To recommend or not to recommend? - page 3

Recently was told in confidence by a co-worker that my NM refused to write a brand new (less than 2 months off orientation) ICU nurse in our unit a recommendation for a CRNA program and she was HOPPING MAD, making statements like... Read More

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    I would also add too that, this particular nurse we are discussing is 24. I don't know about the rest of you, but when I was 24, I had much worse issues going on with respects to my personality and approach to life than "entitlement". Much worse. Heck, work at the ICU? LMAO, I wasn't responsible enough to not bother drinking right up to a few hours before I had to work. Thank goodness I was a landscape laborer and not a nurse at the time. So, yes, her personality may be a bit much to swallow, but she is surviving in the ICU at age 24 (with much help from OP and other co-workers I admit). Point is, she is a heck of a lot further in life at 24 than I was at that age.

    Like I started saying in my orig. post, with strong leadership, she will get that ship headed in the right direction. Life will hand her all the "doses of reality" and "blows to the ego" she needs to realize something she is doing is not going to work. When it does, if she trusts the leaders on the unit instead of fearing/resenting them.............very positive changes can be initiated. Its kinda like waiting for an alcoholic to hit bottom and realize a change must be made IMO.
    SlightlyMental_RN likes this.

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    Letters of recommendation are earned, not just given.

    Obviously the NM does not feel this nurse has earned a letter of recommendation, and it sounds rightly so. It's only been 2 months. It does sound as if she's just scraping by and doing her time to get into CRNA school, from what can be seen in the original post.

    I don't see an issue with wanting in the ICU for the purpose of CRNA school. I mean, if you go there to learn. It just appears that this nurse feels she is entitled to a letter of recommendation simply because she works in the ICU.

    Heck, I'm a volunteer and I have to earn a letter of recommendation. I don't just get them. If I am rude to patients and visitors, you can bet that I'm not getting a letter.

    Just because you do the time doesn't mean anything.
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    Quote from 2ndwind
    I personally know of 3 who actually told me they have no interest in nursing and just want to get "the necessary evils" done so they can get to that money. I have told them that they have decided on a dangerous path IMHO. They freely admit to seekin NG ICU only for that reason and have no intention of giving ICU the attention it needs. This is scary.
    Yeah, it's worse in accelerated BSN programs. I graduated a year ago, and many of my peers had blatantly disrespectful and condescending views of towardes nursing and nurses. They saw nursing as an unfortunate means to the end to being a CRNA. Most of them graduated with honors and 2 of them are now SRNAs. I must add though that I don't think this a bad thing; I think they will make good CRNAs due to their intelligence and passion for the career. Many of us entered for nursing for practical reasons, and/or consider it a stepping stone.

    (And before anyone gets butthurt, let me add the generic disclaimer that I know most CRNA hopefuls are not like my former classmates)...
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    Quote from 2ndwind
    I personally know of 3 who actually told me they have no interest in nursing and just want to get "the necessary evils" done so they can get to that money. I have told them that they have decided on a dangerous path IMHO. They freely admit to seekin NG ICU only for that reason and have no intention of giving ICU the attention it needs. This is scary.

    Ok, so you know of 3. I was a critical care nurse for 10 years before I went to CRNA school. After I was accepted, my fellow co-workers treated me like crap. BTW, CRNA is a practice of nursing and not everyone who decides to go to CRNA school does it just for the money.
    NurseKitten likes this.
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    And what's wrong with doing anything for the money, anyway? Like we'd all go to work for free if we suddenly didn't get paid.
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    I am less willing to say that it is a socioeconomic thing--that those who grew up poor/working poor are more likely to have a strong work ethic. I've met many a person/patient/etc who is of a low socioeconomic status (very poor/poor/working poor/etc) who is very entitled and expects to be given everything, or to get stuff for nothing.

    i think it has more to do with how you were raised in teh sense of how your parents raised you, and not how much money your parents had
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    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    I am less willing to say that it is a socioeconomic thing--that those who grew up poor/working poor are more likely to have a strong work ethic. I've met many a person/patient/etc who is of a low socioeconomic status (very poor/poor/working poor/etc) who is very entitled and expects to be given everything, or to get stuff for nothing.

    i think it has more to do with how you were raised in teh sense of how your parents raised you, and not how much money your parents had
    I agree. I grew up middle class, but as the eldest of 6 with a stepmother suffering from RA and a dad going to school and work full time, I was expected to pull my weight and then some--I helped hold my family together. But, I know some people who grew up poor and yet still don't seem to want to work to pull themselves to a better place in life. They like their handouts. And, I know some people who grew up rich thanks to daddy, but are quite lazy and are floundering on their own.

    It seems to be a matter of what sort of expectations one has been taught to live up to...
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    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    I am less willing to say that it is a socioeconomic thing--that those who grew up poor/working poor are more likely to have a strong work ethic. I've met many a person/patient/etc who is of a low socioeconomic status (very poor/poor/working poor/etc) who is very entitled and expects to be given everything, or to get stuff for nothing.

    i think it has more to do with how you were raised in teh sense of how your parents raised you, and not how much money your parents had
    Well, I would say there's a difference between poor/lower class and working class. Some, not all, people who live in poverty do have an entitlement mentality when it comes to government assistance (I'm currently in social work), but I think that working class families, while possibly living close to poverty, tend to instill a work ethic in their children, whether it be by example or necessity. At least, this was what I experienced growing up in a working class community.

    But yes, I agree that upbringing plays a role, ie. a middle class kids may have parents who didn't hand him/her everything in life.
    Cherish likes this.
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    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    I am less willing to say that it is a socioeconomic thing--that those who grew up poor/working poor are more likely to have a strong work ethic. I've met many a person/patient/etc who is of a low socioeconomic status (very poor/poor/working poor/etc) who is very entitled and expects to be given everything, or to get stuff for nothing.

    i think it has more to do with how you were raised in teh sense of how your parents raised you, and not how much money your parents had
    I see where coming from.. but SES is going to influence parenting style/upbringing..


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