nursing education

  1. I have been reading about the contoversy over whether or not nurses who graduate with an associates degree are as competent as nurses who obtain their bachelor's degree. Does anyone have any comments on this?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Audreyfay
    I know this topic has been discussed at length in numerous other threads. In the end, I just have to say that it depends on the program(s) and the person themselves. Book smart doesn't necessarily mean the person is a great nurse.
  4. by   Dream2BeNicUNurse
    The job I want in the NICU won't hire you if you don't have a BSN then again it is one of the top hopsitals in the country. At first I only wanted my ASN but because of this & the need to one day further my education I will go for my BSN.
  5. by   VickyRN
    This is a shame. In our area of the country, the NICU is BEGGING our new (ADN) grads to come work for them... (but then, so is most every unit in ALL of the area hospitals :chuckle).
  6. by   altomga
    This debate has been going on and on....ADN vs BSN...all I can say is that I have seen some extremely smart, competent nurses with either degree and then I've seen some real "idiots" with both degree's. A BSN will get you further up the ladder, but it doesn't make you any smarter as a bedside nurse. That I believe comes with experience and time. How many of us have said; "I knew nothing about being a nurse until I started working as a nurse"?.. :uhoh21:
  7. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Audreyfay
    ... Book smart doesn't necessarily mean the person is a great nurse.
    This can allude to an ADN or a BS graduate. And therefore is a neutral statement to me.
  8. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from altomga
    ... A BSN will get you further up the ladder...
    Think this is generally true when compared to someone with solely an ADN.

    But an ADN coupled with another degree(s) can be even more powerful in my opinion.
  9. by   briga
    Larry -

    Sorry if I seem obtuse, but what exactly do you mean? I have a BS - computer science, and am currently applying to nursing programs. Are you saying that an ADN program, coupled with my current BS, may be more advantageous than a BSN? ALSO - is the BSN required to later apply to a CRNA program? Or, just to work in ICU, as I've heard??

    Thanks.
  10. by   Cherish
    You need a BSN to become a CRNA (some schools accept Bachelors in Biology if your an ADN-RN but MOST accept BSN), a Nurse Practioner, Nurse Educator, Case Manager (I may be mistaken). You also need one if your becoming a nurse (officer) in the military. You also may need a BSN for certain areas in a unit of your hospital (training programs are helpful also). Some management positions or assistant director or etc. type positions usually hire BSN's (not to say that an ADN is not qualified by all means).
    Last edit by Cherish on Apr 15, '04
  11. by   manna
    I think with higher education (ADN vs BSN) - its often more of a matter of opportunity rather than competence.
  12. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from briga
    Larry - ... Are you saying that an ADN program, coupled with my current BS, may be more advantageous than a BSN? ALSO - is the BSN required to later apply to a CRNA program? Or, just to work in ICU, as I've heard?...
    Briga -- Think the strength of our respective degrees is situational, and dependent on a host of factors. (Huge topic, but will keep it short.) For instance, in my opinion, your BS coupled with an ADN would be much more valuable to an employer than a BSN, if the position you sought involved informatics or a similar work environment (case management, etc.). More and more, I see nursing gravitate towards other disciplines -- other sciences, business, etc. All these different areas of expertise help to broaden and uplift the horizons of nursing... IMHO, expanding points-of-view create stronger nurses and enhance professionalism.

    Don't know the requirements for CRNA programs.

    I'm in the midst of switching to the ICU (at a tech level) where I hope to remain after graduation in a couple of years. And everyone I've discussed this with (experienced nurses) has indicated that my BS in engineering and masters in management will be a fantastic background for a spot there. So... a BSN isn't a mandatory criteria for the ICU.

    Generally, I'd advise someone who already has a BS to not get another one. Instead, go the ADN route, get a job, then let the facility pay for the MSN.

    Good luck!

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