Nurses in NYC - page 2

Hi! Just wanted to get some info of nurses working in the nyc area. Which hospitals are good to check out for RN positions, pay, benefits.. Any info would greatly help. Any negatives about... Read More

  1. by   canoehead
    Wow, having never been to NYC I always was told they were cranky sticks in the mud who would step over a man passed out on the street rather than get involved. Was always told that if you spoke to a NY'er at a bus stop they would ignore you or give you a dirty look. This thread is an eye opener for me.

    You guys need a pr campaign or something.
  2. by   semstr
    hey, i thought the New Yorkers were so talkative, because we were tourists. LOL and all seem to have familiy in either Holland or Germany and a lot of them even asked me if I maybe knew their uncle from Rotterdam, because Holland is so small. LOL

    And nooooooooo, we do not wear our wooden shoes at home and noooooooo I don't live in a windmill and yeeeeeeeessssssss I like cheese very much.

    I just love New York, even just for the word 'NJOY, when the waiter slams your plate in front of you!! (took a while to understand what he meant though)ROFLMAO

    Take care and 'njoy, Renee
  3. by   SpecFuz
    <<<Wow, having never been to NYC I always was told they were cranky sticks in the mud who would step over a man passed out on the street rather than get involved. Was always told that if you spoke to a NY'er at a bus stop they would ignore you or give you a dirty look. This thread is an eye opener for me.

    You guys need a pr campaign or something.>>>

    I was born in NY, lived here all my life and have lived in NYC and worked there for the last 6 years. I'm not saying NY'ers aren't 'friendly' as mentioned in this thread, but during my morning commute, at lunchtime etc., I would say the majority of people are not really all that talkative to one another. We usually want to get from point A to point B fast, and have never had someone look at me while passing on the street and just say Hello. Kinda rare unfortunately...
  4. by   -jt
    <We usually want to get from point A to point B fast, and have never had someone look at me while passing on the street and just say Hello.>

    You will most likely be acknowledged if the person is approaching you from the other direction and no one else is around - especially if its a hallway & they cant escape your presence. You'll at least get the head tilt if not the "howyadoin" that goes with it. I dont think people bother in a crowd where everybody can just disappear & we dont have to be polite. Cant expect it during the morning commute. Who the heck is awake?? And if it happens on a subway in the middle of the night, dont answer - just get to a car that has some people in it!
  5. by   Jenny P
    Hey, I appreciate the advice. I hope to visit NYC someday soon; my hubby and dtr. have both been there and loved it; I just have not had the opportunity yet. I shall remember the eye contact thing; and also the subway hint JT. I may have trouble with the accents, though.
  6. by   RNKitty
    Ah, Mario. I envy you! My hubby graduates in December and I pray every day (I really do!) that he gets a job in Portland. It is our ideal city. A great place to raise kids and close to the mountains, ocean, dunes. Plus, close enough to our families in WA to see them if we want, but not close enough for them to pop over without arranging it ahead of time.

    We took a trip to NYC last summer and I hated it! The conjestion, the closed in feeling, the lack of personal space and lawns/gardens (unless you count Central Park, but that isn't personal space), the rude people, the pollution. Good luck to you, but as for our family we will beg, borrow, and steal (almost) to get back to the PNW!
  7. by   mario_ragucci
    Portland will always be here, the ghost town it is. I say that because a majority of the folks here carry themselves like ghosts, and we ain't talking Casper the friendly one. I guess if you have a hubby or an old lady, it would be all right. It's a couples town, not one, IMHO, for single people to meet. It's really safe. The weather rarely freezes (rarely) and it's bicycle friendly. (for the most part)
    If I had an old lady, then I might look at things different. But unless you all ready have an established relationship, the chances of you meeting other people who want to start any relationship aren't very high. Plus, I've found folks do discriminate here (discriminate=treat differently), based on national origin. Maybe I'll met my old lady and presto/chango my personality into a person who fixates on one huamn aspect. Unlikely.

