Taking out the trash - page 3

Are any of you expected to take out the trash at work? I'm not talking about picking up after yourself in general, but taking the bag of trash to the soiled utility room. I got offended when a... Read More

  1. by   orrnlori
    Wow, in the OR between surgeries, I've been known to even mop the floor if housekeeping has several rooms come out at the same time. I gather trash, linens and even make up the OR table. I guess the difference is that I do it because I want to get the next patient in the room, if management EXPECTED me to do it I'd probably swell up very fast and throw on the brakes. When I was in the unit I took the trash out if it overflowed or smelled. I really didn't think much about it. I can see both sides however.
  2. by   Rozhinitsy
    Sorry!! But I would empty the rubbish bins if they were full, as health and safety comes into being here. The domestics are usually very good at doing this however at night they are not around so much so.........! I have no qualms about doing this.
  3. by   zambezi
    I empty the trash in my patients rooms...I clean the sink-tops and counters with alcohol wipes, if the floors have blood on them from a procedure, out comes a mop (or more alcohol wipes). For me, I work better in a clean environment, I don't like to see spots of whatever or overflowing trash cans or cluttery rooms if I am working in them. Seems to work for me...
  4. by   MisterDawg
    Well, I've already carried the trash out, so I'm outta here...hehehe. :chuckle
  5. by   heart queen
    I empty out the trash, only when I've put something soooo vile in it... even I can't stand it!!

    I can only say this because our environmental service is sooo superb that I've not come across a full can.

    Yep, that's me smiling... sorry guys!. But I certainly WOULD if needed, I just can't fill those can's faster than they empty 'em. :chuckle
  6. by   LesJenRN
    yes, we all take out the trash. it is always a good idea to have your room nice and neat for the next shift and they should do the same for you. of course the patients appreciate it also. sometimes it needs to be emptied multiple times .... housekeeping does it once but not at shift change...
  7. by   roxannekkb
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    A lot of times the trash is full of nasty stuff and housekeeping only comes in to clean during days. So I don't mind emptying it. But never have I ever complained that someone before me left the trash full. I let the nurses decide for themselves without building it into their job description.

    Interestingly enough on our unit, the CNAs presume it's part of their job to empty the trash qshift and leave the next shift an empty trash can.
    That's the problem right there. Hospitals function on a 24/7 schedule, but housekeeping only comes to clean on days? So naturally then, the nurse is supposed to pick up the slack.

    As I said in a previous post, there is nothing wrong with helping out on occasion, but not having housekeeping available basically means that these chores are being written into off shift nursing job descriptions. Instead of just emptying trash, pulling linens, cleaning up spills--nurses should be protesting. Demanding that the hospital hire on more housekeeping. Pull the trash and dump in the CEO's office.

    This is what I don't understand. There is supposed to be such a shortage, which should put nurses in the drivers seat. That should include demanding that one be allowed to nurse, and not pick up everyone else's job. But instead, I keep reading stuff about how hospitals are more and more, cutting back on help such as housekeeping, and expecting nurses to do it. This is an enormous setback for nursing. No one else picks up the slack. Does the resident empty the overflowing linen? I doubt it, so why should the nurse do it?

    Everyone has a job description. Why don't nurses? Why does it change at management's whim? Today you are nurse, janitor and secretary. Tomorrow you will also be phlebotomist.
  8. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from zambezi
    I empty the trash in my patients rooms...I clean the sink-tops and counters with alcohol wipes, if the floors have blood on them from a procedure, out comes a mop (or more alcohol wipes). For me, I work better in a clean environment, I don't like to see spots of whatever or overflowing trash cans or cluttery rooms if I am working in them. Seems to work for me...
    I feel that you are probably very thorough and efficient and I also feel that many of us should/could be more like this and should learn from your example
  9. by   MisterDawg
    Hey, uhhh, we do our own blood draws where I work...and ya know what? When I get through, I pick up all my trash and carry it out, too!! Ya know, I take great pride in knowing that I've done the best I can do each day and so what if I clean up a room or take out the trash...those are just rules I live by, for myself as well as in the way I take care of others. We're all people, professional or whatever, and to draw lines over something as trivial as carrying out the trash when it is full belittles us all. Patient care comes first but to me, that's a part of it...I love it when somebody tidy's up for me.
    Quote from roxannekkb
    That's the problem right there. Hospitals function on a 24/7 schedule, but housekeeping only comes to clean on days? So naturally then, the nurse is supposed to pick up the slack.

