I love my job but....

  1. I love my job as a Registered Nurse in my field, my patients, and all my co-workers - except the CNA assigned to me. We all make a good team except for this one person who is literally a danger to our patients, is lazy, just there for the paycheck. To make a long story short, when I work with her I do both our jobs and emotionally, mentally, physically, after a year I couldn't handle it anymore. I spoke with my boss who agreed I could take a different shift that opened up. After a month I still didn't have my new shift. I asked why and was told no one wants to work the shift you're leaving, I didn't promise you you could move shifts, and you would be letting your teammates and patients down if you change shifts. I couldn't believe it so I handed in my second resignation letter. (OH! I felt SO foolish doing that!) My boss got mad, laid on the guilt trip about what it would do to the team and I backed off - again! I feel like a total jack&^%! When I give my word I mean it and I told my boss I feel stupid quitting twice and then she talks me out of it but I don't get what she promises me. Advice needed, please? I'm not good with all this promise stuff that never happens because I don't understand how people can (say the word - 'lie') do this to a good employee. I explained what was promised, she said it wasn't promised but a wish and she'd try but that I had it wrong. We shook hands on our new deal, my memory isn't that bad. I truly do not want to quit because I love my job but I also want to work with honesty, hard work, ethics, etc...I expect that what I give I will get in return. Can someone give me clarity here? Thank you!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   beekee
    Step 1: find a new job.
    Step 2: quit current job.
    Step 3: hold firm when your boss tries to get you to stay.

    The alternative is to learn to deal with this one person. That person isn’t going to change and your boss isn’t going to deal with it.
  4. by   Davey Do
    Edgar Cayce said something like, "You can't get someone into more trouble than they can get themselves into".

    I've dealt with a lot of Coworkers who were like you described, dogmom. For example one Tech was blatantly insubordinate. I informed him of this and said if he didn't do as I requested, I'd have to report him. He replied, "I don't care". So, I wrote a letter to the unit Supervisor, objectively documenting the facts. Well, the Tech was a drinking buddy of the Supervisor and nothing was done. Okay. I did what I could and let it pass.

    Sometime later, the Tech behaved inappropriately with a Patient in restraints, the Patient made a complaint, the behavior was reviewed on tape and the Tech was fired, proving Mr. Cayce's premise.

    Another time, in two separate situations, an agency Nurse blatantly neglected to provide care for two incontinent geriatric psych Patients. I attempted to deal with the agency Nurse directly to no avail. Again, I objectively documented the situation and sent emails to the unit Supervisor and Director. And, once again, nothing was done.

    After the agency Nurse's contract was up, she attempted to apply for a full time position at the medical center. I caught wind of her application and wrote "a letter of condemnation" and attached the email. The agency Nurse was not hired.

    Administration of the psych division have recently refused to respond to my communications regarding Patient and Staff safety concerns. So I began generating Event Reports in the ERS which are reviewed by the Chief Administrators, not just of the psych division.

    Although it is standard that reports filed into the ERS do not necessitate a response, I do see things happening.

    My advice to you, dogmom, is to objectively document these situations of concern, inform those in charge, and allow the fates to have their way.

    My very best to you.
  5. by   pixierose
    Quote from Davey Do
    Edgar Cayce said something like, "You can't get someone into more trouble than they can get themselves into".

    I've dealt with a lot of Coworkers who were like you described, dogmom. For example one Tech was blatantly insubordinate. I informed him of this and said if he didn't do as I requested, I'd have to report him. He replied, "I don't care". So, I wrote a letter to the unit Supervisor, objectively documenting the facts. Well, the Tech was a drinking buddy of the Supervisor and nothing was done. Okay. I did what I could and let it pass.

    Sometime later, the Tech behaved inappropriately with a Patient in restraints, the Patient made a complaint, the behavior was reviewed on tape and the Tech was fired, proving Mr. Cayce's premise.

    Another time, in two separate situations, an agency Nurse blatantly neglected to provide care for two incontinent geriatric psych Patients. I attempted to deal with the agency Nurse directly to no avail. Again, I objectively documented the situation and sent emails to the unit Supervisor and Director. And, once again, nothing was done.

    After the agency Nurse's contract was up, she attempted to apply for a full time position at the medical center. I caught wind of her application and wrote "a letter of condemnation" and attached the email. The agency Nurse was not hired.

    Administration of the psych division have recently refused to respond to my communications regarding Patient and Staff safety concerns. So I began generating Event Reports in the ERS which are reviewed by the Chief Administrators, not just of the psych division.

    Although it is standard that reports filed into the ERS do not necessitate a response, I do see things happening.

    My advice to you, dogmom, is to objectively document these situations of concern, inform those in charge, and allow the fates to have their way.

    My very best to you.
    Great post, Davey. Two thumbs up on the professionalism and method of reporting. Keeping this in mind ...
  6. by   anewsns
    Just leave, sounds abusive.

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