Why did you become a nurse instead of a doctor?

  1. 0 I'm just curious about what made you decide to become a nurse instead of a doctor.Or did becoming a doctor never even cross your mind?
    It took me a while to figure out that I wanted to work in the medical field. After that was done I only had to figure out in what profession I wanted to be in. I always thought it would be great to become a doctor but although I think I have the potential to be a good doctor and would like their work, I decided that nursing was the better way for me. Some of the reasons for that were that I liked the schedules better, schooling takes less time, it's easier to get into the schools and I'm not willing to give up my family life or marriage for a career as a doctor.

    It would be intersting to hear why you guys think that nursing is the better career (or not?!)
  2. Visit  Anaya_1de profile page

    About Anaya_1de

    From 'Florida'; 31 Years Old; Joined Oct '03; Posts: 28; Likes: 6.

    53 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Gompers profile page
    0
    I never wanted to be a doctor, for many many reasons. Mainly, I never wanted the kind of stress and responisibility they have. Their hours suck. And they see so many patients a day, regardless of their specialty, that it's all kind of a blur, in my opinion. I don't want to be a nurse practitioner for the same reasons. I never intended to be the one calling the shots.

    I always wanted to be the one at the bedside, caring for patients one-on-one, being there for families, and doing everything I could to help them.

    Being a doctor or an NP, to me, is about power. It's about being the one in charge, the one who makes the life or death decisions, the one who gets all the glory. And I've never wanted that.
  4. Visit  Tweety profile page
    1
    Becoming a doctor takes too much time, too much energery and too much money. If I'm honest, I would have at one time wanted to be a doctor. However, in no way did I "settle" for nursing. I become a nurse for the patient contact, to help people, etc. and have no regrets. If I had time and money, I still probably would become a nurse.
    Teacup Pom likes this.
  5. Visit  Rollins profile page
    0
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    Becoming a doctor takes too much time, too much energery and too much money. If I'm honest, I would have at one time wanted to be a doctor. However, in no way did I "settle" for nursing. I become a nurse for the patient contact, to help people, etc. and have no regrets. If I had time and money, I still probably would become a nurse.
    I want to have time with my family, that's the #1 thing for me. To be able to come home everynight, go to my son's T-Ball games, movies with my wife, ect. I wouldn't want to take the time for that much school, despite the money or privledge of being "Doctor". Some things are just too important to me.
  6. Visit  Lee RN EMT-P profile page
    0
    Did not want the head ache. My brother is the MD. My mother was a nurse. Maybe I wanted to follow in her foot setps. I was a pilot for many years, and worked as a medic in a large FL hospital ED. loved the patient care and went back to school to be a nurse. I love my job and would not change it. As for why a nurse VS doctor. who cares I take care of sick and needy people who need me.

    Thats why we all do it ???:hatparty:
  7. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
    2
    I never wanted to be a doctor. Nursing is an art as much as a science, and practiced with skill, it's a fascinating career. Nursing is different from doctoring, and is definitely (dare I say this?) the more intuitive specialty. I'm always amazed at how well using the nursing process works for a patient. But there is truly a relationship between nurse and patient that actually does encourage health in the patient.

    Doctors do not usually participate in this process. Their contribution is more of a scientific nature: "Lab X says this, so we'll treat it thusly."

    Nurses treat the whole patient. Nurses think beyond the math. Not that we don't include it, we do. But we also realize the healing properties of a cup of hot tea and a graham cracker after a stressful 9 hours in the ER along with that IVP of Morphine.

