Survey: Would you encourage your child to become a nurse? - page 2

Please feel free to post any comments that you have right here in this discussion thread by clicking the "Post Reply" button.... Read More

  1. by   Walter R. Hobbs
    Greetings,

    This is so much more than a yes or no question. Each individual will have to see if this job will fit into their life.

    I'm male and have been a Critical Care staff nurse for almost 20 years. Most of that time I have worked an evening shift form 4 to Midnight. I work with a great crew of people on my shift who generally really like what they do.

    The evening shift worked very well for me when my two older children were pre schoolers. My wife could work a day job and I could take care of my kids. It is very important to us that we take care of our own kids and not place them in day care.

    Five years ago our youngest one was born and again I am able to take care of him during the day. However now that my elder children , age 15 and 17, have many activities in the evening I find that I have to miss these times. I wish I could be in two places at once.

    I've also become tired of working every other weekend and many of the holidays. I don't want to leave the bedside but it looks like if I want a 9-5, 5 day per week job I may have to get into administration. (shudder!!)

    So from the family aspect, I cannot reccomend nursing.

    From the worthwhile and even the fun aspect, it's a great job.

    There's nothing like a full code at the change of shift! (you Critical Care nurses know what I mean)
  2. by   Li'l abner
    Both my wife and I have been nurses since 1977. When my 18 year old daughter stated she wanted to be a nurse, both my wife and I said " NO ". She stated " I can be one if I want ". ( She has a bit of an attitude). We told her she had to shadow a nurse for a 4 12 hr shift rotation before we would register her. She shadowed a nurse on a Med/Surg floor for only 6 hrs and came home and said " You guys have to work to hard for your money ". She shadowed a Dr in the EDR for a week and is now in UBC Medical School. What does that say about nursing?:
  3. by   tiger
    smart kid!!!!!
  4. by   nur20
    Originally posted by Li'l abner
    Both my wife and I have been nurses since 1977. When my 18 year old daughter stated she wanted to be a nurse, both my wife and I said " NO ". She stated " I can be one if I want ". ( She has a bit of an attitude). We told her she had to shadow a nurse for a 4 12 hr shift rotation before we would register her. She shadowed a nurse on a Med/Surg floor for only 6 hrs and came home and said " You guys have to work to hard for your money ". She shadowed a Dr in the EDR for a week and is now in UBC Medical School. What does that say about nursing?:
    My 2 daughters want nothing to do with nursing, however i would not discourage anyone from going into the profession.I would say that if they are going into it for the money or recognition "forget about it" If you are not self confident,a people person and get a good feeling through helping others, and if you don't know if nursing is for you, you'll find out soon enough. We had people that couldn't even make it through the course
  5. by   st4304
    My oldest daughter (I have three) has been taking health occupation classes all through high school and plans to take nursing in college. Her long term goals, though, are to be a NP or nurse anesthesist. I did not encourage her at all. She just sprung this on me her freshman year. I was very surprised, too, because she is the one who seemed most upset when I missed a holiday or school event because of my job.

    It makes me feel good to think she wants to be a nurse and decided this on her own without my encouragement or discouragement. She is so assertive I like to think that she and other young future nurses like her just may be the ones to effect the changes in nursing that we all dream about.

