Yes your highness...I mean doctor!! rant!!! - page 4

There is this one consultant in the hospital, he has a major reputation around the hospital as not being the most pleasant person to deal with. He treats the nursing staff like dirt and we have to... Read More

  1. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from emmycRN
    At my hospital there is a difficult surgeon who is very particular about everything, even where the chart is located when she makes rounds. She wants the chart always right outside the pt's room with certain information stuck to the outside with sticky notes. While she is standing there looking through the chart she will fire questions at you about lab values, ect. Like you have the chart memorized!!! On my first day on the unit she yelled at my preceptor because I had to go find the stuff (towels, suture removal kit, ect) to assist her like I was supposed to know she was on her way in and exactly what she was going to want to do when she got there. Also, she only wants certain nurses taking care of her patients and has made that perfectly clear. If she calls and one of her favorites is not there to speak to her she totally loses it and starts screaming. If I ever leave my current job it will be because of this particular doc who is impossible to work with. She definately thinks that all the nurses are there to cater to her every whim. Oh well. Maybe hospital administration will some day realize that the money disruptive surgeons/doctors bring in is offset by nursing turnover.
    That is an excellent point. I feel dumb that it never occurred to me. But apparently it hasn't occurred to a whole lot of people.

    I gave up long ago trying to help doctors who don't act right. They can get their own suture kits, forms, labs, etc. I just no longer have the patience and I never had the need to act like a doormat. Mean, immature people can and do change when they have to. I wonder how this has ben handled in other facilities? That is, how do you re-train doctors and get Admin to back you up?
  2. by   thumper55
    Over the years Doctor's come with good & less desirable attitudes. Once both of you get to know each other's style, things lighten up. But, if you run into an older, more traditional & formal Dr.; don't sweat the small stuff. Adjust to their unique styles. It truley saves alot of time & aggrivation. It's not harrassment to have expectations & certain protocol to be followed. Lighten up. Some feel this is showing them the respect that they feel comes with the territory. As a working relationship develops & they feel you're trying to anticipate their needs; trust me; it works wonders!
  3. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from thumper55
    Over the years Doctor's come with good & less desirable attitudes. Once both of you get to know each other's style, things lighten up. But, if you run into an older, more traditional & formal Dr.; don't sweat the small stuff. Adjust to their unique styles. It truley saves alot of time & aggrivation. It's not harrassment to have expectations & certain protocol to be followed. Lighten up. Some feel this is showing them the respect that they feel comes with the territory. As a working relationship develops & they feel you're trying to anticipate their needs; trust me; it works wonders!
    I totally disagree! You should never have to adjust to someone else's style if it means that they are demeaning you!! I don't care if it saves time or aggrivation!! And yes it is harrassment... To be called a "good little girl" is demeaning, degrading, disrespectful and harrassing.

    If anyone feels this is showing them respect, then respect is the last thing they deserve.

    It's obvious that this doc is using this tactic to make himself look better while making others seem inferior. In todays day and age, no one should have to accept that. I don't blame her for being upset, and I'd be very dissapointed if this were to continue.
  4. by   angelcharm
    Quote from luvmy3kids
    i totally disagree! you should never have to adjust to someone else's style if it means that they are demeaning you!! i don't care if it saves time or aggrivation!! and yes it is harrassment... to be called a "good little girl" is demeaning, degrading, disrespectful and harrassing.

    if anyone feels this is showing them respect, then respect is the last thing they deserve.

    it's obvious that this doc is using this tactic to make himself look better while making others seem inferior. in todays day and age, no one should have to accept that. i don't blame her for being upset, and i'd be very dissapointed if this were to continue.
    right. do not "give in" when u know u are right...

    and do not allow him to "manipulate" you

    respect begets respect
  5. by   muffie
    dear doctor stuff and such;
    respect is a two-way street
    now there's a good boy

    sincerely

    supernurse :roll
  6. by   hollyvk
    Oh my!


    We all agree this was inappropriate, sexist, demeaning, boorish behavior on the part of this consultant. My question is, "What did YOU do about it?"

    You would have been perfectly within your rights to have said to him, "I am here to assist you, but I am NOT your good girl and you will cease referring to me in that manner now!"

    NEVER be afraid to speak up for the respect you deserve from others. Your failure to say anything at the time communicated to this buffoon and all the others who were present that you accepted the behavior and didn't have a problem with it.

