Care plans- student nursing - page 7

Hi All, How have you been doing with Care Plans? Want to share any comments or opinions? Thanks, Marie:)... Read More

  1. by   mrs.ole
    Thanks, Marie!
    I really appreciate you responding to me!
    The LPN program where I am going is 11 months long...
    capping Dec.19th & graduation July 18th...
    I am as excited as I am overwhelmed!
  2. by   JAYNE :DANCE:
    I HATED MY CARE PLAN DAYS TOO........I HAD SOME CARE PLANS UPTO 50 PAGES YIKEEEEESSSS
    I ALSO HAD A BURNING PARTY ONCE I GRADUATED...............BUT I WILL BE BACK IN SCHOOL NEXT YEAR, AND THEY WILL BE BACK AGAIN.............
  3. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    I already had the burning party.

    Sent those evil spawn back to thier daddy

    I'm seriously considering dropping this do-do once I get my LPN and just working on a B.S. so I can go to P.A. school instead of NP. I can't see how three more years of care planning is going to build my diagnostic skills. I think it would simply damage my ability to put seemingly unrelated data together.

    It seems an organized way to learn how to put multidiscilplinary data together (clustering) to some,but to me it's just another example of the dumming-down of nursing curicculum in general and a sign of the etiology of the demise of nursing's goal of being regarded as a professional pursuit.

    Clearly,care planning is as contrived as psychology is indirect.

    I'm getting a very clear distinction between the medical model,and any other method of pt intervention that tries to improve upon it. I don't see how nursing can say they have a better mouse-trap from this point of view.
  4. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by mrs.ole
    Thanks, Marie!
    I really appreciate you responding to me!
    The LPN program where I am going is 11 months long...
    capping Dec.19th & graduation July 18th...
    I am as excited as I am overwhelmed!
    Well Shelly that is great ! Do you wear the caps after December or just for the ceremony? Good Luck with your Care Plans

    Marie
  5. by   Wyldeflower
    Our first careplan was due Friday, and ours are very similar to what Connie stated. We have to have our Nrsg Dx r/t as evidenced by, and all this info is gathered from the head to toe assessment. Then we have to have 2 short term goals and a long term goal. For each goal, we have to have 3 outcomes (what we want for the client...must be stated as client will___). Then, for each outcome, we have to have a nrsg intervention (what we will do for the clt to help them achieve the goal). Then for each intervention, we have to have a rationale with a source, and finally, evaluation. While I thought it was very time consuming (I stayed up until 2 am finishing), I found it very beneficial as a teaching tool. Writing a careplan has taught me more about critical thinking and how the nursing process works than what we are getting out of our textbooks. So for me, they are like a double-edged sword because most of our tests are on Fridays and I can't fathom the thought of having to do a careplan AND study! Our program is very hard! Each week at clinical builds on the last, and is a cumulative process. First week we did vital signs...next time it was vital signs and head to toe assessment...then is was vital signs, head to toe assessment and careplan (due on Friday). Next week is vital signs, head to toe assessment, careplan (due on Friday), bathing the client and making an occupied bed. I'm cringing at the thought of what will be added next!!
    Last edit by Wyldeflower on Oct 13, '02
  6. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by Wyldeflower
    Writing a careplan has taught me more about critical thinking and how the nursing process works than what we are getting out of our textbooks.
    Ditto !
  7. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Although I appreciate your positive attitudes,I have to call Bu**sh** on the use of the phrase "critical thinking skills".

    It's too easy to fall to that when we can't see the true meaning of something such as the need for anything above the most basic algebra for instance.

    I'm sorry to say it,but nursing school is obsessed with teaching us how to micromanage psychological
    tendencies and goes about it in a most complicated fashion.

    I'm sure it was very progressive in Ms Nightengale's era,but these times we live in call for patient turnover to be a little more focused on medical problems than with the supposed movement towards goals that patients will forget the moment they step back into reality.

    It's very simple................practicing nurses don't really diagnose anything,or have the time to ponder such things. When the patient seems in distress you find out why by looking or asking,and if the answer is not forthcoming you get them a different colored pill and move on to the next 89 tasks on your list.

    I'm glad for anybody that finds what they are doing rewarding,and I don't mean to try to discourage you from striving to obtain a greater understanding of patient care,but I am saying that this method is dysfunctional to any real application...............I wish it wasn't so..........but it is.

    Nursing is just not this deep. We should be concentrating on what we will be doing,not what some of us wish we will be doing.
  8. by   Wyldeflower
    Yes, I do see what you are saying about the critical thinking...I guess what I mean, is that it helps me to understand more about what's going on with the client...that what I can do for them while they are in my care makes a difference in their health. Some students in our class are already EMTs, LPNs, CNAs and such, but most of the class, like myself are brand new to all of this, and don't have the benefit of previous experience. I see your point, just wanted to clarify that for me, careplans have taught me more about body processess than my textbook or lectures because the book and lectures only cause me to memorize and regurgitate...careplans make me understand the why's and apply my thinking better. I was going to add a bit about the "real" world where we won't have time to worry about such detailed care plans, but my post was already long.
  9. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Well,

    I do come from a background of some healthcare experience. I see the need for you to explore cause and effect without that prior experience base,but remember that care planning began implementation over 30 years ago! Abilities that were once of value to patients laid up in a hospital for months at a time are now considered unworkable due to incredible pt turnover.

    You will simply point and click a stock care plan out of a database and never see it again. Your counterparts in report will probably never ask about anything you are learning. You may indeed help someone sometime with some sort of psychosocial bit of trivia,but when it's time to report all they will want to know is if you got all the work done:chuckle

    I just think it's dangerouse to develope someone's clinical philosophy around anything other than time management ,drug calculation,and med errors.

    All this psychology gives me a headache I just want to go drop nursing altogether. My experience is just the opposite from yours. I feel useless to provide the care that my patients need and find it excruciating to be studying a dynamic,undefined,and vague(to me) theory.

    If I had known all this before I invested all the time and money,I never would have enrolled. Maybe some of this is frustration from having a concept of what a nurse is from the viewpoint of having worked with them,and thinking that there would be more of a medical basis for our training.

    I do not want to become a social worker with a stethescope. I guess I was just disallusioned.
  10. by   dianacs
    I do not want to become a social worker with a stethescope. I guess I was just disallusioned.
    I see where you're coming from. Right now we're talking about all that therapeutic communication stuff, and I'm thinking, "if I wanted to be a counselor, that's what I would have done instead of nursing". Sometimes it all gets a little too touchy-feely for me. But I guess you never know what might come in handy down the road. Or so I tell myself.
  11. by   Alice McDonald
    I am currently a student in the LPN program at Platt College in Lawton, Oklahoma. I am having problems with writing my care plans. I would appreciate any input from you that would help me get better.
    Last edit by traumaRUs on May 4, '07 : Reason: deleted email addy
  12. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    I wanted to chime in real briefly here,

    As you can see from my above posts I am the last person on earth you would want careplan advice from. I actually just made stuff up at the end of my last rotation with a mixture of catchphrases from my care plan book................I got an "A":chuckle

    I have since quit nursing and am working towatds a bachelors of science in physician assistant.

    I want you to notice the date on the last posting so you don't feel bad when you get very little response. This thread has been bagged and tagged for awhile.
    Might try making a new thread, but the topic has been discussed before. Try a search on the board for "care plan".
  13. by   Bevi
    oh my....... i'm getting nervous reading all this care plan stuff.......

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