    Sherri
  6. by   night owl
    I wouldn't discourage it nor would I encourage it. My kids have seen me dead some days from a tough night at work. They know I've been in nursing 24 years now, have worked every shift possible, every holiday possible, missed out on alot of family gatherings, (my in-laws think I hate them) But my residents depend on me and need me, so on to work I go. Now the kids see me limping around alot-hips are going, always looking for my Motrin. It does take a toll on you after many years of running the halls and being on your feet. If my daughter wanted to go into nursing, I'd be shocked first of all because she already said she's not going to be a nurse. BUT and a big one at that, I'd support her anyway I could. Maybe get her to lean more towards the administration of nursing. My son, well, he's going to be a automotive engineer and there is nothing that's going to change his mind! If he's not greasy, He's not happy!
  7. by   Jenny P
    I've encouraged my kids to become nurses, but so far, they haven't chosen to listen or follow my advice (so what else is new?). Both kids are quite smart, ADHD (I sometimes think that this might help in nursing in the future! )and also have the potential to be terrific nurses- they are both caring and sensitive, and are also the ones who have taken care of friends in need. However, neither one of them has chosen this path.
  8. by   nsmith_rn
    Never
    I would encourage soemthing like computers or engineering
    not enough pay and respect.
    In fact I so much as would not even halep them attend college for nursing.
  9. by   SusieQ1243
    In August I completed an 8 wk refresher course to make my LPN license active after being out for 6 years. I had such high hopes about returning to nursing. Then, in my second week for my clinical rotation I worked with my instructor for 5 hours on a post-op unit, took an hour break, then went to class for 4 hours. On the 2 hour drive home I cried I was in such physical pain. My neck, back, knees, feet... you name it, it HURT. In five hours I sat down once for about 5 minutes. My instructor walked a mile-a-minute and I once joked to her and asked if we could stop for fluids. I had to steal away just to grab a sip of water! Mind you, I am no couch potato... I run a very busy and demanding assisted living facility and sometimes work 16+ hours there, plus singlehandedly raise two very active boys! I grudgingly finished the course knowing that there was no way I was going back into hospital nursing.
  10. by   rosy
    As much as I hate nursing for myself, I would encourage my daughters to become nurses if they showed an interest. The profession does have problems-true, but don't they all. I was told by many people as a child the 'it takes a special person to be a nurse' I believed this then and i still do, and if the two special people I've had the privledge of raising wanted to be nurses, I say we will be a better profession because of them and 'God bless us every one'
  11. by   newnurse72
    My mother is a nurse, and discouraged me for years from going into the proffession. After several false starts in college pursuing other degrees and a few dead end jobs later, I'm everything she wished I wouldn't be, an RN! Admittedly I'm very new to the field, but loved most of my clinicals, and am looking foward to a long career in nursing. I think it's just in some people's blood. My mother is beginning to realize this, and is now O.K. with it. And yes, I would encourage my children to be anything they wanted to be.
  12. by   deespoohbear
    If one of my sons wanted to enter nursing school, I would not try to prevent it. My boys know what kind of hours I put in and how tired I can be at the end of the day. But they also know that I get great satisfication from seeing patients get better. I love to see what medicine and nursing can do for people. Plus, there are so many avenues of nursing you can choose today. I agree with the poster who said that better things are coming for nurses due to the nursing shortage we are experiencing. Nurses are going to be in great demand, and we will have the bargaining power for once. We just need to stick with it a little longer. As the part for no respect, I really sense the opposite. Sure I get the "I could never be a nurse because of all the disgusting things you see, do" but I also the the opposite response. I have had more people tell me they admire me for being a nurse because they know they couldn't deal with what comes with nursing. My own husband has told me that and he operates a dairy farm in which he treats a lot of the cows himself!! There are pros and cons to every job. Some teachers now are afraid to go to school because the kids are toting guns and knives. I think policemen and firefighters are self explainatory. So, it just depends on how you look at the situation.
  13. by   waggy-2
    Hi everyone,

    I will encourage my children(4 of them)to be whatever they want to be. So far, none of them have expressed a desire to become a nurse. If one of them does, I will encourage them. I love what I do, and have always wanted to be a nurse. My thoughts are that you could made a great deal of money, but if you don't like what you do, then why bother? While I would like more money, who wouldn't, I lvoe what I do. And while some nights suck, this happens at every job. I rather be paid what I'm paid and enjoy what I'm doing, and that's what I try to instill in my children. Enjoy what you do cause you gotta do for a long time.

    Have a good one,
    Sue


close