Survey Says... - page 2

-HBS... Read More

  1. by   hbscott
    Originally posted by oramar
    Seems like most people I know did a lot less overtime recently.
    Now that is some good thinking! Anybody else care to add to the working hypothesis?

    Shall we call it the "Governing Dynamics of Nursing Salaries?"

    -HBS

  2. by   hbscott
    Originally posted by liz75
    >>>>crickets<<<<<



    ...tumbleweeds rolling by

    Alone in the wilderness are we?



    -HBS

  3. by   live4today
    Hmmm...I'm liking the starting pay for the engineers. Perhaps that should be my next career choice.

    Has anyone else noticed the jobs paying the least at the bottom of that survey are predominantly FEmale occupied jobs? Nursing, teaching, marketing, psychology, and liberal arts majors?

    The top of the survey are usually male occupied jobs? Smells like nothing much has changed for women in this country pay wise.
  4. by   barefootlady
    Most of these male dominated jobs have decent salaries to accomandate more than 40/hr work weeks. Also they have some nice perks, like affordable health care insurance, generous vacation time, and faster vesting in retirement plans. Stock options come to mind also.
    The last job I worked went something like this: no COL raise in over 3 years, yearly raise equal to about 80.00 month when w/e diff was added. Medical insurance, life insurance, out of pocket expense for Rx went up about 70.00 month. Raise =10.00 month.
  5. by   happystudent
    Maybe that decrease is including LPNs CNA's, med assist in the group of "nursing" salaries.....more unlic. workers filling in the gaps..

    What do you think?
  6. by   hbscott
    Originally posted by happystudent
    Maybe that decrease is including LPNs CNA's, med assist in the group of "nursing" salaries.....more unlic. workers filling in the gaps.. What do you think?
    True but to make the survey valid (to some degree) the survey criteria should be consistent over the years. Wouldn't that population have also been included in years past?

    Is it a simple "supply and demand" issue that dropped salary rates as noted in the survey. Is the survey data valid?

    As many of you know I merged my clinical and IT skills and am doing pretty good right now. But markets "change" and if I don't keep up then I too will suffer the consequences of that.

    We hear there is a nursing shortage (or a shortage of nurses willing to work in substandard conditions) but to look at some of the data we have in front of us, well it just raises more questions.

    -HBS


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