New Grad Stupids - page 3

Help! I am a new grad and my co-workers have forgotten what it's like. I'm not sure how this can ethically be done, but I need to hear the stupidest things you experience nurses have done, please.... Read More

  1. by   laurasc
    I had been working for only a short time if I remember correctly. I gave a laxative to a suspected bowel obstruction. Thank God the patient was fine. The head nurse nearly had my head on a platter...and I nearly died. Never made THAT mistake again!

    Laura

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    [This message has been edited by laurasc (edited October 17, 2000).]
  2. by   bluesgirl
    Originally posted by Mijourney:
    Hi bbqchick. Yes, I have experienced the trials and tribulations of a nurse from the crawling stage. I have also worked with new grads. The dumbest thing I feel is to not ask that question that may be knawing at you or ask for assistance. I don't care how well one did in nursing school, what nursing program one graduated from or how short, hot, bothered, and hurried the staff is, it's never dumb to ask a question and ask it again even if as a last resort you have to page the supervisor, the house physician, the ER physician, the on call physician, or former nursing instructors. Your license, the welfare of the patient and facility may depend on it.
    I also feel that it is vitally important to keep your knowledge and skills current. Being a new graduate does not mean your education ends. Even now, I always make sure that I have access to the resources I may need to look up something or ask something that would help me better serve my clients and myself. I still look up things familiar to me to make sure that there have not been revisions and updates. The complexity of health and medical care justifies that.
    Through your career, you will do things that you find afterwards you could have used another, maybe better, approach for. This is why continual learning and staying current is so important. And as JillR indicates, you will find that as you progress in your work, your experience will kick in. Best wishes.


