What is RN 1, 2, and 3? What is RN 1, 2, and 3? | allnurses

What is RN 1, 2, and 3?

  1. 0 I give up. I look for a job, they post information regarding the RN 1, or 2, or 3, as if I should know what each one entails. I don't. I confess. I have no idea what they mean, I never did.

    Would anyone be so kind as to educate me? Thanks.
  2. 6 Comments

  3. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    1
    The ranking could be the opposite in meaning for different places. Just a ranking in terms of seniority, responsibility, pay. If you have any questions, simply call the human resources number and ask what is what. You would probably want to insure you are applying for the correct level that you are qualified for. Good luck in your job hunt.
    scoochy likes this.
  4. Visit  pinkiepie_RN profile page
    1
    Typically these positions are based on what is known as a "clinical ladder". Nurse I may have less than 12-16 months experience, Nurse II may have 2 years experience, Nurse III may have 3+ years experience. Clinical ladders can also include things like shared governance and research projects. I think for applicants, it's typically used when asking for experience. HTH
    scoochy likes this.
  5. Visit  Davey Do profile page
    0
    A little explanation by the posting entities would be helpful, wouldn't it scrubberRN?

    I can only tell you that the State of Illinois, when employed by the State, classifies nurses according to their amount of experience and/or education. For example, a new nurse to a specified area is an RN I, two years experience RN II, etc.

    Your best bet would be to contact the source.

    Good luck to you.
  6. Visit  LuvatravelRN profile page
    1
    Quote from scrubberRN
    I give up. I look for a job, they post information regarding the RN 1, or 2, or 3, as if I should know what each one entails. I don't. I confess. I have no idea what they mean, I never did.

    Would anyone be so kind as to educate me? Thanks.

    From what I understand RN I would be like an entry level nurse. A RN I becomes an RN 2 after having demonstrated an acceptable level of competency after a year's experience. RN 3's typically are experienced and are involved in more on the unit. For example, when I first started in the NICU, I was an RN I and then after my 1- year evaluation I became an RN 2. Most RN 3's on my unit are charge nurses, PICC team members, on the Stork team, etc. - they are seasoned and experienced nurses! Does this make sense????

    I agree it would help if job descripts. explained this a little better
    are n likes this.
  7. Visit  BeSeNe profile page
    0
    Quote from Davey Do
    A little explanation by the posting entities would be helpful, wouldn't it scrubberRN?

    I can only tell you that the State of Illinois, when employed by the State, classifies nurses according to their amount of experience and/or education. For example, a new nurse to a specified area is an RN I, two years experience RN II, etc.

    Your best bet would be to contact the source.

    Good luck to you.
    you are correct somewhat. A long story short, it's the level of education. A nurse use to be a nurse but not anymore. Level I-III is a certification add on. Where done by state or by job. Some places offer this and some don't but it's getting more popular. A LPN use to be able to start to work and then get iv certified. Some now as the above with RN. "Advance practice LPN..RN I,II,III so on and so on. Take Le Bonheur. Rarely with they hire just a RN I now. Not enough education. Most jobs there in my town don't want to hire no less than BSN.. In my Le Bonheur I work at this is the exact meaning of the above question
  8. Visit  Sarah918 profile page
    0
    I know this is an old question but if you are like me you are reading all of these and trying to work your way through an inconsistent, bureaucratic web. A bit of advice, try to come in boarded as high as you can. Make sure to fill out VerPro and include all nursing experience- leave nothing out. If you don't agree with the boarding try to appeal.

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