come this far. My IQ is average. But all the testing explained a lot! My MIL wonders how I can make it through to be a Nurse w/all of this. It kinda shakes my confidence at times... BUT: I am doing SO much better on meds and my grades shot up too! I am scared though...I grad in May, then want to do this Accelerated BSN program in the Fall. Advise? Testing accomidations and having a note taker helps a lot. Plus I saw a woman who designed a program for individuals like myself w/LD's. Her tips really brought up my testing scores and recall ability.She's writing a book as we speak.
    Write me back! PLEASE! And anyone w/advise, suggestions...
    ~MJ
    Determined to one day call myself a Certified Nurse Midwife!
  10. by   NurseKat274
    YOU ARE NOT ALONE! I failed my OB course of my Bachelor's program, after passing (what was supposed to be the toughest course) med-surg with flying colors! I was so depressed and embarassed about OB because that course was supposed to be easy and I had a B in the class until the final test. But now, I am in peds and eager to kick nursing school's butt. I am not letting this stop me, even though it is scary to think about the potential consequences of failing another course. Just have to buckle down, study hard, and pray harder! Good luck to us both! We can do this!

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