Working with interns...can you help?

  1. I will be starting a new job at a teaching hospital and have never worked with interns. They have just hired a ton of new ones. Will you give me some pointers on how best to work with them/what I can expect? Thanks a million in advance.
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   Katnip
    Remember, they are new too. They are constantly getting chewed out by their superiors. Some may try to take it out on you. Most know they don't know anything and will often be very greatful for help from nurses.

    Last year I started right after the new batch of residents came in. They were terrified of nurses. Not sure what they were told in medical school about us.

    Anyway, teach those who are willing to be taught. But don't take any crap from those who are too cocky for their own good.

    Oops. Did you mean medical interns or nursing interns?
  4. by   CHATSDALE
    maddie #1 rule never let them see you sweat----seriously some are open and willing to do their job and some are going to be resentful and think that they are smarter than you or anyone above them they are hard to work with but that is life hold your own they will be gone soon
  5. by   maddiecat
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    maddie #1 rule never let them see you sweat----seriously some are open and willing to do their job and some are going to be resentful and think that they are smarter than you or anyone above them they are hard to work with but that is life hold your own they will be gone soon
    That brings up a question...how long do they stay?
  6. by   maddiecat
    Quote from cyberkat
    Remember, they are new too. They are constantly getting chewed out by their superiors. Some may try to take it out on you. Most know they don't know anything and will often be very greatful for help from nurses.

    Last year I started right after the new batch of residents came in. They were terrified of nurses. Not sure what they were told in medical school about us.

    Anyway, teach those who are willing to be taught. But don't take any crap from those who are too cocky for their own good.

    Oops. Did you mean medical interns or nursing interns?
    Sorry. Medical...
  7. by   Katnip
    Interns turn into 1st year residents. First year residents turn into 2nd year residents.

    They can stay for years. Surgicad, they can be there 5 years. Medical just a few. Each year residents are up for contract renewal. When it comes to chiefs, only a few are chosen and the remaning have to seek out other hospitals.
  8. by   rjflyn
    Actually interns are first year residents. How long they stay is dependent on how long the residency is for that partiulary medical specialty. Here where i work ER is 4yrs, peds 3 years, internal med and family practice 3 yrs. Surgery 5yrs, orthopedic surgery i think is 6yrs and nerosurgery is like 7yrs. Thats not to mention fellows which is comparable to a residency after a residency ie specializing even further like peds surgery, peds icu, cardiothorasic surgery, invasive cardiology ect ect.

  9. by   Katnip
    You're right. Interns=1st years. I was thinking of the gaggle of med students we have running around.
  10. by   llg
    Quote from cyberkat
    Remember, they are new too. They are constantly getting chewed out by their superiors. Some may try to take it out on you. Most know they don't know anything and will often be very greatful for help from nurses.
    Last year I started right after the new batch of residents came in. They were terrified of nurses. Not sure what they were told in medical school about us.
    Anyway, teach those who are willing to be taught. But don't take any crap from those who are too cocky for their own good.
    Oops. Did you mean medical interns or nursing interns?
    I really liked this answer. Many (I like to think most ...) of the residents/interns are really nice people who just happened to be under a lot of stress. There is no reason to treat them badly. We nurses should be helping them to learn and to grow and to further develop into terrific attending physicians.

    Some are too cocky for their own good ... and we need to also help them continue to develop as physicians. That means helping them learn to maintain positive relationships with the nurses.

    Good or bad ... everyone on the team should be helping each other to develop more skills and working towards positive, productive relationships. Sometimes that means taking a cocky, obnoxious resident down a peg or two ... but more often than not, it means providing them with some positive, gently guidance in the right direction.

    Teach them that the nurses can be their greatest asset and they will show respect for nurses throughout their career.

    Good luck,
    llg
  11. by   maddiecat
    Thank you all for your great responses? I just hope I can remember all their names?
  12. by   LCAlpn
    My best and favorite years in nursing took place in teaching hospitals.
    Rarely were interns a "problem". Once in awhile someone would have a horrible personality and ',sad to say,they happened to be nurses before med school. Go figure!
  13. by   classicdame
    This is a great opportunity to teach someone that nurses have a valuable role in patient care. Running interference for them, letting them know you are a team player and providing helpful information will teach them a lot. Yes, you are a teacher. They are very insecure. Just imagine getting out of nursing school with the authority to write scripts and not having any patient care experience. Scary.
  14. by   ZippyGBR
    it's probablysomething to ask us brits aobut as unless we work in private areas only a lot of our time is pent interacting with juniors, epsecially given that the shortest speciality training i nthe Uk is the GPVTS for primary care docs and that's sually at least 2 years ontop of the foundation years - other specialities are at least 4-6 years on top of the 2 foundation years and historically due to various log jams i nthe system a lot longer with people spending extra years as SHOs or having none training programme middle grade posts while waiting for a higher specialist training 'number'

    dealing with FY1 / interns is about supportign them in an unobstrusive manner anf making sure they seek w hlep when they need it ... most FY1s realise quickly that staying o nthe right side of the nurses is a good idea as doctors need nurses more than nurses need doctors ...

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