Nursing and Religion - page 2

I was wondering does your religion (any) help you in your career as a nurse. I just lost my grandfather and I know that my faith (I'm a christian) helped TREMENDOUSLY in coping with my grandfathers... Read More

  1. by   Rootbear76
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    That quote about the question" being over one's head", directed at Sunnygirl, I believe, is VERY pompous and a huge reason I have walked away from conventional religion in my search for spirituality. It was VERY presumpuous and arrogant.

    I am out of here as this thread will be way too hot to handle soon enough. Wonder why we cannot entertain other ideas and points of view w/o resorting to insults? Are debating skills THAT weak in some people?
    I feel that her response was pompous and yours too. You can't blame that on religion. Like I said, I just asked a simple question. I was not implying aethists or agnostics don't care, I asked how do you religious, aethists, or agnostics handle death. Also, if you are looking to people as a basis for not looking at God you will always be disappointed. I'm sure there's an aethist or agnostic somewhere, that has done or said something you don't like.



    CAN WE PLEASE GET BACK TO THE QUESTION I ASKED, HOW DO YOU COPE WITH DEATH AND SICKNESS, AS A RELIGIOUS PERSON, AGNOSTIC, OR AETHIST .....sheeesh!
  2. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    ...And yes, implying that the topic of conversation was over Sunny's head was rude and insulting, not to mention entirely inaccurate.
    Well said.

    Perhaps your faith will help guide you in how to act more mature.
  3. by   CCL"Babe"
    Personally, I don't know how anyone in the human medical field can be an atheist or agnostic.......we are truly "fearfully and wonderfully made". I've learned such an appreciation of the way God wired our bodies together in the years I've been in nursing, and I think it's miraculous that more things DON'T go wrong with us. I'm not particularly churchgoing---as a lapsed Catholic, I consider myself more "spiritual" than conventionally religious---but whenever I witness a death or see a new life come into the world, I'm once again in awe of God and all His creations. I also have no problem praying with patients if that is what comforts them, or joining in ceremonies at the bedside when asked to by the patient, family or minister. It doesn't matter what my comfort level is; I'm there to help the patient and yes, to serve God as well.
    I could not say it better if I tried.

    As far as using faith to deal with grief, I've tried learn to give it up to God (or a higher power - what ever ) along time ago. Unfortunately this isn't always enough.

    I had to leave pre-hospital nursing because I just could not pull another dead 16 year old out of a car. I could not deal with the daily horrors in the ER either. I found myself too angry all the time. I found that I could not get far away enough, fast enough from the hospital. There were some other factors as well.

    So I guess in order to cope I had to step back, try something new.
  4. by   Rootbear76
    Sunnygirl, I will apologize if what I said offended you. I was just wondering how people from different or any or no religions handle death and sickness as nurses on a daily basis. That's all. I wasn't implying no one cared I never said that. I was just curious that's all.
    Last edit by Rootbear76 on Feb 16, '03
  5. by   CCL"Babe"
    And yes, implying that the topic of conversation was over Sunny's head was rude and insulting, not to mention entirely inaccurate.
    There were a few posts while I was composing my answer.
    I have to agree that we need more tolerance. A good honest debate is a wonderful thing, without insults. There is already way too much anger in this world.

    Perhaps your faith will help guide you in how to act more mature
  6. by   Rootbear76
    Originally posted by LasVegasRN
    Well said.

    Perhaps your faith will help guide you in how to act more mature.
    Yes my faith does help me to admit when I am wrong. Perhaps, it was just a misunderstanding on my part.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by Just_wondering
    I feel that her response was pompous and yours too. You can't blame that on religion. Like I said, I just asked a simple question. I was not implying aethists or agnostics don't care, I asked how do you religious, aethists, or agnostics handle death. Also, if you are looking to people as a basis for not looking at God you will always be disappointed. I'm sure there's an aethist or agnostic somewhere, that has done or said something you don't like.



    CAN WE PLEASE GET BACK TO THE QUESTION I ASKED, HOW DO YOU COPE WITH DEATH AND SICKNESS, AS A RELIGIOUS PERSON, AGNOSTIC, OR AETHIST .....sheeesh!

    SHAME ON ME, I cannot walk away on this note, so here goes:

    I believe told you how I cope and my skills guide me well..in fact, since walking away from "church" I have sought other spiritual thoughts/feelings which has helped me cope with suffering, death and loss MUCH better than what I was taught in church. MUCH better. I feel much more at peace with my own pending death and the loss of others, even in cases where the death seems to make no sense such as in infant/fetal losses. I was not being pompous, you were. But that can be debated on and on......like I said, it's why I walked away from Church, but not from GOD. (you really assume a lot in your posts).

    Can you see the difference in RELIGION (for its own sake) and SPIRITUALITY? If so, then my post makes perfect sense to you and needs no further argument FROM you. I know of many atheists and agnostics (personally and have read works written by some)------ and many believe death is not an event really, but traversing to another plane, or phase of life, if you will. Life on Earth brief, soul everlasting in many forms. It brings many around the world GREAT peace to believe in this way, as it does me. I embrace these beliefs and they guide me VERY well in practice, but more importantly in life, where I explain death to my kids in this very same way.