    While it's quite possible that rebuking his behavior may have escalated the situation, it's also equally possible that it would have shaped him up and changed the nature of any future interactions you have with him in a positve way. :smiley_ab

    Bottom line--your interests are much better served by speaking up about the situation at the time directly to the offender rather than ranting about it to peers after the fact. And if you need a psychological edge to make that move, just think of the offender as being a badly-behaved 3 year old, you certainly wouldn't put up with that behavior from your child. Address the issue and get past it, the offender should shape up and you'll feel better about yourself in the process. umpiron:

    HollyVK, RN, BSN, JD (yelled at by both doctors and judges, only dif is judges can put you in jail for contempt)

    Quote from irish_std/n
    There is this one consultant in the hospital, he has a major reputation around the hospital as not being the most pleasant person to deal with. He treats the nursing staff like dirt and we have to have everything perfect for when he makes his rounds or he completly freaks out.

    Yesterday it was my lucky duty to do his round. Anyway I go in and stand next to my patient while he discusses the pt with his team, he then states that he is going to examine the pt, proceeds to walk into me and says "kindly move to the other side of the bed like a good girl, didn;t they teach you in nursing school to always stand on the left hand side of the bed, its very important you know" so I move, and he's says to me ok I'll see the wound now theres a good girl... so I remove the dressing while he stands there tapping his foot. He goes out to wash his hands after the examination, and starts screaming at a random passerby about how there is no paper towel for him to dry his hands and that this is outragous where is the sister in charge etc...
    so after his little tantrum he come back in, shouts for a certain referal form and when one of his docs goes to get it he trys to call em back saying oh no the nurse will get that for you, you dont have to get it! anyway doc gets form, consultant shouts more demands, turns to me and says "ok you can dress pt up now like a good girl....well done you did ever so well!!

    aaaahhhhhh!!!:angryfire I thought the days of obeying the docs like they were God were well gone yet everyone practically falls to their knees when this guy comes around!! anyone ever experienced this? more importantly was anyone very taught to only stand on the left hand side of the bed when docs make their rounds!!!
  7. by   LucasRN
    Good Lord!!! yes I have encountered such a beast, but I found that his bark was worse than his bite. Don't accept that behavior.
  8. by   lorster
    Quote from TrudyRN
    That is an excellent point. I feel dumb that it never occurred to me. But apparently it hasn't occurred to a whole lot of people.

    I gave up long ago trying to help doctors who don't act right. They can get their own suture kits, forms, labs, etc. I just no longer have the patience and I never had the need to act like a doormat. Mean, immature people can and do change when they have to. I wonder how this has ben handled in other facilities? That is, how do you re-train doctors and get Admin to back you up?
    You don't. I posted a while back about a surgeon that majorly slandered me in a meeting. I asked the hospital to make him prove his allegations against me and he couldn't/wouldn't, didn't even acknowledge the hospital letter that was sent to him, demanding he prove it. They came to me a week or so later and told me they would not pursue it any further and asked me to "drop it". I am still mad at him and will not speak to him. Bottom line, these doctors bring in big money, we don't. And money talks. I lost much respect for my employer for not following through. Our nurses have been verbally and physically abused by doctors in our facility and nothing has ever been done about it. I'm not real sure that you can do anything about it and keep your job.
  9. by   lauralassie
    i know, it's difficult. i've become pretty good at confronting dr's when they say such things. i have no problem in saying things like. " that's ok, i always like to help people who can't help them selves...like dr's." or
    repeat an insulting order back to the dr and day, oh, is this dr "?" , this order is so strange , i thought i was talking to an intern. would you like to give me a more appropriate order. of course usually they hang up, call the manager or come in. but , i'm prepared to defend my self in those cases, even if i have to put the phone on speaker. i've learned the hard way not to let them intimadate me. just the other night an intern put an order on the front of the er chart that said repeat vital signs. he does this with every pt. most of our patients are on a continuous monitor, just to make things easier in the business of the er. (the pt's don't get charged,unless the ekg is truly needed). when he writes such things it makes it look as if we are to stupid to figure out the pt. need vitals after dilaudid or ntg. so to counter act this , i wrote in my nurses notes, pt on continuous monitoruing, q 15 min, prior to order. intern instructed on how to read monitor. umpiron:
  10. by   nuangel1
    Quote from thumper55
    Over the years Doctor's come with good & less desirable attitudes. Once both of you get to know each other's style, things lighten up. But, if you run into an older, more traditional & formal Dr.; don't sweat the small stuff. Adjust to their unique styles. It truley saves alot of time & aggrivation. It's not harrassment to have expectations & certain protocol to be followed. Lighten up. Some feel this is showing them the respect that they feel comes with the territory. As a working relationship develops & they feel you're trying to anticipate their needs; trust me; it works wonders!
    i could not disagree more .no ne and i repeat no one has the right to demean another especially not a so called professional.i don't care he's a dr
    Last edit by nuangel1 on Nov 15, '06
  11. by   nuangel1
    Quote from luvmy3kids
    I totally disagree! You should never have to adjust to someone else's style if it means that they are demeaning you!! I don't care if it saves time or aggrivation!! And yes it is harrassment... To be called a "good little girl" is demeaning, degrading, disrespectful and harrassing.

