Transition from STNA to RN

  1. 0 I have searched all through Google for information regarding this topic without any luck, so hopefully this will shed some light on my questions and concerns!

    If I have my RN licensure, can I work as an STNA in a long term care facility? Am I entitled to RN wages, or can I be required to work with STNA wages until a position opens up for me? Please let me know where you found this information, as my attempts to find it have been unsuccessful so far.
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  3. Visit  kdavis,RN} profile page

    About kdavis,RN

    Joined Jan '11; Posts: 5; Likes: 2.

    4 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  roser13} profile page
    0
    What is STNA?

    Whatever it is, if you accept a STNA position, you will be paid according to the STNA scale, rather than the RN scale.

    You can only expect to be paid RN wages if you are working as an RN. In some states it is illegal to work beneath your license but I don't know if that applies to you since I don't know what STNA means.
  5. Visit  NoviceRN10} profile page
    0
    I continued to work as a nurse tech (student nurse) for a couple months after I passed the NCLEX. I did not represent myself as an RN to my pts, I was still paid the tech wage. I did that just until I found a position as an actual RN. My unit did not have a spot for another RN at the time, which is why I had to look elsewhere. I guess different facilities/hospitals probably have different rules, though.
  6. Visit  kdavis,RN} profile page
    0
    Quote from roser13
    What is STNA?

    Whatever it is, if you accept a STNA position, you will be paid according to the STNA scale, rather than the RN scale.

    You can only expect to be paid RN wages if you are working as an RN. In some states it is illegal to work beneath your license but I don't know if that applies to you since I don't know what STNA means.
    @roser13: An STNA is a state-tested nursing assistant, which is a requirement to work in any long-term care facility in Ohio. It is not illegal here to work as an STNA with RN licensure. However, I have heard several instances where working beneath a license was allowed only if licensure wages were received. After all, even though I'm performing STNA duties, I am still an RN. I guess my main concern is, what if a situation arises in which I am the one medically qualified and licensed to handle the situation? Would I have to remain "in my scope of practice" as an STNA because that is what I'm getting paid to do, or as an RN as I am licensed?

    @NoviceRN10: I understand your situation, especially not presenting yourself as an RN while you were still working as a tech. It's unfortunate that they didn't have a spot available for you after you received your license. This company I am working for did hire me a month prior for a part time RN position, beginning once I received my license number. However, now that I have it, I suddenly have to finish my scheduled days as an STNA (another 3 weeks full-time), even though the position is available and open for me. I feel almost overqualified for the position and the wages they are requiring me to accept after the promise of an immediate start day. Perhaps just a cost effective decision on their part?
  7. Visit  ObtundedRN} profile page
    0
    My state had put out a position statement regarding this. One could work below their license, however, you would have to function in the scope of what you were hired to do. So if you're an RN, hired to work as a CNA, then you could only function as a CNA. HOWEVER, you would be held to the highest qualification you have. If you came across something that as an RN you know is bad, but a CNA wouldn't, you would be required to report it to the RN. Even though you're working as a CNA, you are expected to still function with the knowledge of the RN but in the scope of a CNA.

    Because of how cloudy this can be, my state also strongly discourages working below your license, or to inactivate your license.


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