I'm Not Sure Nursing Is For Me

  1. I am currently in the process of completing my pre reqs so I can apply for the RN program at my school.

    However, after reading some of the things on this board, I am having doubts.

    Too many patients and not enough nurses; getting sick all the time; the first 2 years being horrible are some of the things I have heard.

    I just don't want to invest all this time and money into something that could be a mistake.

    I wanted to go into nursing after my third child needed to have open heart surgery at 4 days old. The Rn's in the NICU were so inspiring and kind. I wanted to be like that.

    I have four kids and get sick so easily so when i read that some nurses are sick all the time, it was a turn off for me.

    I love the idea of working 3 days a week only. The stability of the profession. Helping people in need.

    I know there are bad part of any job.

    I just want to make the right profession choice.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks

    Cheryl
    •  
  2. 28 Comments

  3. by   Sabby_NC
    Hi Cheryl

    Only you are going to be able to make that decision for yourself. If your heart and passion tells you nursing is for you then do it.
    No job is a bed of roses BUT what ever job you have it will be up to you to make the best of it.
    For me nursing has always been my passion, yes I have had 'those' days but few and far between.
    The smiles and tears on my patients faces melts my heart and reinforces my decision many years ago.
    Each to their own but you have to experience for yourself not go on what others have mentioned. Good and Bad in any situation of life eh?
  4. by   SuesquatchRN
    Well, I don't know what to say except that, could I do it over, I would not go into nursing.

    I had passion.
  5. by   HealthyRN
    As another poster stated, only you can know if it is the right decision for you. And you won't really know for sure until you are out in the real world practicing. Even then, it may take a few years (or several) to find your niche.

    Every job has problems and, in my opinion, nursing has more than its share. However, there are plenty of positive things about the profession. The job opportunities and variety are endless. You can work in numerous specialities within the hospital or in a variety of non-clinical jobs outside of acute care. The possibilities are so vast! After a few years of experience, you can work as little or as much as you want. You can choose to advance your education, which opens up even more opportunities.

    It can be very rewarding on many levels, although it can also be as frustrating as it is rewarding. As with any career, it is probably what you make of it. I do believe that there are some people that nursing is not a good fit for, but almost everyone can make it work somehow. However, be aware that the journey to finding your niche can be very difficult. I would not recommend that anyone embark on the journey without first feeling that they are truly committed to it and really desire to be a nurse. I would suggest that you shadow a few nurses in various settings to get an idea of what nursing is really like. You could also try volunteering at a local hospital to have the opportunity to observe nurses at work.

    Despite having a rough start, I am glad that I decided to become a nurse. I can't say that I love my present job, but it is a means to an end. I am optimistic about my future job opportunities and I believe that this is a very exciting time to be a nurse. Good luck in your decision.
  6. by   lizzyberry
    Just be sure that you really want to be a nurse before getting in nursing school because there is sooo much work involved with the nursing program. I couldnt imagine someone doing all the work while not really wanting to be a nurse.
  7. by   geekgolightly
    There are hospitals with decent staffing ratios. Mine is one of them. I have worked in hospitals with high ratios and it's very difficult being a good nurse under those conditions.

    I thought I was growing to hate nursing while spending a year in one of those hospitals, but I have since found a job with great staffing ratios and am fairly content. Especially now that I work the Weekend Work Option (work every Sat and Sun and get paid for working three shifts). I know my situation is good, and I can;t complain.
  8. by   mikethern
    NURSING ADVANTAGES:
    Great pay.
    Unbeatable job security: You can easily get a job at any hospital in the country.
    You can work any time of day.

    NURSING DISADVANTAGES:
    Physically unhealthy: High stress, exposure to hazardous materials.
    Back-breaking work.
    Disrespect from many physicians and coworkers.
    Dangerous: Possible to catch HIV, hepatitis, or other diseases. Many nurses damage their back.

    If I could live my life over, I would not become a nurse. The only I'm reason still a nurse is for the good pay. I really should find a new career.
  9. by   llg
    There's no doubt about it, nursing can be a tough profession -- but so are a lot of professions that involve taking a lot of responsibility for the well-being of others. Firefighters, policement, physicians, military personnel, etc. all have "tough jobs" in which they work hard and take risks.

    And yet ... society needs people to take such jobs to provide services that are needed deperately by people who can not always help themselves. For some people, the desire to serve outweights the difficulties and/or the benefits outweigh the costs. If you are not one of those people, then it is better that you discover that about yourself now and find a less demanding career. There are plenty to choose from.

    After 30 years as a nurse, I'm still not sure on some days. Some days are great and I take great pleasure in seeing people helped by my efforts. On other days, I just want out. Most of the time, it is somewhere in between. Tonight, I am going to accept an award for my service to the nursing community. I'll smile, say "Thank you" and try to use the ocassion to schmooze and use my honor to accomplish some political goals that might help me and my career in the year ahead. I'l just keep putting one foot in front of the other and try to keep moving forward, doing some good along the way. That's the real world for most people in any career.

    Good luck to you -- whatever you decide.
    Last edit by llg on Oct 20, '07
  10. by   SwayingPalms
    Quote from geekgolightly
    There are hospitals with decent staffing ratios. Mine is one of them. I have worked in hospitals with high ratios and it's very difficult being a good nurse under those conditions.
    I was wondering what you consider high patient ratios?

    I am in my first year of a two year nursing program. One of the nurses at the hospital where I'm doing my clinical rotation told me that they max out at five, which to me didn't seem too bad. She said usually they have four patients each. Is this considered decent staffing ratios? Just curious.
  11. by   EmmaG
    Quote from JLJ821
    I was wondering what you consider high patient ratios?

    I am in my first year of a two year nursing program. One of the nurses at the hospital where I'm doing my clinical rotation told me that they max out at five, which to me didn't seem too bad. She said usually they have four patients each. Is this considered decent staffing ratios? Just curious.
    That totally depends on the acuity of the patients. I hate staffing "by the numbers"...
  12. by   TrudyRN
    Totally your decision but could you spend time on the job with some nurses? Of course, you sort of already did, when your child was ill.

    Pros: decent pay (not great but decent); work any state in the
    Union, choice of specialties and of hours; reward of serving
    humanity; knowledge to take care of yourself and others;

    Cons: work holidays, weekends, all hours of the clock, much lower pay
    and status compared to MD, lawyer, CPA, other professionals;
    exposure to dangerous, deadly illnesses;

    I wish you well. I know it's not easy.
  13. by   Lizzy6
    [quote=mikethern;2456464]NURSING ADVANTAGES:
    Many nurses damage their back.

    Or get other permanent injuries from lifting, i.e. tendonitis both elbows.
  14. by   pagandeva2000
    The best thing to do is to speak to nurses themselves, preferably peers. I suggest your peers if you have any, because most of our friends share some core values; this is why we associate with each other.

    I do have a passion for nursing, but, I do not appreciate the backbiting behaviors that are so dominant in my profession. The difference, to me, between nursing and other jobs is that we are more dependent on each other, due to different levels of experience, education and talents, and we need all of this to save a life. I am a new nurse, but not new to nursing itself. I am trying to find the place where most of my talents can be displayed, in the safest environment possible. I know this will take time.

    Basically, most people here are frustrated because we do have a passion for nursing and wish to see positive patient outcomes. The problem is other nurses, physicians and unempathetic managers that throw crap in our paths and rain on our parades.

    Also, reading here helps, especially once you get into the foxholes with us. But, there are also positives. They may be far and few for most of us, but, they are the glue that get us to keep trying. Good luck!

close