working in the ER as a new grad.

  1. I'll be graduating next month with my ADN and really want to work in the ER. I've been a LPN for the past 6 years and have some good experience, but what does everyone think about a new grad starting out working in the ER?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   orrnlori
    We start new grads in our ED every single year, we have a good internship and I think that the new RN's do well over all. We also hire right into the ICU's and the OR. I think it all depends on the hospital having a good training program and good preceptors. Teaching hospitals tend to do this the best.
  4. by   fab4fan
    I think it's a bad idea...always have, always will. You have no experience to fall back on, no skills; kind of like builiding a house without a foundation.

    I suppose if the hosp had a REALLY good internship that lasted a LONG time, then MAYBE it would be all right. But from what I've seen, usually they cut you loose after 8 weeks, then it's up to the staff to provide all the training.

    It can be overwhelming for an exp. nurse to deal with the wide variety of ages and dx that come through the ED; I can't imagine doing it with no exp. I've also noticed that a lot of new grads have the attitude that they want the ED to avoid certain aspects of M/S; believe me, you will still deal with that stuff in the ED.

    And before anyone flames me for being an old crone nurse, I felt that way even as a new grad, many years ago. And it's just my opinion, FWIW.
  5. by   fab4fan
    And when I say no exp., I mean no exp as an RN. Certainly LPN exp would help in some respects, but it's not the same.
  6. by   Fivestar22
    I think that if you have the drive to be an ER nurse then you should go for it! Many hospitals have excellent training programs, and the ones that don't usually don't hire new grads into the ER. I think that its better to start in an area that you want to work in rather then work some where, where you won't be satisifed. Most nurses agree that its easier to teach a puppy, and you can't train an old dog new tricks. As in its better to train a new grad, then it is to try and retrain a nurse who is set in her own ways. Good luck and I hope you succeed.

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  7. by   orrnlori
    Again, I think it just depends on the hospital. My hospital trains OR nurses for 7 months. I believe the ED is 6 months. It's intensive mini-nursing school.
  8. by   happystudent
    Quote from fab4fan
    I think it's a bad idea...always have, always will. You have no experience to fall back on, no skills; kind of like builiding a house without a foundation.

    I suppose if the hosp had a REALLY good internship that lasted a LONG time, then MAYBE it would be all right. But from what I've seen, usually they cut you loose after 8 weeks, then it's up to the staff to provide all the training.

    It can be overwhelming for an exp. nurse to deal with the wide variety of ages and dx that come through the ED; I can't imagine doing it with no exp. I've also noticed that a lot of new grads have the attitude that they want the ED to avoid certain aspects of M/S; believe me, you will still deal with that stuff in the ED.

    And before anyone flames me for being an old crone nurse, I felt that way even as a new grad, many years ago. And it's just my opinion, FWIW.
    As a prospective new grad ED nurse........I agree with building a foundation to grow on, BUT, I also feel that if there is an appropriate orientation and preceptor, a new grad should do fine. IMHO, i know that I will miss out on some basics, like being able to prioritize effectively in the beginning. In the Ed, it a whole new ball game. In my clinicals, Ive had 3 pts (M/S)all with different dx's and I found that the prioritizing came with assessments and med administration.So I have a pretty good idea of what to do. Right now I work as a tech in a level 1 and I see first hand what it is like for the nurses.Its not like Im sitting at home watching ER and saying, "MAn thats cool! I wanna be a ER nurse when I grow up!!!" lol
    I know that it will be hard and overwhelming, but I am DETERMINED to be the best Ed RN I can. I just hope that I am assigned to a fabulous preceptor!!!
    Yes, there are pros and cons but some people who have worked M/S for a year and specialize have said that they had to "retrain" anyway on their new floor.
    I guess its all in how much time and effort is put in by the new nurse and seasoned
  9. by   Tweety
    I agree that with a good preceptorship your experience as an LPN is plenty good enough. If that's your goal, then go for it.

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