I'm going through a transition...

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    After much thought and research...mostly from AN...I need a view from nurses who have transitioned from LPN-RN, as well as nurses who have transitioned from one specialty from another.

    I have accepted a head nurse/unit charge position at a Sub-Acute/LTC facility. I am very excited, as well as nervous, lol. I am excited because I am entering in my first leadership position; nervous because I have one year experience as an RN that has been rocky to say the least; yet, I wanted a great base in starting my career as a RN, like I experienced as a LPN-I started out in Sub-Acute and it opened doors for me; I also admit I have missed it-I have been caring for Pediatric clients most of my LPN career and the first year as a RN. The reason why I was hired was because if my background: I was a unit secretary, CNA, as well, and have been in healthcare for 13 years.

    I know they will have a well planned orientation, have a great system, and researched enough and have advocated enough during my interview to feel very comfortable in taking this position. I was able to shadow and get a "feel" of what aspects of my job I will do with the Nurse Educator and the DON. I will NOT be a Nurse Manager (I will make that clear, lol)

    My question is, HOW did you make the transition role wise into your job? What challenges did you overcome?

    I just want insight into the growing "pains" of transitioning roles...it has been a little painful as I expected, yet I am excited for this new endeavor, and want to hear other experiences. Thanks!
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  5. 0
    I have never been a charge nurse on a floor. I was a computer consultant prior to going to school as a nurse which I am just finishing up on now.

    In computers, people think it is about knowing all about technology. That is only partly true. It is about mostly ones people skills. That is the ability to motivate and organize a group of people in a positive manner, and the ability to put in correct process flows.

    When I was a techie, I would quickly learn the fundamental skillsI was going to use 80% of the time. This ended up being a very small skillset as I was focusing on everyday items used. Not all skills. I was looking to get proficient quickly and efficiently.

    People skills were senior to technical skills. It was important to know what information I needed to get my job done smoothly, and I needed to get these communication lines in smoothly. As most issues are not technical ones, but people communication issues.

    For items I did not know, I would ask the appropriate professional or look it up, but that support system and the ability to positively communicate with someone makes it much easier.
    Last edit by swansonplace on Jul 19, '13 : Reason: .
  6. 0
    Sounds as if your orientation will be tailored to address some of your concerns. Do ask your nurse educator and manager for input and suggestions about making this transition successfully. They have seen it before and should have some good ideas.

    You can also find a lot of continuing ed in nursing via your state nurses association, and dollars to doughnuts they have offerings on leadership, delegation, and such, aimed at new grads (which you are, having recently assumed the RN role). Call 'em up and ask for a mailer. I think they will help you enormously, either by giving you some new information and tricks of the trade, or by reassuring you that you know more than you think already.

    Good luck!
  7. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    Sounds as if your orientation will be tailored to address some of your concerns. Do ask your nurse educator and manager for input and suggestions about making this transition successfully. They have seen it before and should have some good ideas.

    You can also find a lot of continuing ed in nursing via your state nurses association, and dollars to doughnuts they have offerings on leadership, delegation, and such, aimed at new grads (which you are, having recently assumed the RN role). Call 'em up and ask for a mailer. I think they will help you enormously, either by giving you some new information and tricks of the trade, or by reassuring you that you know more than you think already.

    Good luck!
    Thanks Grn for your sage advice!
    I plan to look up my states Nurses Association to help add to my "toolbox" , as well as ve prepared to collaborate with administration and the educator.
  8. 0
    Quote from swansonplace
    I have never been a charge nurse on a floor. I was a computer consultant prior to going to school as a nurse which I am just finishing up on now.

    In computers, people think it is about knowing all about technology. That is only partly true. It is about mostly ones people skills. That is the ability to motivate and organize a group of people in a positive manner, and the ability to put in correct process flows.

    When I was a techie, I would quickly learn the fundamental skillsI was going to use 80% of the time. This ended up being a very small skillset as I was focusing on everyday items used. Not all skills. I was looking to get proficient quickly and efficiently.

    People skills were senior to technical skills. It was important to know what information I needed to get my job done smoothly, and I needed to get these communication lines in smoothly. As most issues are not technical ones, but people communication issues.

    For items I did not know, I would ask the appropriate professional or look it up, but that support system and the ability to positively communicate with someone makes it much easier.
    Thanks for sharing, and a great reminder for me swansonplace!


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