Permissive vs Mandatory Licensure

  1. Hi!

    Does anyone know what the difference is between Permissive and Mandatory Licensure? I'm currently a nursing student and this topic came up in my text book. Their definition makes no sense to me -

    Permissive licensure allows for those meeting certain standards voluntarily to be licensed, whereas mandatory licensure requires that all individuals who wish to practice in the field be licensed to practice

    Can anyone give me some real world examples of this? My 43 year-old brain just doesn't get it.

    Thanks!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Agnus
    Quote from NCINDASUN
    Hi!

    Does anyone know what the difference is between Permissive and Mandatory Licensure? I'm currently a nursing student and this topic came up in my text book. Their definition makes no sense to me -

    Permissive licensure allows for those meeting certain standards voluntarily to be licensed, whereas mandatory licensure requires that all individuals who wish to practice in the field be licensed to practice

    Can anyone give me some real world examples of this? My 43 year-old brain just doesn't get it.

    Thanks!
    IN the United States in the 21st century there is no such thing as Permissive Licensure. This is an irrevelant discussion to to nursing in the USA. I suspect your nursing instructors will also see it that way.

    If they do not I would certainly challange even discussing this topic as it adds nothing to your nursing education or paractice. Even as a theoretical or philosophical subject it in no way contributes knowlege or understanding of your paractice.

    You have much to much to learn that is relevalent and important to be spending time on this fantacy idea.
  4. by   NCINDASUN
    Quote from Agnus
    IN the United States in the 21st century there is no such thing as Permissive Licensure. This is an irrevelant discussion to to nursing in the USA. I suspect your nursing instructors will also see it that way.

    If they do not I would certainly challange even discussing this topic as it adds nothing to your nursing education or paractice. Even as a theoretical or philosophical subject it in no way contributes knowlege or understanding of your paractice.

    You have much to much to learn that is relevalent and important to be spending time on this fantacy idea.
    Thanks for replying. I agree it seems silly to learn things we don't need to know, but that seems to happen a lot! Maybe they're just trying to weed us out by frustrating us to the point that we quit
  5. by   ratchit
    Quote from NCINDASUN
    Hi!

    Does anyone know what the difference is between Permissive and Mandatory Licensure? I'm currently a nursing student and this topic came up in my text book. Their definition makes no sense to me -

    Permissive licensure allows for those meeting certain standards voluntarily to be licensed, whereas mandatory licensure requires that all individuals who wish to practice in the field be licensed to practice

    Can anyone give me some real world examples of this? My 43 year-old brain just doesn't get it.

    Thanks!
    I agree with the other poster- non-mandatory licensure is a fictional topic that is a waste of time for a nursing student. Unless you're supposed to turn the topic around and discuss what problems would come out of permissive licensure... No educational standards, an HR nightmare, differences in pay... Would licensed staff have to supervise unlicensed? If there is no state issued license, how would clinical issues be tracked, reported, and disciplined?

    The only example that is close to real world that I can come up with involves certifications, not licenses. An ICU RN can get CCRN certified- that is optional. It says that nurse is knowledgeable in the practice of critical care nursing. It means nothing to the patients or families who haven't heard of it. And it doesn't say anything negative about nurses who haven't taken a CCRN- it doesn't mean their practice isn't just as good, just that they haven't sat for the exam. It's nice, but it doesn't really change much.

    It has never come up in my real-world nursing- I wouldn't stress about it.
  6. by   realnursealso/LPN
    I have a real world example. My grandmother was a practical nurse, many years ago. Well back then if you had worked with a dr enough, he could sign a paper and tell the licensing board that you had enough experience to take your state licensing test without any formal schooling. Grandma never did take the test, but many drs, who's pts. she had cared for in their homes, did want her to. So this may be a stretch, but it sounds like permissive licensing to me. Grandma has been gone for many years now, but I still have the card she gave me the day I graduated from LPN school.
  7. by   mel1977
    I did a search on Permissive Licensure bc I have a list of vocab words for my PVC course and both mandatory and permissive were on it. I believe it has to do with the older days when there was no real licensure, that you could be a self proclaimed nurse. I think this just has to do with the history of nursing, just like learning about Ms. Nightingale and other women who were important to nurses today. I read that NY was the first state to issue a "mandatory licensure" in 1938. This is not something we are concerned with today, as there is no Permissive licensure anymore.
    So, that is my two cents, but I am glad you asked the question. I couldn't find the answer in my text!
    I am going to do some more digging, but that is all I can come up with now.
  8. by   Jolie
    Would this concept apply to the various categories of midwives? States have set educational and licensing requirements for certified nurse midwives (CNMs). In many states, they are the only category of midwives that are legally recognized and allowed to practice.

    However, the practice of "lay" midwifery is common, even though it is illegal in some states. There are recognized steps that a "lay" (non-nurse) midwife can take, such as an apprenticeship and certification exam to become a certified professional midwife (CPM).

    Would this be an example of permissive licensure?
  9. by   mel1977
    okay, so we went over this in class today and this was the example our instructor used. Surgical Technicians have to go through one year of school like we do (LPN). ONLY, they are not required to take a test. They can work as a surg tech w/o a certificate. That is permissive licensure. where as nurses, have to pass a state exam in order to work. Does that clear it up? The thing is, this does not apply to nurses at all, so you wonder why even bring it up-unless just to talk about the past, yet our new text book didn't even touch on the subject!
  10. by   wassabobbe
    Mandatory Licensure, is a regulation which makes it illegal for any Nurse without Licensure to practice nursing for pay.
    Permissive Licensure, is a regulation which makes it illegal for a Nurse using the title LPN or RN when actually is a GPN or GRN.(Graduate LPN, Graduate RN).

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