Unhygienic practices? - page 3

by worriedabouthygiene

4,399 Views | 27 Comments

Is filling syringes at a receptionist’s desk unhygienic? I went to a doctor’s office today for a job interview and they gave me some “on the spot training” which was basically sit at the phone and answer it, and fill syringes... Read More


  1. 0
    Run...
    So far as the syringes? I'm not so concerned. As long as it is a clean environment and the syringes are labled. I prefilled syringes at a flu clinic, we were only allowed to prefill ten at a time though.
  2. 5
    Quote from cayenne06
    Oh man, stories like this remind me of my first MA job. I worked in a clinic that gave conscious sedation for outpatient surgery. The MA responsible for meds would dump the liquid versed and whatever narcotic we were using (can't remember) into a tub, mix it up, and draw up a week's worth at a time. No individual labels on the syringes, just kept them in a big bag. Good times.
    And THAT, my friends, is why MAs are NOT nurses, and don't have NEARLY the training that RNs have, even though many of them would like to think they do.
    opossum, BuckyBadgerRN, coast2coast, and 2 others like this.
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    That reminds me of a vet that I once worked for who would have her assistants (high school students trained on the job that did a little of everything) stay late at least once per month to count all her meds and measure all the injectables because inventory in the computer was always off. Well that was because people would always use things, the vet being the biggest culprit, and not charge for them. Funny how I could never get anyone to understand this concept :/

    Anyhow, I came in one night to help them and I noticed that the person who measured the injectables, as she had been instructed by the vet, would take a big 60cc syringe, pull the med out of the bottle, write down the amount and then do the same thing with the next bottle....using the same syringe!!!!! So dexamethasone was getting a little bit of valium, atropine was getting a little bit of epinephrine and something was getting a little bit of euthanasia solution!!! When I stopped the girl and tried to expain it to her she looked at me like I was crazy :/ This had been going on for months, so all the bottles were contaminated, but was the vet going to pony up the dough to have them all replaced? Naaaaa.

    Needless to say that was not the only issue I had with this place and I did not stick around long, I'd rather be broke and unemployed because it's not worth it to participate in such unethical behavior. Racial comments, all previous vet techs had left before the one year mark, several pets dying within the clinic for preventable reasons, using expired vaccinations, a different employee fired atleast once a month, dogs getting lose and running out the door and down the four lane road and the list goes on, what a nightmare, gives me chills just remembering it.
    Last edit by Pets to People on Feb 16, '13
    opossum and GrnTea like this.
  4. 0
    I did a clinical rotation at a same day facility, at the end of the day, the nurses would pre-fill lidocain for wheels they would use for IV starts. I see no problem with that, but these were RNs not MAs and it wasn't at the front desk.
  5. 1
    Quote from 08RNGrad
    I did a clinical rotation at a same day facility, at the end of the day, the nurses would pre-fill lidocain for wheels they would use for IV starts. I see no problem with that, but these were RNs not MAs and it wasn't at the front desk.

    It's "wheals," even though they are generally round-ish, and it's not acceptable to have meds drawn up out of a multi-use vial and sitting around overnight before use. You might want to reconsider what you have a problem with.
    mariebailey likes this.
  6. 2
    Quote from GrnTea

    It's "wheals," even though they are generally round-ish, and it's not acceptable to have meds drawn up out of a multi-use vial and sitting around overnight before use. You might want to reconsider what you have a problem with.
    Agree, agree, agree! This gives so much opportunity for contamination due to microbial growth in the syringe. A couple of other thoughts:
    -The CDC recommends that you discard vaccines drawn up and not used in the same clinic day (some have shorter lifespans) even if the stability of the vaccine is proven to persist beyond that time frame.
    -Drawing up medicine far in advance can cause some medicine to adhere to the plastic in the syringe.
    -Interaction with the plastic in the syringe over a long period of time can affect the potency of the medication.
    opossum and GrnTea like this.
  7. 0
    doesn't seem too bad
  8. 1
    You intuituion spoke to you and you listened to it. You can't go wrong if you follow your gut feelings.
    I would not like to go to a doctor's office and see the MAs or secretaries drawing up syringes between phone calls-something hinky about that.
    GrnTea likes this.


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