Tips for a telemetry nurse who wants to work ICU

  1. 0
    Hi all,

    I am a tele nurse who has 1.5 yrs of experience. I've always wanted to work ICU, but unfortunately due to the economy, I had to take the first job that came along, which is on a telemetry floor dealing with a wide range of patients-lots of cardiac/chest pain, active DTs, seizure, etc. Once I hit the one year mark, I started applying for ICU jobs, including in my own hospital system. I've had no luck so far- most want at least 1 year of ICU experience now. It's like my tele experience doesnt count. Other hospitals are on hiring freezes, or are only taking internal applicants for their ICU.

    I don't know how to make my resume stand out. I have ACLS (it's actually required for our floor). I am also a member of the AACN. I perform as charge and I precept. I do read a lot of critical care books and magazines, but I know that doesnt count. I just want whoever hires me to know that I am willing to put in the study time to be a good ICU nurse.

    I guess I really don't know what to "advertise" other than general nursing skills. It's not like i get to hang a ton of exciting drips or anything like the ICU does lol. Can anyone think of medsurg/tele skills that would be pertinent to list on an ICU resume?

    I really like the hospital I work at, so I dont want to leave unless it's for an ICU position. I'm at a small-ish hospital, so our floor is pretty much the progressive care floor even though it's not "labeled" as such. I think if I moved to a stepdown elsewhere there wouldnt be much of a difference than what I do now. I'm also worried that if I stay in medsurg/tele too long, no ICU will want me (seems to be the mentality of some ICU managers that new grads are better for ICU since they dont have bad habits yet?)

    Tips/thoughts are appreciated in which direction I should take this! Thanks!!
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  4. 0
    Think of the patients you have cared for. How many of them really needed to be in the unit? Use this to highlight the ICU skills you already possess
    Make sure your resume includes the care of ventilated patients, IV drips, EKG interpretation,etc.Anything you have real experience in of course.
    Think of yourself as an (almost) ICU nurse!
  5. 0
    Quote from rdh1
    hi all,

    i am a tele nurse who has 1.5 yrs of experience. i've always wanted to work icu, but unfortunately due to the economy, i had to take the first job that came along, which is on a telemetry floor dealing with a wide range of patients-lots of cardiac/chest pain, active dts, seizure, etc. once i hit the one year mark, i started applying for icu jobs, including in my own hospital system. i've had no luck so far- most want at least 1 year of icu experience now. it's like my tele experience doesnt count. other hospitals are on hiring freezes, or are only taking internal applicants for their icu.

    i don't know how to make my resume stand out. i have acls (it's actually required for our floor). i am also a member of the aacn. i perform as charge and i precept. i do read a lot of critical care books and magazines, but i know that doesnt count. i just want whoever hires me to know that i am willing to put in the study time to be a good icu nurse.

    i guess i really don't know what to "advertise" other than general nursing skills. it's not like i get to hang a ton of exciting drips or anything like the icu does lol. can anyone think of medsurg/tele skills that would be pertinent to list on an icu resume?

    i really like the hospital i work at, so i dont want to leave unless it's for an icu position. i'm at a small-ish hospital, so our floor is pretty much the progressive care floor even though it's not "labeled" as such. i think if i moved to a stepdown elsewhere there wouldnt be much of a difference than what i do now. i'm also worried that if i stay in medsurg/tele too long, no icu will want me (seems to be the mentality of some icu managers that new grads are better for icu since they dont have bad habits yet?)

    tips/thoughts are appreciated in which direction i should take this! thanks!!
    i don't know where you're located, but i'd love to have you come work in our icu. new grads are not better for icu since you have to teach them basic skills in addition to the advanced icu skills they'll need.

    your resume is probably fine for and icu job without searching for enhancements. but you can sell yourself as an experienced nurse who already knows how to interpret rhythms, slam in an iv, ng and a foley all at the same time while comforting a frightened patient and how to have all her ducks in a row before lifting the phone to page the md. believe me, that's an attractive package in the large, inner city teaching hospital where i work. just keep on applying for all of the icu jobs in the area.

    if you think you might like to work in a larger hospital, most large teaching hospitals are desperate for icu nurses -- and someone with your level of experience is a jewel to be coveted. good luck!


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