Advice to Nursing Students in Peds Rotation - page 4

Alright I have been on days now for about 3 months and have had a nursing student placed with me more often than not. I have a different one every day for the last 3 days. I work in peds heme onc and... Read More

  1. Visit  shelbs3 profile page
    0
    I feel like I should clarify myself on a few points. I do not expect students to follow me like glue however there have been multiple times where I have told the students that I am going to pass 9am meds (sometimes the only PO meds they will get on shift) and they tell me "Ok I will be here." PO meds may not be exciting but a big part of peds is getting compliance from your patients and giving PO meds is a great way to get some practice with that or at least see how they respond. I just want students to take advantage of every opportunity they are offered during their limited clinical time.

    As far as the dressing removal story I do absolutely want students to as questions! I do want them to think about the appropriate time to ask them however. Asking that question in front of the parent while we were in the removal process was not ideal. It makes mom think that we are not doing what is best for the patient and in that case what was best was to remove the dressing in a timely manner to reduce the amount of time we had to hold the patient down. (Think stages of development- toddlers hate being restrained, loosing control ect.) We did not yell at the student, the reason we had to raise our voices was because the patient was screaming and we wanted both the student and mom to hear the reasons behind why we chose not to use adhesive remover.
  2. Visit  i♥words profile page
    0
    Thanks for the tips. I just finished my first week of nursing school, and I start clinicals in a couple of weeks. Your advice applies to more than just peds. I'm really surprised that students would even be allowed to study at clinicals. My school has very strict rules about what we are allowed to bring and what we should be doing at clinicals. I should (theoretically) make time to document, but definitely not study. And I'm not going to be sitting when I could be giving meds! Also, the clinical instructor continually walks around the floor and monitors students. Honestly, it doesn't even make sense that a student would want to study while at clinicals. I mean, that's really the only way we can prove ourselves to our instructor (and ourselves). The first thing I learned in school was how to talk to patients in a compassionate, yet not pitying, way. Makes me wonder what this student's school is like.
  3. Visit  senvang2000 profile page
    0
    Thank you!! for so many great advice. I have peds clinical next weekend so I'll keep this in mind.
  4. Visit  JC1130 profile page
    0
    i Just started peds although my rotations start in the elementary school (vision, hearing, scoliosis screening) ill take you advice into consideration! Thanks!
  5. Visit  Ciale profile page
    3
    Quote from wordsofmymouth
    I'm really surprised that students would even be allowed to study at clinicals. My school has very strict rules about what we are allowed to bring and what we should be doing at clinicals. I should (theoretically) make time to document, but definitely not study.
    This is an interesting debate. "What's the point of clinical?" When I was going through school, I already worked in a hospital as did most of my classmates. There are definitely SKILLS to be learned during clinical (IV insertion, foley caths, meds...etc. etc.) but I feel like you only need to do a handful of these skills to "get the picture" and you'll get that experience when you're working on the floor as a nurse.

    That said, clinical (for me) was a time to learn how to "think like a nurse". What's going on with my patient (big picture)? What can I expect to do for my patient? What do the labs mean? What do my patient's s/s mean? A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    SE_BSN_RN, i♥words, and BrandiJones12 like this.
  6. Visit  BrandiJones12 profile page
    0
    Thank You!!
    I am new to this site and your article is one of the first that I have read, and the most informative. I am still completing my pre courses before apply for nursing school and would love to read more information from people that are in your same situations with nursing students. I would love to gather more insider information from your side of "teaching" so that I am aware of the requirments that are expected of me as a nursing student.
    I have found this very informational and hope to read more from you in the future.
    Thanks again!
  7. Visit  i♥words profile page
    1
    Quote from Ciale
    A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    Very good point. Probably, the skills will come (a little) easier than our abilities to think like a nurse. I guess when I read "studying" I thought of studying for a test, not studying the patient, but you helped me to see it differently. Learning about the patient and putting it all together into our nurse brains is really important.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  8. Visit  Satori77 profile page
    0
    This is some great advice, thank you for sharing your view. I bet Peds oncology is challenging, but very rewarding! Keep up the great work, you sound like an amazing nurse.
  9. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    2
    Quote from Ciale

    This is an interesting debate. "What's the point of clinical?" When I was going through school, I already worked in a hospital as did most of my classmates. There are definitely SKILLS to be learned during clinical (IV insertion, foley caths, meds...etc. etc.) but I feel like you only need to do a handful of these skills to "get the picture" and you'll get that experience when you're working on the floor as a nurse.

    That said, clinical (for me) was a time to learn how to "think like a nurse". What's going on with my patient (big picture)? What can I expect to do for my patient? What do the labs mean? What do my patient's s/s mean? A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    I definitely agree with this. I spent my first year of clinicals trying to help everyone as much as possible, and ended up spending my days in a to-do list way. That left me feeling completely lost as to the real art of nursing. Yay, I can make a bed and put in a catheter and answer call lights. But I could teach my 10 year old to do all of those things pretty quickly.

    When I'd pull my study materials out I had a feeling of guilt, like I should be up working. But by looking up labs, patho, care plans, etc, I AM working. I'm learning how to think like a nurse on the job, instead of going home and thinking about it all in retrospect.
    SE_BSN_RN and Satori77 like this.
  10. Visit  Mrs.Angel profile page
    0
    I haven't started nursing school yet, but this is GREAT advice. Although it should be common sense not to study in clinicals... tsk tsk
  11. Visit  ArrowRN profile page
    0
    What should we do when there is "down time"during our rotations. I started my rotations in OB and PEDs and sometimes the nurse I was assigned to would sit at the computer for long times or "disappear" from the unit altogether(postpartum).I dont know if it was because I was a male or she was just busy. I tried to ask questions but she seem to be preoccupied with charting so I just stopped asking. I completed my assessment but sometimes the patients get tired of student nurses taking up their time with head to toe assessment. What else can I do to improve my experience besides stand around at the nursing station? hated standing around
  12. Visit  allecait profile page
    0
    Thank you for your post and advice.

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