Tales From Behind The Mask - OR Nursing How-To - pg.2 | allnurses

Tales From Behind The Mask - OR Nursing How-To - page 2

An old OR nurse once told me that any good OR nurse always carries scissors in his/her pocket. While I make use of my scissors daily, there are other factors that are vital to being a great OR nurse.... Read More

  1. Visit  sironside profile page
    1
    Just got a positions in the OR and starting next January. Thanks for the informative post about what is going to be expected of me! I have been looking for information all over the place. I graduated May of '09 and was immediately placed in Med/Surg. Been doing it for 19 months now and I finally got my dream job of being in the OR. Many of my former managers are shocked since I don't have years of experience. But I truly believe that your attitude: enthusiasm and initiative, is what would land such a job and make you successful in it. I will be getting 16 weeks of orientation and am extremely excited! For those of you who don't think Med/Surg would be a good start, I urge you to rethink. Even though Med/Surg is a completely different type of nursing, it still teaches you a baseline of nursing and interpersonal skills that are invaluable in the OR and, really, any other specialty. For instance, I've mastered foley insertion, surgical wound dressing changes, assessing surgical wounds for infection sterile technique, and dealing with pt's anxiety issues prior to surgery the next day. I've already been exposed to staples, steri strips, JP drains, and penrose drains. When recieving report from PACU on a surgical pt coming up to the floor, I've learned about EBL (estimated blood loss), how much fluid into the pt, how much fluid out, if MAC, local or general anesthesia was used, changes in pt's vital signs, how the pt tolerated the surgery, any complications, any problems recovering in PACU, ect. The point being that I would have had no clue what any of that meant or what would be expected of me if it wasn't for my start in med/surg right out of nursing school. I'm so excited to build off of what I already know and be in a specialty that I am sure I want to be in. Good luck guys!
    danid86 likes this.
  2. Visit  compactsnake profile page
    0
    Hey

    Im fairly new to this site but I've been working as an OR nurse for nearly a year and a half now.
    I've found that I use little to no 'nursing' skills in the operating room. There are two roles that I perform 1) circulating (which is being a glorified gopher...there is a little bit of assessment, but mostly it's about managing the OR room in general rather than patient care -> mostly done by anesthesia 2) scrubbing (which involves knowing the instruments, sterile technique, and how to pass the instruments.

    To be quite honest surgery utilizes virtually none of the skills I learned in school (BSN). Anyways, hope this helps!

    -will
  3. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    1
    Quote from compactsnake
    Hey

    Im fairly new to this site but I've been working as an OR nurse for nearly a year and a half now.
    I've found that I use little to no 'nursing' skills in the operating room. There are two roles that I perform 1) circulating (which is being a glorified gopher...there is a little bit of assessment, but mostly it's about managing the OR room in general rather than patient care -> mostly done by anesthesia 2) scrubbing (which involves knowing the instruments, sterile technique, and how to pass the instruments.

    To be quite honest surgery utilizes virtually none of the skills I learned in school (BSN). Anyways, hope this helps!

    -will
    If you are using "little to no 'nursing' skills", then you aren't doing the best job you can be. A little bit of assessment? Your preop skin assessment can mean the difference between recognizing a pressure ulcer that a patient came into the hospital with vs. one that was caused by surgical positioning and affects reimbursement. Circulating is much much more than being a glorified gopher. As an OR nurse, I find that while my job is very different than floor nursing, I'm still using a lot of nursing skills. They're just different ones- nursing school in no way can touch on every nursing specialty.
    GadgetRN71 likes this.
  4. Visit  compactsnake profile page
    0
    Hey I certainly didn't mean to diminish the rn's role in the OR, I believe they are vital. But I would say most nurses would agree, 90% of the skills learned in a ban program don't apply to the OR. Are we responsible for assessing skin condition, yes. Do I occasionally put a foley in? Sure, but care plans, Ib starts, medication management etc. All done by anesthesia. It terms of being the best OR nurse I can be? Well seeing as I have received many requests by surgeons to e in their room, and ill be moving into a team leader position, I think I'm doing ok. Anyways, I apologize if I offended you.


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