    [This message has been edited by Mijourney (edited October 14, 2000).]
  3. by   bluesgirl
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Mijourney:
    [B]Hi bbqchick. Yes, I have experienced the trials and tribulations of a nurse from the crawling stage. I have also worked with new grads. The dumbest thing I feel is to not ask that question that may be knawing at you or ask for assistance. I don't care how well one did in nursing school, what nursing program one graduated from or how short, hot, bothered, and hurried the staff is, it's never dumb to ask a question and ask it again even if as a last resort you have to page the supervisor, the house physician, the ER physician, the on call physician, or former nursing instructors. Your license, the welfare of the patient and facility may depend on it.
    In response--mijourney,
    I've read several of your post---
    Your advice is always great--and very well put--understandable---concise--etc., etc.,
    When are you going to or are you already a teacher----please do
    Blues
  4. by   bluesgirl
    Originally posted by profjan:
    This is my 16th year as a labor nurse... BUT I can still remember my funniest experience as a student nurse in labor. I was told to " go shave all the hair you can see down below" on a patient having her third baby, I wanted to be a really good nurse, so I started to shave very slowly and carefully, well....the baby started to crown and I shaved the top of the baby's head before I realized what was about to happen! Lucky for me, the mom was amused by the "reverse mohawk" haircut I gave her baby.
    I have NEVER forgotten being a new nurse-hang in there-we all need all the nurses we can find!
    LMAOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL best one yet---tnks
  5. by   rosemarie
    I've been nursing quite a long time. Over 20 years and I still remember what it was like to be a new grad. You are trying to fit in, not make any "mistakes". Remember two things, one is there is no such thing as a stupid question, the only thing that is stupid is a question that's not asked. Also if a mistake is made, make it a learning experience. We all make mistakes, but if we learn from them, they become learning tools, and hopefully we won't make the same mistake again.
  6. by   Trina
    Hey bbqchick, I am finishing up my RN schooling this December!! I started in the spring so I had this summer in between my third and fourth semester- with that I decided to get my LPN and get some "nursing experience" before I graduate. I had been a unit secretary for the past 5 years on a labor and delivery unit so I thought I would seek out a job in Med-surg nursing. I now work on an orthopedic medsurg unit and it has been quite an eye-opener to say the least. I think you are probably just being a bit hard on yourself, but believe me I know how it feels to work with people who avoid the opportunity to assist the "newbies" out there. I hope you remember that in a year or two when someone else is new and will need your expert advise. I know I will. I have made a lot of near misses and a few small errors, but I will tell you the one thing that has really helped me through this is my humility.... I know I don't know it all so I asked a lot of questions and I look a lot of things up. And I try to be very calm and kind to everyone I come across no matter what they express towards me. It has worked wonders. Hang in there, and keep up with this bulletin board. this was the first time I saw it and you guys are hilarious!!!
  7. by   oramar
    Originally posted by bbqchick:
    Help! I am a new grad and my co-workers have forgotten what it's like. I'm not sure how this can ethically be done, but I need to hear the stupidest things you experience nurses have done, please.
    I am not a new grad, I am however new to LTC and making dumb newbee mistakes. This morning I poured buttermilk on all the patients cherrios. I am still laughing.
  8. by   dtweed
    Hi, I remember being new for the second time. I had taken ten years off to do home daycare will my daughter was in school. I was missing too much and couldn't find a day postion. Two months back, on a very hectic night, the cna said so and so had a temp of 103. Thinking it was the baby, but going into the right drawer for the right patient and right drug, walked in and gave a 9month old an adult tyenol supp. came out, realized what I had done and told my supervisor who was standing there. She told me to try to retrive it, which I did in liquid form all over my shoe. I also put tube feeding in the wrong side of the bag. but before it was empty. the patient became agitated and not knocked the pole over and we had tube feeding all over. I'm sure theilr are more, but remember you are human,you are learning and that you care. We need many more like you. I always say the day I quit learning is the day I quit. Good Luck
  9. by   longforseaair
    YEEEHAAAWW!
  10. by   Jenny P
    bbqchick, don't put up with that behavior from your co-workers. Sometimes a controlled anger is necessary to deal with people who don't understand that concept of being a team. Telling the others that you need help isn't a reflection on being a newbie- make it clear to them that your assignment is impossible for you to do. Stand in the middle of the nurses' station and announce loud and clear that you can't do it and you need help. Give an ultimatum if necessary-- tell them you will quit or go to another unit, or request more orientation, or compare your assignments to theirs with the head nurse; but whatever you do threaten, be sure and carry it out if they still won't help you. It sounds like abuse when others are sitting and your assignment is overwhelming.
  11. by   walkaway
    Originally posted by bbqchick:
    You are all wonderful to share like this.
    And it does my heart good, especially today, when my whole entire body hurts from the worst night shift I have worked yet. I worked so hard two nights ago that I still ache all over and my brain hurts. Somehow, I had an average of 7 patients and my coworkers had 5 each. And I often have 7 patients, but one was demented and combative and restraints didn't hold them, one needed a potent drip but was ordered IVP's q few minutes and the rest were post-ops or bleedouts. It was unbelievable and I got a little mad, but controlled it. And was exasperated. Asked my charge nurse for help and she acted like she was going to do something but never did, and I gave up on her. She basically told me to ask the doc on call if we could move one or two to ICU. I had already spoken to the doc on call, who didn't know any of the patients and was told to carry out the existing orders. It seemed that everyone's attitude was just live with it. My assistant was virtually nonexistant most of the night. One LPN sat in her corner and read magazines. One RN played on the computer and studied for a class. One RN was agency and kept taking breaks. I had liked it there so far, but...??? I hope I don't have a night like that again for a long time.
  12. by   walkaway
    dear bbqchick.. does a nurse since '68 still do dummies? sure hopefully no one noticed that I just posted a blank reply. I'm just learning this stuff. Just last week I had a pt who was on a trach and non-verbal. I was new to her and I talked to her with all the care I gave her. But I was not getting any kind of reaction from her just a stare and I wasn't sure how much she was understanding. I cared for her again the second day and of course things are always easier the second day-right? Well she had a peg tube with continuous feeding but per protocol I had to stop it for 2 hours pre and post med administration. Well about 1 hour after I stopped it I was checking on her and she was giving me this really strange look-it was actually the first facial expression I had seen in about 12 hours of caring for her. I could not figure it out but after 2 hours I went to administer her med and then turn her. Well there was 180 cc of tube feedng on her. I had disconnected the feeding but left the nozzle on her abdomen and failed to turn off the pump. After bathing her and changing the bed I looked at her and she was smiling so big that I think she was laughing at me. So you see it still happens. And yes I have never seen my hospital as busy and as short as the past 2 years. So hang in there, it will take you awhile just give yourself alot of positive self talk. But us old nurses need you young nurses. So I'm glad to have you in the profession!
  13. by   fergus51
    Man, am I glad I saw this topic! I am a student and feeling stupid is a daily thing. Most of my fellow students have done stupid things too, which gives me some comfort. One even discharged a patient without doctors orders. The nurses all had a good laugh and the head nurse told all the others to refer patients they wanted discharged to that student. He'll get it done. My latest goof was taking out a catheter without pinching it off properly. I am starting to wonder at what point washing urine off my clothes and shoes became normal to me. What will seem normal after years of nursing? I don't think I even want to know!

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