vet techs using the term nurse - page 8

what do you guys think of the growing controversy of vet techs calling themselves nurses?... Read More

  1. by   fab4fan
    The post about RN's treating animals made me think of something that happened to me a few years ago.

    My cat got sick and needed to stay overnight at the animal hosp. for s.c. IV's. The next day, the vet offered me the option of taking him home and doing the last day of infusions myself because I was a nurse (not my idea...his).

    I figured, "Well, I guess it won't be that hard to manage." After all, he was still a little slow from being sick.

    Ha ha ha. Fifteen minutes later, blood dripping everywhere (mine, not his), I decided I would much rather put an IV in a 2y old than an elderly cat. He seemed to have 16 paws, five heads, and for a cat that had several teeth extracted, plenty of teeth left over.
    I called the vet and said, "If he can fight me that hard, then I think it probably won't kill him to skip the last day of infusions."

    The vet agreed, and eventually my cat and I were on speaking terms again.

    (Sorry about that messed up post!)
    Last edit by fab4fan on Jan 4, '03
  2. by   Q.
    Originally posted by RN2B2005
    The problem is, when an R.N. or M.D. decides to attempt home veterinary practise, they tend to have more supplies (IV caths, meds, fluids) at their disposal and thus can wreak more damage on their pet before bringing it in for proper care.
    Your story was heart-breaking and to say the least, shocking. I couldn't tell in your response if you answered Deb's question on if this is a "general rule" or not.

    The only thing is I don't have IV supplies at home and I don't know many RNs who do and it's pretty hard to leave work with tubing, a couple liters of fluid and some catheters without at least being looked at funny. I'd imagine if ANY nurse is stealing supplies like this, most likely he/she is questionable to begin with.
  3. by   sbic56
    I already posted my thoughts on this on the other thread, but I have to say that to call those who want to call themselves veterinary nurses fraudulent or even worse, CRIMINAL is just plain ridiculous at best. The definition of a nurse according to dictionary.com:
    A person educated and trained to care for the sick or disabled.
    It says absolutely nothing to indicate the term is privvy to the care of humans. As RN2B2005 states, the modifier qualifies what type of nurse is being referenced.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    originally posted by skm-nursiepooh
    ?

    why are nurses so threatened with this??? can anyone justify this question without coming-off sounding superior to, dismissing of, looking down on, or disrespecting veterinary techs/nurses??? just a thought~

    cheers!
    moe
    i tried. i do not believe i have justified my opinions with any air of superiority, rather i have told the techs to be proud of their job, title and what they do. if i have come across as having a superior attitude to anyone on this thread, esp. the techs, i am sorry. like i said, i believe i did justify my point, several times in my posts, so it' moot to re-state what is already said. my feelings are unchanged, but i do have a much clearer picture of what techs do and their struggles. we all have them, i guess. that much, i am glad for; i am always willing to listen to opposing views and learn from the others here. g'day you all.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by fab4fan
    The post about RN's treating animals made me think of something that happened to me a few years ago.

    My cat got sick and needed to stay overnight at the animal hosp. for s.c. IV's. The next day, the vet offered me the option of taking him home and doing the last day of infusions myself because I was a nurse (not my idea...his).

    I figured, "Well, I guess it won't be that hard to manage." After all, he was still a little slow from being sick.

    Ha ha ha. Fifteen minutes later, blood dripping everywhere (mine, not his), I decided I would much rather put an IV in a 2y old than an elderly cat. He seemed to have 16 paws, five heads, and for a cat that had several teeth extracted, plenty of teeth left over.
    I called the vet and said, "If he can fight me that hard, then I think it probably won't kill him to skip the last day of infusions."

    The vet agreed, and eventually my cat and I were on speaking terms again.

    (Sorry about that messed up post!)
    TOO ******* FUNNY! THanks for that shot of humor..I love it!
  6. by   Q.
    sbic56-

    Nursing and nursing education, and who we are, what we do and what it is we provide is defined by nurses in the nursing literature, and other healthcare literature from our counterparts. Who we are as a profession and how we guide our practice does NOT come from the dictionary (I am not trying to be snide, here, honest!). Who we are comes from years of research and publications from nurses and our counterparts; and in that literature, nursing is defined by the human element, and not that of animals.

    Who we are is best defined by us, who fully know and understand who and what we are. If we left our entire persona as a profession to be defined by John Q (read: the dictionary), well, I'd be afraid. John Q thinks we simply follow doctor's orders!

    The dictionary is a broad definition of terms at that, meant to provide a basic understanding of a word. By no means is in intended to define or regulate our profession.
    Last edit by Susy K on Jan 4, '03
  7. by   sbic56
    Not taken as snide at alll, Suzy...I merely think we are making a huge issue out of what is a non issue, to me at least. I don't feel it takes anything away from me as a people nurse if those who are trained to do the same for animals wish to be identified as nurses as well. The vet techs are every bit as qualified in their field of expertise as we are in ours and deserve the nurse label if they desire it. I do see where they may feel that the term tech implies something lesser than what they are. It is similar, to me, to how those with a PhD in philosophy are referred to as a doctor. They have the years education, thus have earned the title.
  8. by   ShandyLynnRN
    I don't see the big deal either. I am under the impression that the definition of "nurse" for me, and a RN, or for LPN/LVN's, is defined in our Nurse Practice acts, scope of practice etc.... and we are simply adding our own "modifiers" in front of the WORD nurse, Registered, Liscensed, whatever. I personally would have no problem with Vet Techs being called Vet nurses. I can completely understand where the point is coming from though, of those who disagree. IMHO though, I just think it is being blown WAY out of proportion.
  9. by   yogastudentRN
    My DH is so amused with all the initials behind nurses's names that he frequently refers to our cat as:

    Squeaky R. Nurse
    Pet Therapy Services
    certified CAT-RN


    WHen an outsider picks up on all this nonsense of everyone calling themselves a nurse, you know its pretty bad!
  10. by   Q.
    The best way I can describe this is how SmilingBluEyes stated in another thread - and I am paraphrasing here - but she said that allowing others who are NOT nurses to take on our title is harmful to us in an insidious and quiet way, but harmful nonetheless. And I couldn't agree more.
  11. by   fab4fan
    Wow...I am glad that "wet nurses" don't exist anymore. Can you imagine how confusing THAT could get???
  12. by   sbic56
    LOL, f4f...could go in many directions with that one! Good point, though. Could be I am not so posessive of the word cuz it really doesn't accurately describe what we do in the first place. It's just a label and not a very apt one at that!
  13. by   vettech
    Originally posted by bmwcvt
    what do you guys think of the growing controversy of vet techs calling themselves nurses?
    As a Registered Veterinary Technician, I have always preferred the term "nurse" to "technician". It is a more accurate description of my job.

    I draw blood, I take blood pressures, I give shots, I place catheters, I monitor anesthesia, I shoot rads... in other words, nursing duties.

    There is a movement here in TX to change our title from RVT to RVN and there was some resistance from the RNs here. However, I believe it has been resolved and I expect us to officially change the name soon.

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