    The Heaven/Hell concepts/beliefs imparted on my by my church and parents (as they presented them anyhow), did NOTHING to bring me comfort when thinking about and coping with death. I knew only fear ----til I sought other points of view/beliefs concerning dying and death. I don't believe ANY God wishes us to live in fear or w/o spirituality, but also dont' necessarily believe the way the CHURCH taught me either.

    Also one last appeal: Please don't attempt to tell others how to answer or what to believe......your "Non-faithful need not apply" attitude really turns many off (including me as you can see), and you need to be open to ALL kinds of ideas if youwant to have a really DECENT exchange here. Open your mind a little, you may just LEARN something even it is not what you want to hear. (gasp).....
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 16, '03
  8. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    ...Please don't attempt to tell others how to answer or what to believe......your "Non-faithful need not apply" attitude really turns many off (including me as you can see), and you need to be open to ALL kinds of ideas if youwant to have a really DECENT exchange here. Open your mind a little, you may just LEARN something even it is not what you want to hear. (gasp).....
    Well said.

    The way you worded your opening question could have very easily been interpreted as "How do you people who don't profess to believe in God cope with death and extreme sickness as a nurse because by golly MY FAITH helped me TREMENDOUSLY - I can't possibly understand how the lack of it could help you as a nurse".

    It just helps to remember that when you are discussing something as deeply personal as religion and spirituality on an open forum with all different types of members you must exercise diplomacy and tact.

    For some excellent discussions on this very subject that might also help in answering the question you posed, do a search on "Religion" and "Prayer". This topic has been discussed many many times.
  9. by   Rootbear76
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    That quote about the question" being over one's head", directed at Sunnygirl, I believe, is VERY pompous and a huge reason I have walked away from conventional religion in my search for spirituality. It was VERY presumpuous and arrogant.

    I am out of here as this thread will be way too hot to handle soon enough. Wonder why we cannot entertain other ideas and points of view w/o resorting to insults? Are debating skills THAT weak in some people?
    **************

    You say I assume alot in my posts, well you said that's why you walked away from conventional religion in search of spiritually, so I guess you ASSUME I'm into conventional religion, you are wrong.

    As I stated this was probably a big misunderstanding. I am a Christian, and yes I have used it to help me, and yes I was wondering how OTHER people involved in religion or not involved in religion handled death and sickness in this profession. I don't think I EVER implied anything about aethists or agnostics NOT BEING ABLE TO HANDLE DEATH. I ASKED ALL EQUALLY RELIGIOUS AND NON-RELIGIOUS HOW DO YOU HANDLE DEATH.
  10. by   Rootbear76
    Honestly, if I would've known that this thread was going to go this route I would've never posted. The reason I even asked this question was because I just got finished reading Echo Heron's book Intensive Care, and I just started her book Tending Lives. All I wanted to know was how religious or non religious people handled death and sickness everyday.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Ok---- if you ask, they will come. I did not assume you were "conventional", just stated I walked away from it. I believe innate in many religions is pomposity and the belief that all others are "wrong". That really turned me off to it all. I don't know anything except you are CHRISTIAN.......anyhow.... BELIEVE Me, alot of NON-Chistians deal with death a far sight better then many CHRISTIANS I know. (and vice versa can be true, also). I Spent 9 in years in the Bible Belt, so I know what I am saying (why, it was even in your home state Oklahoma was where I lived and trained in nursing).

    Good luck---hope you will be seeing some great and enlightening replies here, but if you bite their heads off the way you have thus far, don't expect too damn much, better to be diplomatic when and if you reply as Vegas suggested......
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 16, '03
  12. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    I know of many atheists and agnostics (personally and have read works written by some)------ and many believe death is not an event really, but traversing to another plane, or phase of life, if you will. Life on Earth brief, soul everlasting in many forms.
    Good point, Deb. Many religions try to make sense of, or take comfort in death by speculating that there is some form of afterlife, whether you call it Nirvana or Heaven or something else. For those of us who believe in reincarnation, it is probably just another way to believe that death is not the end of existence. And then there are some religions (I believe Judaism may be one of these, but somebody feel free to correct me if I'm wrong) where they don't believe in any kind of afterlife, and I can see where the comfort would be there also--you pays your money and you takes your ride, and you don't have to worry about heaven or hell, just the legacy that you leave among the living.

    just_wondering, it's great if your faith helped you through your grandfather's death; but faith and beliefs and comfort come in many different forms, and they are all equally valid. The key is to figure out, first, what belief system works for you, and second, what belief system works for your patient.
  13. by   Rootbear76
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    Good point, Deb. Many religions try to make sense of, or take comfort in death by speculating that there is some form of afterlife, whether you call it Nirvana or Heaven or something else. For those of us who believe in reincarnation, it is probably just another way to believe that death is not the end of existence. And then there are some religions (I believe Judaism may be one of these, but somebody feel free to correct me if I'm wrong) where they don't believe in any kind of afterlife, and I can see where the comfort would be there also--you pays your money and you takes your ride, and you don't have to worry about heaven or hell, just the legacy that you leave among the living.

    just_wondering, it's great if your faith helped you through your grandfather's death; but faith and beliefs and comfort come in many different forms, and they are all equally valid. The key is to figure out, first, what belief system works for you, and second, what belief system works for your patient.
    I agree!

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