    If anyone feels this is showing them respect, then respect is the last thing they deserve.

    It's obvious that this doc is using this tactic to make himself look better while making others seem inferior. In todays day and age, no one should have to accept that. I don't blame her for being upset, and I'd be very dissapointed if this were to continue.
    absolutely ageree with you well said:yeahthat:
  12. by   lauralassie
    Quote from thumper55
    Over the years Doctor's come with good & less desirable attitudes. Once both of you get to know each other's style, things lighten up. But, if you run into an older, more traditional & formal Dr.; don't sweat the small stuff. Adjust to their unique styles. It truley saves alot of time & aggrivation. It's not harrassment to have expectations & certain protocol to be followed. Lighten up. Some feel this is showing them the respect that they feel comes with the territory. As a working relationship develops & they feel you're trying to anticipate their needs; trust me; it works wonders!

    Lighten up! forget it ..We need to stand up for ouselves!
  13. by   Barbiegirlnurse
    I think that we have all encountered physicians like the one discussed at the beginning of this thread. The physician that I worked with at the hospital, had such a reputation for being rude to nurses. As charge nurse, I would have to round with him, hold his clip board, and pretty much listen to him put the unit's nurses down in front of the patients. If anything was wrong or the patients had any problems, he would blame it on the nursing staff. He was especially crude to me, when he found out that I was going to NP school.

    We had a patient on the floor who was diabetic and in desperate need of foot care. Not only did he have PVD, but he had suffered frostbite to both of his feet in WWII. His toenails were long and thickened, in addition to several of them being ingrown. When making rounds with the doc, I took the patients TED hose off, as I often do, so that the doc could get a good look at the patient's lower extremities. When we left the room, I suggested to him that the patient could benefit from a consult referral with a foot specialist, as the condition of his feet was hindering his rehab progress. The doctor yelled at me in the hall in front of other nursing staff, patients, and visitors and told me not to make suggestions to him as to what he should do. When he wrote the orders for that patient, he wrote for "Nurse to provide diabetic footcare". Well, this didn't sit well with me, given the vunerabilty of the patient's feet, based on his past medical history. This added to the fact that most nurses don't due diabetic foot care (unless specially trained ), led me to call him and question the order. He said "Well, you wanted to be a doctor, here's your chance" and hung up on me. This infuriated me, so I called him again, hoping to explain to him my reasons for not wanting to follow through with the order. Again he yelled at me and hung up the phone. I notified my supervisor and then the head of nursing at the hospital to explain the situation. Instead of siding with me, they told me to follow through with the order or disciplinary action would be taken against me! Why is it that doctors or anybody for this matter are allowed to treat other professionals like this? On one hand my professional license would be at stake if I performed the ordered care and the patient suffered adverse consequences as a result (infection, amputation, etc.), on the other hand, if I didn't do it my job was at stake. Such a dilemma!

    I went ahead and performed the footcare after documenting in the patient's chart the conversations with the physician, my supervisor, and the head of nursing within the organization. I took special care while performing the foot care and no adverse events resulted. Still, after three years I wish that the hospital's nursing administration had sided with me. I feel it would have been in the best interest of the patient. Maybe if they had, the doc would have realized that his "Big bad wolf" tactics were unacceptable and just plain bad medical practice
    Last edit by Barbiegirlnurse on Jun 5, '07

close