    I've had postop hip patients who c/o pain and were completely miserable until I repositioned them and straightened their bedding. Then--no need for a pain medication. A doc, on the other hand, would've prescribed a painkiller and ignored the warnings coming from the patient's skin!
    Teacup Pom and freesia29 like this.
  8. Visit  HappyNurse2005 profile page
    1
    Because I wanted to take care of hte patient, not solely the disease.
    banchan likes this.
  9. Visit  KrisRNwannabe profile page
    3
    Never wanted to be a doc. the money it costs to go, the hours the residents work, the little money they make for the first few years, the high cost of malpractice insurance. thought just never crossed my mind. I have a friend who is just finishing residence. I think she has so many student loans they come in multiple envelops. i thought it was over a hundred thousand but now she tells me they are closer to 200 thousand. I feel bad for her. for me I am happy JUST BEING A NURSE. I think nurses get more respect than doctors do. my pts complain all day that there doctor is never around. especially on discharge day. they want to go at the butt crack of dawn and then the doctors show up late in the afternoon. i am still a student, but every day when I leave clinical, i usually go and say good bye to all my patients and I here "you were so good to me today" or "you are going to be such a good nurse" or "I wish you all the luck, you are so good at this". After my first ever clinical day, I went to say goodbye to my little old lady, she took my hand and told me no one has ever taken such good care of her and that i was an excellant nurse. I had tears in my eyes when i told her how much that meant to me. That is what it is all about. how many docs get that?
    kris
  10. Visit  energizerbunny05 profile page
    0
    I do believe there is a sense of compassion that "some" nurses not all possess. But i have to say that i have encountered many nasty need an attitude adjusted nurses.The same thing occurs with docs some are such sweethearts and others are detached lacking human emotion. for the op i think that u should really do some soul searching and decide whether nursing is something that would fulfill you on a personal level because remember this a career u r choosing. Personally , i am graduating in december with my bsn and i start med school in august. My mother really wants me to be a nurse but i am thirsty for so much more knowledge therefore i am continuing on to med school. I feel like medicine is more for me than nursing for multiple reasons. I want autonomy most of all i have a desire to learn. the fact is yes it takes sacrifice but who said that anything comes easy. Go with what is in your heart.
  11. Visit  Antikigirl profile page
    0
    Wowie, guess I am the minority! I really wanted to go MD...but I got a grant to become a nurse, and well...actually since I was 28, I thought I maybe if I wanted to become an MD I should have started a bit eariler (6-8 years of school didn't sound all that appealing at that point..LOL! I mean residencies at what..my early 30's...just wasn't floating well with me, didn't think I would have the time because I hoped by then I would be starting a family and not stuck in hospital all day and night).

    Then I got to know Docs better, and what they go through...I think I made a great choice for me. Plus, I felt that if I really wanted more of that kind of role, I could go for NP! And I must say the NP's that I have met and worked with are GREAT, and great role models .

    LOL, but truth be told...I didn't want to work with humans..LOL! I wanted to be a vet since I was 5! Still do ...
  12. Visit  eltrip profile page
    2
    I chose to not attend medical school (despite the suggestion by a doc I once worked with) because I wanted to have a life. That was 13 years ago and I have yet to regret my decision. However, I think I understand this perspective:

    Quote from energizerbunny05
    i am thirsty for so much more knowledge
    This is why I want to become an FNP. My higher education, though, may have to wait until my family needs me a little less. This is also why I'm studying other subjects on my own in the meantime (music theory, piano, taekwondo, among other things). My thirst for knowledge is not limited to that related to my career.

    The more I learn, the more I realize that I don't know!
    freesia29 and Sugar-Phosphate like this.
  13. Visit  energizerbunny05 profile page
    0
    Quote from eltrip
    I chose to not attend medical school (despite the suggestion by a doc I once worked with) because I wanted to have a life. That was 13 years ago and I have yet to regret my decision. However, I think I understand this perspective:



    This is why I want to become an FNP. My higher education, though, may have to wait until my family needs me a little less. This is also why I'm studying other subjects on my own in the meantime (music theory, piano, taekwondo, among other things). My thirst for knowledge is not limited to that related to my career.

    The more I learn, the more I realize that I don't know!
    I am sure many of us are thirsty for knowledge but time constraints or responsibilty with other things prevent us from acquiring it. I just think things can be done all it takes is motivation and preserverance. The fact is that being a doc is something i have always dreamed of. I am married with two kids and I believe i can fulfill my dreams.I will sacrifice some of my time and money but, the reward is more than worth it at least for me personally.
  14. Visit  llg profile page
    6
    My father was a physician -- a small town doc who took care of the whole patient, not just the disease, had long-standing relationships with them, etc. He had the kind of emotional connection with his patients that a lot of physicians today do not have. He was very much beloved by our town.

    A lot of people tried to convince me to go to medical school instead of nursing school, but I never seriously considered it. Having seen the toll that practicing that kind of medicine took on my father and many of his colleagues, it was not a lifestyle that interested me. Also, he and most of his friends encouraged me to go to nursing school -- to get a graduate degree and be one of those "specialized nurses" as they used to call them -- those nurses who have flexible hours, nice paychecks, etc. They often felt trapped by their careers and by their committments -- owning practices, employing staff, etc. -- difficult to move from one place to another, almost impossible to switch specialties -- difficult to be flexible with work hours, having to work on holidays, nights, etc. even though you have years of experience, etc. They told me that nurses with advanced educations have more flexibility and that was important to me.

    That's what I did. I got a BSN at 22, an MSN at 26, and a PhD in nursing at 41. I've had the intellectual stimulation I need through all of my graduate study and through my jobs as a CNS, Staff Development Educator, and Program Coordinator. I have outrageously flexible hours: I come and go as I please. I make a good salary. I had only a couple of small student loans for graduate school. I have no regrets about choosing nursing.

    llg

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