Survey: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortag - page 17

This month's survey Question: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to... Read More

  1. by   tantalus
    Dan, maybe I can help from the experience I've had.

    1. It's usually Agencies that recruit overseas but the hospitals are jumping onboard and doing their own.
    2. Pay is generally close to the new grad level because experience is overseas and not in the US.
    3. If you are recruited by an agency/hospital then they usually ask and expect a 2 year commitment during which you cannot be employed elsewhere because that's part of the immigration approval.

    Hope this helps
  2. by   Rep
    Quote from DANRN2000
    I plead ignorance! So I have a few questions?

    1. Who does the recruiting? (?Goverment, Hosp, Agency, Headhunters, HMO's, other)
    2. Are they paid at present RN wages?
    3. Are they "servants" to someone or some orginization that has funded their travel? (many immigrants are required to "pay off" their relocation)
    Just wondering.

    Dan
    1. Usually it is the agencies who do the recruiting. They have staff, laywers to do that unlike hospitals who don't have. Job fairs conducted here are being represented by agencies. It is during the interviews where hospital representatives would be present. The hospitals would pay the agencies their services once the nurses are it the states working for them.


    Also common are staffing/travelling agencies that would hire nurses here.

    2. Wages would usually depend on what state is the assignment. Usually based on legal minimum wage or as a new grad.

    3. Nurses recruited here have to sign an employment contract for two or three years of employment with the hospitals/employers. Once a nurse is in the state and is not satisfied with the contract, she can buy the contract but its too expensive. Between $5000 to $10000.


    Agencies/hospitals will shoulder the exams, immigration fees, plane fare and two months apartment rental.
  3. by   AmethystVeralyn
    It's more important what types of people they are
    than where they came from.
    I have seen foriegn nurses who brought their poor
    English and bad etiquette into the patient care setting.
    I have seen them refuse to speak English and have also
    seen them talk down at their co workers and treat
    them like incompetant little children.
    I have also worked with and been taken care of by some wonderful foriegn caregivers.



    Quote from TiffyRN
    Once more we don't have a nursing shortage in the US, we have a shortage of WORKING nurses. Other countries are in no better shape with their nursing situations. I guess companies/hospitals will continue to do it though because they can, we have the financial muscle to attract the nurses.

    I welcome our foreign nurses, I love working with them, they bring different ideas and experiences that I enjoy. I don't think we should restrict them coming into our country like some, just don't support recruiting efforts.
  4. by   renerian
    This thread is long lived.

    renerian
  5. by   Rep
    Quote from renerian
    This thread is long lived.

    renerian
    Well, you can not put a good thread down!
  6. by   mrf_bucks
    It seems like the same questions come up no matter which side of the atlantic you live.
    We in the Uk have the same problems with the recruiting and retaining nurses within the hospital settings from UK nurses, like yourselves they are tired of the shortage of staff, poor working conditions, long hours and in some areas incompetent management' this results in the recruitment of oversea's nurses who can barely speak english when they arrive here.
    Could this just be a way or obtaining a form of cheap labour untill they obtain their registration in this country as they have to work as nursing auxillaries till they complete an adaptaion course for their registration . This can take upto and above 12 months to complete, during this time they are a cheap alternative.
    There appears to be more office staff than nursing staff in our hospitals these days.
  7. by   Rose56
    I think it is true that if we tap into the non working nurses that are out there, it would ease up the shortage a bit. In my circle of friends alone, there are 8 of us (all with BSN degrees) who are out of the workforce. Two of us substitute for the school nurses whenever they need us. If the schedules were more flexible then maybe some of us will consider going back.
  8. by   rwrn4015
    Quote from lizz
    I could be wrong, but I believe there are new English proficiency requirements to potentially remedy that problem?

    (P.S. Where's suzanne4? She would know. )
    As a new grad, the topic of foreign nurses has bothered me. Over 50 % of the nurses on my floor are from the Philippines. That does not bother me but what does is when the nurses, N/A and other staff start talking in another language. I have no clue what they are saying and for all I know they could be bad mouthing me. I feel like their language should be kept out of the american workplace.

    #2 the foreign nurses have received free housing and transportation for a few months. I did not see my hospital paying for my rent or any gas money.

