Oooohhhh, Now I feel cosmopoliten, do you ALL wear scrubs?

  1. Heya!!, wow, Im a british male student nurse, and firstly,

    hi!

    secondly do all nurse in the US, austraila, everywhere infact wear scrubs? I dont, I wish I did, "surgical blues" (scrubs) are so comfortable, just like pyjamas!

    Oh and what does LPN, RN stand for? (I gather, nursing positions)

    We have Registered Nurse (RN)thats a normal nurse nurse,
    Enrolled nurses (EN) Very rare now, kinda a NA/RN hybrid in the 70's and Health care Assisstants / Nursing Auxileries / Nursing assisstants (HCA/NA)

    Thanx!!
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  2. 96 Comments

  3. by   JohnnyGage
    First of all, Welcome!

    Second, most of us here in the US (can't speak for the Great White North ("Drink yer beer, eh!"/"Shut up, hoser!") or down under) wear scrubs. I personally enjoy my surgical blues. I know that home health nurses and (I think) most psych nurses wear nice street clothes. A lot of scrubs are decorated and fancy with cartoons, flowers, or what not. I'm not a huge fan of those -- I'd tell you why, but enough flaming has gone on over the months with debates about professionalism and scrubs that I refuse to go there. (Although I guess I just did. )

    RN: Registered Nurse -- may have either a 2 or 4-year degree, or a 3-year diploma.

    LPN/LVN: Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse -- has a 2-year technical degree. (I know, I'll probably get flamed for this too. :stone)

    NA: Nursing Assistant -- Minimal training (I think 40 hours is standard. Yes? No?) to assist nurses in their duties.

    Just out of curiosity, what do you wear as a uniform?
  4. by   BritishStudent
    Well, if your in grand new milleniem (excuse the spelling, its 1:30am, Im avioding writing my assignment and also dyslexic dont you know ) then britian is positively victorian.

    Female (95% of total) nurses wear a dress, under new legislation their supposed to have a tunic and trousers uniform (its gotta be awkard hiking up those skirts while your stradiling a patient, bending down or doing anything pratical infact) males wear trousers and tunic uniform except for ICU and theatre. (oh and mental health (psychy) wear plain clothes)

    Now this is intresting, an artical in the nursing times (british nursing mag) says theirs a statistical link between ER viewership and British casualty department (ER's) nurse wearing scrubs, cool huh?

    I get laughed at when I suggest that we should all move to a far more pratical scubs uniform, and away from dresses and tunics, they suck!!!

    when I qualify I must have a job where I wear scrubs!
  5. by   cindyln
    I wear the surgical scrubs except mine are ugly green and love not having to launder or worry about what I am going to wear to work
  6. by   researchrabbit
    My latest scrubs have flamingos on them!
  7. by   emily_mom
    I just ordered a kokopelli shirt....
  8. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by JohnnyGage
    NA: Nursing Assistant -- Minimal training (I think 40 hours is standard. Yes? No?) to assist nurses in their duties.
    No! In the US state of Oregon, you must have 75 hours classroom and 75 hours clinical. In addition to passing a 125 multiple choice test, you have to demonstrate 5 assigned skills on a real person that you don't know until you draw the cards.
  9. by   aus nurse
    Originally posted by BritishStudent
    Heya!!, wow, Im a british male student nurse, and firstly,
    hi!
    secondly do all nurse in the US, austraila, everywhere infact wear scrubs? I dont, I wish I did, "surgical blues" (scrubs) are so comfortable, just like pyjamas!
    Hi from the colonies:chuckle (Sorry my humour!) :imbar

    We don't commonly wear scrubs here either. The only place scrubs are worn are in theatre or in an infectious diseases unit.
    We all wear uniforms set by the employer/facility. Years ago it tended to be a dress for females and a top/pants for males.
    Nowadays the trend is toward "corporate". It usually tends to be on a navy theme. Where I work now it is navy bottoms which can be a skirt, shorts, long pants or culottes. Tops range from patterned to white. Mine are supplied by the hospital. Other places you get a uniform allowance. They are not that strict (in the public system anyway) As long as you look neat and follow the colour scheme it is usually OK.
  10. by   lisamct
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    No! In the US state of Oregon, you must have 75 hours classroom and 75 hours clinical. In addition to passing a 125 multiple choice test, you have to demonstrate 5 assigned skills on a real person that you don't know until you draw the cards.
    Im in the UK and here, certainly within my area our nursing assistants have no formal training at all. The majority of new staff we employ have no clinical experience and come from jobs in other areas. Not that some of these staff dont turn out to be excellent nursing assistants but Im sure that a lot of them wouldnt even apply for positions if it meant completing some sort of formal training.

    Lisa
  11. by   baseline
    In the States and this "technical nurse" (sorry ) wore scrubs when I worked in ED, CCU,ICU and cath lab. Street clothes in most of the manager positions, and currently a little of each.
  12. by   lynnintn
    Since I do case management and life care planning, my uniform is often pajamas and a robe...
    I work out of my home.
    Now when I have work-related appointments, I wear street clothes.

    When I worked ICU we wore scrubs, of course. I love scrubs; they are sooooo comfortable.
  13. by   BeachNurse
    Being a RN and a research coordinator, I don't wear scrubs everyday. I wear business casual most of the time. When do wear scrubs it's because I have a clinic day in the hospital (in Peds). I wear some type of colorful scrubs, either a popular cartoon character or animal print...puts the kids at ease..
  14. by   rncountry
    Am I getting this right? British female nurses are still required to wear dresses? Just changing that now? OH MY.
    Scrubs are ok, though not terribly warm when the Canadian winds are a blowing to Michigan. I also dislike that housekeeping, dietary etc... wear them. Older patients often don't know who the nurse is. I suppose that if a nurse has to wear a dress at least the patient knows who the nurse is. Though I believe that would be even colder than the thin scrubs that cover my legs as I run into the building in a 90 knot wind.
    Dresses with a tunic make me think too much of the original nursing uniforms based on the uniforms servants wore in Victorian times. UGH.

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