will they call me???

  1. HI guys! I just applied to a position for Surgical Recovery, I am tired of the 7 patients a piece with family members in the room 10 hours a day.
    I am wondering if they will call me. I have one year experience with ventilators. Here in FLorida they hire new Grads in all specialties. They told me they would put me through a critical care class. I just want to do something else so bad.
    how's home health??
    thanks
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   dynamicfigure
    Awhile ago someone posted a funny but true statement, they said that the nursing shortage is due in no small part to the inability of the HR (Human Resource) departments in hospitals.

    As a recruiter I work with more healthcare HR departments then I care to recall. Most of them share a common thread of being so overworked, distracted, or stressed in general that many neglect to get back to qualified nurses in a timely manner. The best piece of advice that I have to overcome this (and it overcomes many weaknesses in your resume to) is to call them up in person. In today's era of voice mail, email, computers and everything there is no subsitute for personal touch of actually talking with someone. It forces the hiring manager to find your resume and look at it, and during that call you can also express your interest and related experience.

    The call does not need to be long or anything to stress over, but rather a friendly "hi, I am a nurse who had just submitted my resume and wanted to see if you had recieved it" conversation. That can be followed by a "when do you expect to make a decision" question if they say they will review it and get back to you. Being friendly, and making this contact is something that will win you enormous points and if done right you can open doors that would otherwise have remained closed. Additionally, if you follow-up on the call with another one after their review process is over, you can often get a firm yes we are interested, or at the least a, "better luck next time" responce. I personally prefer this because it gives you closure one way or another and let's you know what happened vs. sitting in the lurch wondering if they ever recieved your resume, if they will ever call, if you are qualified enough, and all the other vicious questions that can go through your mind when you don't know the outcome applying to a job.
  4. by   cactus wren
    I~d also call the unit Manager, sometimes HR doesn`t even get around to telling them that someone has applied....Good luck !!!
  5. by   sphinx
    In the last line you threw in a question about "how's home health".......I have to tell you, it will not be "easier", although it may be a rewarding career change. I enjoy the flexibility and independence, and espescially the time to really get to know my patients. There is a LOT of paperwork.When I heard that, I figured "aww, no problem", cuz I'm one of those people who actually likes paperworky type of stuff. But the amount of stuff you have to learn and do is unreal. The medicare regs are unbeleievable. Insurance can be a nightmare, even if not medicare. (luckily I do mostly OB, so don't have to do medicare most times). Anyway, There are many, amny good thiings about home care, but what I have found is that I see patients throughout the day, and since I am so busy during the day between patient care, managing their care (calling social workers, physical therapists, doctors, insurance companies), that the paperwork waits till evenings. So I sit there every night doing my paperwork. It's gotten to where I have days where it seems all I do is work, eat and sleep.
    As for this other job you are looking into, it sounds great! If you are truly iinterested in going that route, by all means, call *them*! A quick polite phone call is all it takes, and it might even shine positively in your favor.
    Good luck in whatever you do!!!
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Don't wait; follow up! If you want that job, go after it! Good luck!

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