40 something wondering which program?

  1. I am nearing 50 and am trying to decide between entering a ADN or a BSN program. How long does it take a nurse with a BSN degree to advance to position open only to those with the BSN degree? I see no point in spending additional years going for a higher degree when it could take many of experence to progress to a higher level once I am a nurse.

    I really want to know should I in my late 40's spend the additional money for advanced degrees?
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   crh5
    Quote from Maisie
    I am nearing 50 and am trying to decide between entering a ADN or a BSN program. How long does it take a nurse with a BSN degree to advance to position open only to those with the BSN degree? I see no point in spending additional years going for a higher degree when it could take many of experence to progress to a higher level once I am a nurse.

    I really want to know should I in my late 40's spend the additional money for advanced degrees?
    Everyone is different. For me, in my mid-40s, I opted for an associates degree. I wanted the flexibility that the local community college offers. I also wanted more clinical time, and in my area, the community college program offers more clinical time than the local university. I don't really feel the need to advance up into management, so an associates degree is fine. Again, where I live, other than nurse managers, or patient care directors, there isn't anywhere that is closed off to an associate's degree nurse. Critical care, ER, CCUs all take associates degree nurses here, probably due to the shortage. Most of the techs and EMTs around here go the associates degree route as well. I figure that if I get out there and work for awhile, and find that I want to continue my education, I'll do it, but the facility will be paying for it as a benefit...which they all do. I also already have a bachelor's degree...in a totally unrelated field...but can do an RN-MSN bridge program down the road. You just need to analyze your long term plan and current situation in terms of the time and money you have to offer a program. Good luck!
  4. by   llg
    A lot depends on where you live, your specific unit of employment, and the quality of your job performance. I have seen some recent BSN grads perform extremely well on the job and be promoted quickly (within 2 or 3 years) into BSN required positions. They impressed their supervisors and were rewarded for it.

    In some areas, the number of BSN's are so small that people are routinely promoted without it. In other areas, no one is promoted without it.

    So ... it will depend on local factors and your performance, making it a difficult question to give a firm answer to.

    llg
  5. by   peaceful
    Both programs will make you work super hard. You might as well come out with as high as of degree as possible.
  6. by   Havin' A Party!
    As an older student myself, I chose to go the ADN route and get out there ASAP.

    (Another reason for me was that I had two degrees already.)

    All the best to ya!
  7. by   stressgal
    Another "older" student here and second career as well. I am attending a local community college that shares the campus of a Big 10 college branch. I am enrolled in the community college's ADN program, am also taking university classes that will then transfer to yet another private college for my BSN/MSN. The good part about this is I am able to take the University courses at the community college prices, much cheaper per credit hour. When I graduate I will have my ADN degree, good enough to get started, and then will transfer into an ADN to MSN program at the private college( If that's what I still want to do). The best advice I can give is to get started and find out as much information about the schools you are interested in. Good luck!
  8. by   naggytabby
    as yet another older student I opted for a BSN/MSN program, as I already have a BA. I highly recommend it. Of course everyone is different, but I figured that if I am going to school I might as well do it altogether. Good luck!!
  9. by   Maisie
    Quote from LarryG
    As an older student myself, I chose to go the ADN route and get out there ASAP.

    (Another reason for me was that I had two degrees already.)

    All the best to ya!
    I also have a degree. Will this degree in Computer Science take the place of a BSN.
  10. by   crh5
    Quote from Maisie
    I also have a degree. Will this degree in Computer Science take the place of a BSN.
    For me, I have a Bachelor's Degree as well. The way it would work if I chose to get a BSN is that all the gen ed courses I took for my Bachelor's Degree would count and I would end up taking just the nursing courses, which would take about 2 years. So it would still be a BSN, it just would take about 1/2 the time it would take had I not already had a degree. The only courses other than the nursing lectures and clinicals I would have to take over the ASN program I'm in would be a nutrition class and a biomedical ethics class.
  11. by   live4today
    My humble advice would be to start college at a level that is comfortable for you -- whether that be Associate or Bachelor level -- and keep on going until you at least have your Masters.

    While educating yourself and working as a nurse, you'll gain whatever experiece employers may require for a particular job in management or higher. Once you've gained the required number of years EXPERIENCE for a certain management position, you'll have the degrees to go along with it, and you'll be financially compensated to a level of satisfaction in order to take care of yourself, especially if you end up divorced with no one else to help you financially with your living expenses.
  12. by   Tweety
    Both degrees are going to put you on the floor working hard as was mentioned before. How far you advance from there is up to you, your skills, your comfort level, your ambitions, your future goals and when you want to retire. I've seen nurses with BSNs go into good jobs fairly quickly, but that was their amibition. Others take their time.

    Personally, I'm going to have to work until I'm probably 70 as I was a late bloomer and unless I win the lottery or inherit big bucks I'm don't have much saved for retirement. I'm in my mid-40s and am going back for a BSN after working the floor for 15 years. I may yet work the floor for ten more, but not sure in my 60s this is what I want to be doing, so I'm going to give myself some more options by having the BSN.

    I always recommend those who have the opportunity to go ahead and get the BSN right away and get it out of the way.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 19, '04
  13. by   wonderbee
    I'm thinking like Tweety. At 51 I'll be graduating from an ADN program. I don't know how many years of floor nursing I have left in me. The BSN should provide some options. Why not go the ADN to BSN route? You get to work sooner and can even get your facility to kick in for your education.
  14. by   mauser
    I'm 47 - and in the diploma program of our hospital. When I am working as an RN (and getting experience), they will pay me to get my BSN. A good deal for me!

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