    As I said in a previous post, there is nothing wrong with helping out on occasion, but not having housekeeping available basically means that these chores are being written into off shift nursing job descriptions. Instead of just emptying trash, pulling linens, cleaning up spills--nurses should be protesting. Demanding that the hospital hire on more housekeeping. Pull the trash and dump in the CEO's office.

    This is what I don't understand. There is supposed to be such a shortage, which should put nurses in the drivers seat. That should include demanding that one be allowed to nurse, and not pick up everyone else's job. But instead, I keep reading stuff about how hospitals are more and more, cutting back on help such as housekeeping, and expecting nurses to do it. This is an enormous setback for nursing. No one else picks up the slack. Does the resident empty the overflowing linen? I doubt it, so why should the nurse do it?

    Everyone has a job description. Why don't nurses? Why does it change at management's whim? Today you are nurse, janitor and secretary. Tomorrow you will also be phlebotomist.
  10. by   MisterDawg
    just had to add this...it's my horoscope for today...lol:

    [font=verdana, geneva]arieshoroscope (by astrocenter.com)
    you take great pleasure in having a neat and organized house, dear aries. in your mind, cleanliness really is next to godliness. today, you may find yourself dismayed by how run-down you have allowed your home to become. it's time for some clearing out, scouring and scrubbing! do this yourself, rather than having hired help. you will be pleasantly surprised at how much it will help you to clear your head. -
    tomorrow - professional phone consultation - email an astrologer your question!

    (no wonder i feel the way i do about this subject...heehee... )
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from roxannekkb
    That's the problem right there. Hospitals function on a 24/7 schedule, but housekeeping only comes to clean on days? So naturally then, the nurse is supposed to pick up the slack.

    As I said in a previous post, there is nothing wrong with helping out on occasion, but not having housekeeping available basically means that these chores are being written into off shift nursing job descriptions. Instead of just emptying trash, pulling linens, cleaning up spills--nurses should be protesting. Demanding that the hospital hire on more housekeeping. Pull the trash and dump in the CEO's office.

    This is what I don't understand. There is supposed to be such a shortage, which should put nurses in the drivers seat. That should include demanding that one be allowed to nurse, and not pick up everyone else's job. But instead, I keep reading stuff about how hospitals are more and more, cutting back on help such as housekeeping, and expecting nurses to do it. This is an enormous setback for nursing. No one else picks up the slack. Does the resident empty the overflowing linen? I doubt it, so why should the nurse do it?

    Everyone has a job description. Why don't nurses? Why does it change at management's whim? Today you are nurse, janitor and secretary. Tomorrow you will also be phlebotomist.

    Hmm. The nursing description at our facility includes "maintaining cleanliness of pt. environment", and "stat phlebotomy". Guess our place has taken that step already. Maybe it's just from being a former housekeeper, and a current phlebotomist, but this doesn't bother me one bit that this will be in my job description.
  12. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Agnus
    Sorry where I have worked the CEO does do trash as, does the pharmasist, and department heads and unit secretaries, and resp therapist.

    Your slippery slope therory that if we do this then automatically other things follow does not hold water nor is it even logical.
    actually agnus, where you work(ed) is definitely the exception and not the rule. i also totally agree with roxanne, and the slippery slope theory is most applicable here. what i'm taking issue with is if housekeeping duties were in my job description; i would tell them all to pound sand. but if it's something i choose to do, then there's not an issue. at its' most basic elements it comes down to expectations vs. choice. and where do you work.......i want to work there too.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Wow, I guess I've always considered it part of team work. My CNA takes a patient to the shower, I make the bed for her. The dirty linen fills a laundry cart so I take that to the dirty utility room for housekeeping. Grab up the trash on my way out since it was filled with bandages from a dressing change I'd done. I just don't see how that is degrading. If I have time, I help. If I don't, I don't.

    It takes about 10 seconds to grab up a full trash bag, tie a knot in it and pull up a new one from the bottom of the trash can.

    I do phlebotomy in an emergent situation or when lab is backed up and I have time. I do the respiratory treatments. I get the mop out of the housekeeping closet to mop up if need be.

    It also drives me crazy when a nurse will answer a call light and then not help the patient . .instead running all over looking for the aid when the poor patient just needs to pee and pee now for God's sake. How hard is it to help someone up on a commode?

    I think we are splitting hairs here . . . . I'd much rather have a happy team of folks working together than not.

    Empty the trash!

    steph

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