    BTW, one set of working hands can to more than one thousand praying hands.

    And I'm obviously saying "old lady" in a kidding way. I don't hear men refering to their wives as "wifey." If they use this context, they usually say old lady, which I find, well, okay, once your married:kiss :roll
    Last edit by mario_ragucci on Mar 4, '02
  8. by   RNKitty
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    It's a couples town, not one, IMHO, for single people to meet. It's really safe. The weather rarely freezes (rarely) and it's bicycle friendly. (for the most part)
    But unless you all ready have an established relationship, the chances of you meeting other people who want to start any relationship aren't very high.

    BTW, one set of working hands can to more than one thousand praying hands.

    It is a FAMILY town: OMSI, Zoo, Aquarium, great public transportation, bicycle friendly, environmentally conscious.

    I have no need to meet a man, just find a safe place to raise my kids.

    And yes, we have TWO sets of working hands trying to get us to Portland, but IMHO God controls my future more than I. I'll continue to pray.

    Funny, what you are looking for is exactly what NY will provide. My hubby and I decided it was definitely a single person's town with the night life and all. Not our ideal for our kids.
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    I am geting closer to an understanding of what people think god is. I respect you, and your beliefs, but not all people have the same brain, to feel what you feel.

    Anyway, Math is close to what I think people find in god. Let me explain how I see it.

    As I am growing up, and learning about numbers, I understand and have faith that a negative number can not have a square root. In other words, any number multiplied by itself will always give you a positive number (negative times negative is positive, and positive times positive is positive) But the prof said it's called an imaginary number. I just accepted it, and figured, at face value, no such thing as a negative square root, and imaginary numbers are beyond me. On Saturday, i learned about "i" and that it is -1. So, in my baby brain, I now see how an imaginary can render a negative square root. Some people know about "i" and some people accept that you can't have a root for a negative number, and leave it at that.

    The real crux comes in when we talk about division by zero. Not even the concept of "i" can divide nothing. zero is zero is zero.

    So, I respect people when they see "i", and pray for "i", but Mario thinks that division by zero has to be explained too. He keeps getting an error.

    Some insight into the mind of Mario, from NYC, hibernating in Portland.
  10. by   Netty
    To jt,
    1000 pardons!!!!!! "MY BAD" if I misunderstood! Did I just act like a NEWYAWKER? LOL
    Netty
  11. by   -jt
    <the lack of personal space and lawns/gardens (unless you count Central Park, but that isn't personal space)>

    awwwwwww... you never left Manhattan on your visit? Theres 4 other parts to this city. ; )
    My kids would just love if they didnt have a lawn and back yard of grass, trees & flowers. They could throw away the lawn mower & would extend the driveway & basketball hoop into a full size court! Manhattan may be in the same city but its a whole nother world. I couldnt live there either!
  12. by   RNKitty
    :imbar :imbar :imbar

    You are right. Never left Manhattan. I did see parts of Queens on the way to the Zoo, but probably not the best parts. Sorry to classify the whole city on a on week glimpse. I also appologize to all New Yorkers for being called rude. The ones I have met on this board are definitely NOT rude. Quite the contrary.

    Still, the PNW is home. I'm very homesick for the familiar and for family. Of course, now that all the good nurses will have taken spots in all the good hospitals I'm sure I'll only find openings at OHSU.:chuckle
    Last edit by RNKitty on Mar 5, '02
  13. by   shyviolet78
    Wow, I was always told that NY'ers were rude! As a matter of fact, a friend of mine that had visited NY on a couple of occasions told me that if I ever visit NY to be sure not to speak to anyone and not to make eye contact! Now ya'll are making me want to move there! Texas is a pretty friendly place. I live in the DFW metroplex, but I'd never move to Dallas because of the unfriendly reputation it has. Fort Worth is great though! Here we always chat with people while standing in lines or waiting for elevators, and say hi or at least nod when passing someone (except in a huge crowd of course-my neck would hurt from all that nodding!).

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