Columbia vs. SUNY Stoneybrook - Does name matter?

  1. Hello!

    I'm a second-degree student, finishing up the pre-req's and looking into schools. I am SHOCKED at the wide range of tuitions. Columbia is over 30k a year, SUNY-Stoneybrook is only 8K a year. What's up with that?

    Do you find that the name/reputation of the school from which you graduated has had any impact in finding a job?

    Any advice on what to look for in a program?

    Thank you!

    Talldoll
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   PediRN
    Got my BSN from Columbia, getting my masters at a state school. I don't believe it makes that much of a difference. Except in my checkbook.
  4. by   2banurse
    SUNY Stonybrook is actually a very good school for the health sciences. I would suggest that you go there instead of Columbia for your undergraduate degree. If you decide to go further in your studies, you can always try Columbia and maybe you can have tuition reimbursement by your place of employment. Just an idea.

    Good luck with your decision!
    Kris
  5. by   talldollNYC
    Thank you PediRN and 2banurse for the good advice. It does seems like the best idea to do the 12month BSN program first - then figure out when and where to look at graduate programs.

    I've been researching all the schools in the NY area (Stonybrook, Binghamton, Pace, Hunter, Columbia, NYU, Adelphi, Mount St. Vincents, etc. etc. etc.). All the places with accelerated BSN degrees, or direct entry MSN programs. Though I am leaning towards the BSN programs, I will probably apply everywhere and make the decision when (knock wood) I receive acceptance letters.

    If there are any alumni or current students of any NY schools, I'd love to hear about your experiences.

    Thanks very much!

    -Talldoll
  6. by   PediRN
    Forgot to mention...when I went to Columbia I had 100% tuition reimbursement. This made a big difference in my decision. I'm going to a state school now in part b/c I'm only getting $2500/year reimbursed.
  7. by   2banurse
    Well, it is my intention that when I finish my RN, I will move back up to NY (I can't wait!). The thing is, to work in Manhattan, most hospitals require a BSN. I myself am trying to decide if I should get my BSN down here or go back up to Long Island (my home) work and go to school for my BSN up there. I myself have been looking into Adelphi which seems to have a good nursing program. It is amazing the differences in salary between here in Florida and in NY, and believe me, the cost of living isn't all that different (Of course I'm comparing Long Island and Florida, not Manhattan).
  8. by   -jt
    SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn has an excellent accelerated program. I turned down the NYU program because at the time it began, they accelerated anyone with a batchelors degree in any field, made them into brand new RNs with a quick BSN and then allowed them, with no RN experience, to go directly into the MSN program without ever having worked as an RN. I dont know if that program still does that.

    For my initial RN, I went to CUNY-BMCC on Chambers St at WTC & had a great experience there. Over 98% of our graduating class passed the boards on the first try. The CUNY colleges are only about $4000/yr - I dont know which of them have accelerated programs. BMCC might.

    It doesnt make a difference which name school you go to. Everybody has to pass the same RN licensure exam no matter which school it is. You might want to look at the exam passing % rates of the schools recent graduating classes. That would be a better indicator of the quality of their program than the name would be.

    Id suggest going to a SUNY or CUNY college for your RN since that would be most economical for you. Since most of our hospital nurses are unionized with the New York State Nurses Assoc and our contracts provide for tuition reimbursement for additional education, once you are an RN & are working, you can go on for advanced degrees at whichever private more expensive colleges you want and have the hospital pay for it.
  9. by   2banurse
    -jt, first thank you for the information which is most appreciated. Second, is it possible to get a position in one of the NYC hospitals if you receive your RN through an ADN program, or is a BSN a must have. I do plan on getting my BSN, but I would love to be able to work in the city once I finish my ADN.

    Thanks in advance!
    Kris
  10. by   PediRN
    It is not currently mandatory for a BSN in NY, depends on how desperate the facility is.
  11. by   -jt
    <is it possible to get a position in one of the NYC hospitals if you receive your RN through an ADN program, or is a BSN a must have.>

    An RN license is what you need. Most staff RNs have an ADN & many go back to school part time, letting the hospital they work at full time pay the tutition for them getting a BSN and MSN/NP. Amounts paid by each facility may vary, depending on what the nurses at that facility decided to accept in their contract. Some may cap the number of credits per year. Some may cap the dollar amount per year at say $10,000, for instance. At my hospital, we negotiated 100% reimbursement up to 18 credits per year. Anyway, this is a question to ask the recruiter when you interview her during your job search. (along with what are the pt staffing ratios per RN). Theres a bedside nursing shortage - YOU interview the hospital, not the other way around

    And things like medical benefits, pensions, tuition reimbursement, shift differential should all be taken into account when deciding which deal is best for you and which job to take. Dont just look at the starting salary. You may have better reimbursements, and benefits at a hospital that offers a slightly lower base salary.

    To help start your job search, heres a list of NY hospitals where the nurses are represented by the New York State Nurses Assoc and have tutition reimbursement for continuing education and additional degrees:
    http://www.nysna.org/programs/EGW/facilities.htm
  12. by   2banurse
    You are a Godsend, -jt, thank you very much. I was going by what I saw on both the NYU Medical Center and Mount Sinai Hospital Websites, both of which seemed to emphasize BSN.

    Thanks, again,
    Kris
  13. by   SBUalum03
    Quote from talldollNYC
    Thank you PediRN and 2banurse for the good advice. It does seems like the best idea to do the 12month BSN program first - then figure out when and where to look at graduate programs.

    I've been researching all the schools in the NY area (Stonybrook, Binghamton, Pace, Hunter, Columbia, NYU, Adelphi, Mount St. Vincents, etc. etc. etc.). All the places with accelerated BSN degrees, or direct entry MSN programs. Though I am leaning towards the BSN programs, I will probably apply everywhere and make the decision when (knock wood) I receive acceptance letters.

    If there are any alumni or current students of any NY schools, I'd love to hear about your experiences.

    Thanks very much!

    -Talldoll
    I'm a Stony Brook alumi and I wished I would have gotten my degree in Nursing there instead I got my degree in psychology. I have friends in the Health Science program and they love it. The program is very competitive, the school has a great reputation, and it cost under $10,000/year. If you commute it's much cheaper. I say go for the SUNY school because you will get a good education and won't burn a hole in your pockets.
  14. by   theblondeone
    I went to school for my LPN at SUNY Delhi and am finishing my ADN while working through their partnership program at a local hospital. I go to school at the hospital (instructors come to us) 7a-7p on Wed and Thurs and work two 12's on a med surg unit as an LPN. SUNY Delhi has also partnered with Hartwick College for BSN and you are garaunteed acceptance into the BSN program when you finish your ADN at Delhi. Two of our local hospitals have tuition reimbursment programs for BSN at Hartwick College. SUNY Delhi is a tough nursing school, but I think it's worth it. They assume most ADN students will finish thru Hartwick and prepare you as though you were a BSN student. Tuition at SUNY Delhi is $2100 a semester and there is cheap housing available in the area if you need to live off campus. I'm a non-traditional student, so I commute.

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