    These problems leave room for animosity toward the Philippino nurses . Does anyone else agree?
  9. by   Rose56
    Quote from rwrn4015
    As a new grad, the topic of foreign nurses has bothered me. Over 50 % of the nurses on my floor are from the Philippines. That does not bother me but what does is when the nurses, N/A and other staff start talking in another language. I have no clue what they are saying and for all I know they could be bad mouthing me. I feel like their language should be kept out of the american workplace.

    #2 the foreign nurses have received free housing and transportation for a few months. I did not see my hospital paying for my rent or any gas money.

    These problems leave room for animosity toward the Philippino nurses . Does anyone else agree?
    When I first came to this country, I used to work with other Filipino nurses and I remember that we also used to talk in our "native" tongue. Rest assured, they are no bad mouthing you. It is just so much easier at that time to talk in our first language. True, our curriculum was in English, but we still used our national language in conversation. We tried to refrain from talking in Tagalog, 'cause one of our clinical instructors at the time (she was doing our orientation) would say, " English only, English only", but it is almost automatic to revert back to Tagalog. Now, it is the other way around for me. After 25 years, it is so much easier to speak in English now, since there's no one to talk Tagalog to. I feel bad that I was not more persistent in teaching my children my first language.
  10. by   Rep
    Quote from rwrn4015
    As a new grad, the topic of foreign nurses has bothered me. Over 50 % of the nurses on my floor are from the Philippines. That does not bother me but what does is when the nurses, N/A and other staff start talking in another language. I have no clue what they are saying and for all I know they could be bad mouthing me. I feel like their language should be kept out of the american workplace.

    #2 the foreign nurses have received free housing and transportation for a few months. I did not see my hospital paying for my rent or any gas money.

    These problems leave room for animosity toward the Philippino nurses . Does anyone else agree?
    Philippines is a country where there are 87 major and regional dialects. The only language where most of us can understand is Tagalog or Filipino which is our national language. That's why when Filipinos meet they usually speak in Tagalog even if these Filipnos are working abroad.

    I am sure they are not badmouthing you. But if you are part of the conversation then I think it is impolite to speak in a langauge where you can't understand.

    As for the free housing and transportation. Usually it is only for two months. Filipino nurses who were recruited in the Philippines have to sign 2 or 3 years contract that's why Filipino nurses can not leave and change employers unless the contracts were finished. That is why they were given free housing for a couple of months considering the length of stay in the hospitals.

    Another reason maybe that nurses brought to the US are not yet financially stable so giving a couple of months free housing would lessen the stress.

    I agree with you that these things if not explain properly would somehow lead to animosity toward the Filipino nurses for those who were uninformed.
    Last edit by Rep on Aug 13, '04
  11. by   nancynurse05
    Quote from Darlene K.
    I don't have a problem with foreign nurses coming here to work. But I do feel that the funding used to recruit them should be invested in american citizens that would like the opportunity to go to nursing school but can't afford to.
    I couldn't agree with you more. It is always great to have other view points, the $ being spent could be utilized for 2nd degree students getting financial aid for school. I am a 2nd degree student and finding financial aid is next to impossible since I have a degree.

    My sister-in-law is filipino and came to the US when she was a BSN/RN. She had a kidney transplant 12 years ago and has been out of nursing since then. We have spoken bout her nursing classes and they were extremely intense. She told me, she wasn't able to graduate until she had delivered 10 babies, including remote areas. She had the starched white uniform, the whole nine yards.
    Last edit by nancynurse05 on Aug 16, '04
  12. by   BaystateRN
    It amazes me to look at the posts from the foreign nurses. It makes me wonder, why they train for a job that pays poorly and for a job that has an overabundance of nurses in their country. It seems the only reason why they do it is to come to the US. Are any nurses in the US applying for jobs outside of this country. In Canada you are not allowed to have a job unless no one wants it, also the same way in Bermuda. Why the tude if we are not all pleased that this country is not taking care of those who are already here.
    You also take a job and put someone in it who is willing to do most anything and work for almost anything, it will bring the wages down.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from BaystateRN
    In Canada you are not allowed to have a job unless no one wants it, also the same way in Bermuda.
    Same way in the US. A foreigner can not take a job that Americans want. Usually it's things like hotel maids, picking vegetables, etc. that Americans don't want to and there is a need, so foriegn workers pick up the slack. Sad that there aren't enough Americans that can fill nursing positions positions (yeah I know there are waiting lists at school, and lots of RNs who left the field and there really isn't a true shortage, etc. but that's another issue).

    But the immigration laws are clear. For a foreigner to come to this country and take a job, the employer must prove it's a job no American wants.

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