You Know You're an Old(er) Nurse If . . . - page 23

You know you're an older nurse if: 1. You remember working with nurses who wore caps. :nurse: 2. You remember nurses (and doctors) sitting at the nurses station drinking coffee and smoking... Read More

  1. by   jimthorp
    They still use the antiquated sticker system where I work as well.
  2. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from BMW10
    ... Surely someone here remembers those removable clip-on buttons. Or never, ever sitting in a patient's room---certainly not on the bed---under any circumstance, ever. Never.


    Clip on buttons?

    Oh, and to this day I feel GUILTY sitting on the patient's bed, even if the patient is someone I know and love ... I picture walking around with all these germies on my bum...
  3. by   tvccrn
    Quote from LEVODEVO
    CABG patients can be home in less than 2 weeks,back to grilled cheese sandwhiches and marlboro's..

    2 weeks??? Not sure where you work, but here they are home in 3 days.

    tvccrn
  4. by   prmenrs
    Quote from jimthorp
    They still use the antiquated sticker system where I work as well.

    We called them "Bingo" cards--when we filled one up (easy w/a really sick pt), we went up to the clerk's desk, put it on the counter and announced "Bingo"!

    I was very superstitious when starting an IV--didn't take any Bingo stickers off till I got it in.
  5. by   Barbara63
    I remember the clip on buttons. To this day I can't imagine sitting on a patient's bed....it's hard enough to sit in the chair while I give discharge instructions. In the ER most of the nurses call the physicians by their first name, but I can't do that....it was never allowed and some habits are really hard to break. How things have changed, and in some ways things have not changed at all. Thanks for this trip down memory lane.
    Barbara
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from prmenrs
    We called them "Bingo" cards--when we filled one up (easy w/a really sick pt), we went up to the clerk's desk, put it on the counter and announced "Bingo"!

    I was very superstitious when starting an IV--didn't take any Bingo stickers off till I got it in.

    We still do that lol.
  7. by   Bluehair
    Anyone remember waiting for pharmacy to mix your nitro drip... which meant they were crushing the nitro tablets to add to the iv solution?!!!
  8. by   rnsusan
    Were I work we still have:
    Gomco for intermittent suction
    Old crank beds
    6 of the rooms do not have a complete bathroom so a unit tub/shower is
    used for those rooms
    milk and molasses enemas work great

    As an older peds nurse I remember:
    making my own IV bags including continuos morphine drips before PCA
    pumps
    Glass IV bottles
    Bourbon and Bismuth for excoriated skin from severe diarrhea
    Mixing up formula on the floor from powder for the specialty formulas
    Written requesitions for labs and written lab results
    A parent had to prove to her insurance company that it would be cheaper to take her vent dependent child home than have the child live in the hospital for his entire life.
    I knew I was an older nurse when I took care of the child of one of my
    ex patients

    As a pediatric patient I remember:
    the Bird machine to help expand my lungs after surgery. Can someone
    explain to be in more detail about the machine
    Having 4 people to a room (now most expect private rooms)
    Using the suction cups for EKGs
    Paying daily for the TV (now most expect TV/VCR/DVD)
    The strong smell of alcohol as soon as you walked in the hospital
    When I read my medical record they discribed the catheter they used to do
    my cardiac cath when I was an infant as "special tipped catheter"
    I am assuming that they had to put something together for a 6lb baby
    at the time.
  9. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from rnsusan

    As a pediatric patient I remember:
    Glad you survived! I don't know what that Bird machine is but if you had a cardiac cath of some sort, sounds serious! Do you think that is partly why you are a nurse? I had a procedure when I was six and I do remember those sweet nurses - I think that is partly what influenced ME to be one!
  10. by   rnsusan
    Zoeboboey,

    I did go into nursing because of the wonderful nurses that I had as a child. As a 6 year old, I new who was a good nurse and who wasn't. All but just a couple of nurses were wonderful. I had my first heart surgery in '65 and my second in '72.
  11. by   Barbara63
    RN Susan,
    I'm not sure but I believe the Bird was the first ventilator developed for an infant. It was not volume dependant like the adult ones were. If it is the one I am thinking about it was developed by a Neonatologist in San Antonio Texas at the Air Force Hospital. He did a lot of research there and had to build the first one from parts he invented. Prior to that we used a ventilator called a Jade which was just a small version of the adults ones. To put a child on a ventilator before the Bird was pretty much the kiss of death because of all the lung damange they received. As was a tracheotomy for a child back in the 60's.....they only had a 50% survival rate. The equipment used for Pediatrics has changed radically thanks to NASA and their need for making everything small to fit in the space capsule.
    Barbara
  12. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from rnsusan
    Zoeboboey,

    I did go into nursing because of the wonderful nurses that I had as a child. As a 6 year old, I new who was a good nurse and who wasn't. All but just a couple of nurses were wonderful. I had my first heart surgery in '65 and my second in '72.
    Funny how that works - something awful turned into something good. Yes, I knew what a "good one" was vs a "bad one", and fortunately I don't recall too many bad ones.

    I also remember just before going under anesthesia the guy promising to show me kittens. He said that he had 10 of them, and we were counting them as I went to sleep. I never DID get to see them, the traitor! (Who says 6 years olds can't remember stuff?)!!!
  13. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from Barbara63
    RN Susan,
    I'm not sure but I believe the Bird was the first ventilator developed for an infant. It was not volume dependant like the adult ones were. If it is the one I am thinking about it was developed by a Neonatologist in San Antonio Texas at the Air Force Hospital. He did a lot of research there and had to build the first one from parts he invented. Prior to that we used a ventilator called a Jade which was just a small version of the adults ones. To put a child on a ventilator before the Bird was pretty much the kiss of death because of all the lung damange they received. As was a tracheotomy for a child back in the 60's.....they only had a 50% survival rate. The equipment used for Pediatrics has changed radically thanks to NASA and their need for making everything small to fit in the space capsule.
    Barbara
    Ding ding ding! You win the prize!



    Forrest M. Bird
    Born Jun 9 1921

    Fluid Control Device; Respirator; Pediatric Ventilator
    Respirator / Ventilator
    Patent Number(s) 3,068,856; 3,191,596; 3,842,828

    Inducted 1995


    On television every week in the 1960s, Dr. Kildare committed himself to making his patients better. But try as he might, some would still not respond to his treatment. At those times his hospital's slogan was, when all else fails, 'get the Bird.' 'The Bird' was a little green box which became familiar to hospital patients throughout the world after it was introduced in 1958.

    Invention Impact

    It was the first highly reliable, low-cost, mass-produced medical respirator in the world, and it was invented by Forrest Bird. The 'Babybird' respirator, introduced in 1970, quickly reduced infant mortality for those with respiratory problems from 70 percent to less than 10 percent worldwide.

    for more, see:

    Invent Now | Hall of Fame | Search | Inventor Profile


    It's funny cuz when I used to work with ventilators one of the alarms sounded like a "Bird" cheeping, lol...

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