Accu Check question

  1. 1
    This may be the stupidest thing to ask...seeing as I am a senior nursing student. BUT...

    When a physician orders Accu Checks AC/HS. That is before meals and bedtime right? Why does it seem nurses do the checks sporadically? Like I don't see them done before breakfast...just lunch...they are not done before dinner either sometimes.

    And what time do you consider "bedtime" most patients sleep off and on all day during their hospital stay. So, on a 7a-7p shift when should Accu Checks be done the correct way?
    mitral likes this.
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Our unit does them at 6 11 17 2200 for achs. Depends on when meal trays come on your unit. Don't know why someone wouldn't check a diabetic patient before meals. Sometimes they are also ordered to be checked at 0300 so their sugar isn't super low at the 6 check. Hope this helps
  5. 0
    There is usually a facility policy that defines exactly what "AC & HS" means (the specific times of day). You should follow whatever the facility's policy is. If nurses you observe are doing the checks "sporadically" (like skipping some checks) that is an error the same as failing to give a medication as ordered. (However, it's likely the pre-breakfast checks are done by night shift -- that's pretty typical, and may be why you're not seeing those checks done.)

    "Bedtime" for purposes of BS checks and meds is defined by hospital policy -- 9 PM is pretty common, but there is some variation among facilities.
  6. 0
    The AC/HS times for Accuchecks at the facility where I work are as follows:

    6:30am, 11:30am, 4:30pm, 8:00pm

    If someone was working from 7am to 7pm (day shift), this person would not be responsible for obtaining the HS Accucheck. Instead, night shift (7pm to 7am) would be responsible for obtaining that particular glucometer reading.

    In addition, my facility has the 60-minute rule, which means that the nurse can obtain the Accucheck reading up to 60 minutes before or after it is scheduled while still being in compliance with the order. For example, the 8:00pm Accucheck could be completed as early as 7:00pm or as late as 9:00pm (60 minutes before or 60 minutes after).
  7. 0
    We did 0600, 1100, 1700, and 2100. I've never seen anyone skip it unless the patient was out for a test or procedure. And this was a pretty laid-back unit.
  8. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The AC/HS times for Accuchecks at the facility where I work are as follows:

    6:30am, 11:30am, 4:30pm, 8:00pm

    If someone was working from 7am to 7pm (day shift), this person would not be responsible for obtaining the HS Accucheck. Instead, night shift (7pm to 7am) would be responsible for obtaining that particular glucometer reading.

    In addition, my facility has the 60-minute rule, which means that the nurse can obtain the Accucheck reading up to 60 minutes before or after it is scheduled while still being in compliance with the order. For example, the 8:00pm Accucheck could be completed as early as 7:00pm or as late as 9:00pm (60 minutes before or 60 minutes after).
    Thanks, so much you cleared up alot.


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