Yacker Tracker in the NICU ??? - page 4

So they just put one of these things on our unit. It's like a stoplight that goes yellow to red when there is too much noise. We are a small NICU unit. Seriously? I'm pretty insulted to be... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from AliNajaCat
    When I had ICU orientees one of the first experiential exercises I had them do was sit just outside their patients' open doors (it was a converted m/s unit and there were actual doors on the single and 2-bed rooms) and write down every sound they heard for five minutes. Just five minutes. ...

    phones ringing
    suction
    conversation
    portable x-ray driver
    floor-waxing Zamboni-equivalent
    beepers
    call lights
    vents, IPPB
    beds and stretchers
    CSR carts
    monitors, pumps
    bubbling Pleurevacs
    trash cans being emptied
    laundry cart
    breakfast trays
    slamming metal charts

    Most of it we didn't even register, but as they were not familiar background noises to the orientees-- and certainly the patients-- it made quite an impact. The combination of sensory overload (all of the above plus pain, tubes and wires, lights, intrusive touch...) and comcomitant sensory deprivation (no normal clothing, same bed all the time, no normal interpersonal touching, no normal food, no fresh air or change of scenery...) was what made people crazy.
    What a great exercise! I'm sure it made an impression.
  2. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from NurseCard
    Wow, this is supposed to be used in classrooms, not in a workplace of adults!
    Just wow.
    I don't think they're worried about the volume of the work place of adults. I think they're worried about the volume of the healing place of patients.
  3. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from Rocknurse
    I kinda like the idea of this. I really hate noise and it ruins my concentration when there's too much noise, plus it's awful for the patients. I always worked hard to keep the noise levels down in the ICU at night so that patients could sleep. There are quite a few studies related to ICU psychosis and noise levels related to patients not getting ample sleep.


    My own personal pet peeve though is constant alarms that are ignored by nurses. I just can't understand that if your HR alarm is set at 100 and your patient's HR is 101 why you would just let that ring and ring. If they're known to be slightly tachy and are stable change your parameters slightly so that when something does go wrong someone might actually pay attention. It makes me batty! Constant noise is a stressor and negates actual important alarms. Alarm fatigue is a real thing, and a dangerous one,.
    I can't like this post enough.
  4. by   littlespitfire
    Oh yes, we have had that and also a microphone that records sound levels. At the nurses stations. We had to remind management that 1, our bed alarms set off the yacker tracker. As did med cart drawers. And phones. And 2, their choice of placement didn't take into account the a+ox1 screamers we have lined up in front of the nurses stations at night, since we do not have sitters. So the "noise" was often unavoidable.
  5. by   WVUITBSNRN2008
    My previous job (a tele floor) had a Yacker Tracker. It was so sensitive that it would go to yellow (sometimes red) just when opening/closing the rings of charts! So annoying! ๐Ÿ™„
  6. by   LaughingRN1979
    We have one in the ER that I work in. Of all places, an ER is not really meant to be a restful place! We get you in, fix what we can, and ship you out! It usually gets triggered by the tube system or by EMS when they bring in a patient. And of course it goes off a bit during the hubbub of a trauma!
  7. by   Been there,done that
    I have worked on 2 units with these stoplights. I was skeptical at first, but found myself paying attention when it turned red. It's only a visual cue that the noise level is getting out of hand.
    Don't take it personally. Anything that may keep the noise level down, so patients can rest.. is a good thing.
  8. by   Widner2929
    Several years ago we had one on our LDRP unit. I placed ours in the bathroom and our manager was the first one to find it! One of my best pranks.
  9. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from Widner2929
    Several years ago we had one on our LDRP unit. I placed ours in the bathroom and our manager was the first one to find it! One of my best pranks.
    That's pretty funny. Hope it got cleaned off afterward! It reminds me of a nurse I worked with who couldn't stand cows not in use being left unplugged and would take them and hide them in random areas...like the bathroom...to prove a point.
  10. by   Libby1987
    Does it alarm, give a print out of who was talking too loud, or a shock to the perpetrator (there you go Risk Manager ) ?

    I would be all over that, when the manager came in I would simply state, "That thing was lit up all night and you have got to do something about all of that cart noise!" (or whatever the source of the non human noise).
  11. by   Goldendoodle
    In addition to three Yacker Trackers, our director went so far as to have our clerk walk through the unit every two hours with a device to measure the noise that was made. That lasted about two weeks before it was determined that it wasn't staff making the noise, but patients, visitors, and equipment. It felt a little extreme.
  12. by   Steffy44
    Our hospital used these stupid things for about 3 months. They were horrible. They put ours within 2 feet of the tele monitor on our floor and in PCCU...wanna guess how many times an hour ours hit red. ๐Ÿ˜‚
  13. by   Steffy44
    Quote from Rocknurse
    I kinda like the idea of this. I really hate noise and it ruins my concentration when there's too much noise, plus it's awful for the patients. I always worked hard to keep the noise levels down in the ICU at night so that patients could sleep. There are quite a few studies related to ICU psychosis and noise levels related to patients not getting ample sleep.


    My own personal pet peeve though is constant alarms that are ignored by nurses. I just can't understand that if your HR alarm is set at 100 and your patient's HR is 101 why you would just let that ring and ring. If they're known to be slightly tachy and are stable change your parameters slightly so that when something does go wrong someone might actually pay attention. It makes me batty! Constant noise is a stressor and negates actual important alarms. Alarm fatigue is a real thing, and a dangerous one,.
    My floor is HORRIBLE for alarms. With tele and bed alarms I find by the end of shift you are deaf to it. I'm not sure what the answer is since we have so many who need to be on bed alarms and tele. My pet peeve is nurses not responding to beeping iv's. If I can hear it down the hall and I have to walk 200 feet to find it...it kind of pisses me off to find the nurse in charge of the patient reviewing FB in the nurses station 5 feet from the door.

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