How Long Would You Wait for the Best Offer?

  1. So, right now I'm actively seeking to change my status from working two jobs to only working one job. It has gotten to the point where I cannot give my all to both jobs, so this change really needs to happen.

    Unfortunately, I'm struggling. My current nursing position (only one of my jobs is a nursing job) seems interested in giving me a full time position. While this would give me benefits, which I currently do not receive, the hourly pay rate would stay the same. When compared to other nurses, my hourly rate isn't the best compensation. As a nurse with a BSN, it is frustrating to see my classmates who only have ADNs making a significant amount more than I do in more prestigious positions. However, my rate does double on holidays.

    I have been applying to positions that have higher hourly wages. One was a public health nursing position, one was a med-surg job in a smaller community hospital, and numerous others were at a prestigious hospital. I was interviewed and rejected from the public health position; I interviewed with the med-surg position and have not heard back; and I was interviewed and rejected from one job at the major hospital and have been either been rejected or ignored by all other 20+ positions I've applied for.

    My question is, how much longer do I keep trying to pursue a better offer or position? I cannot keep working 29-30 days of the month anymore and it has shown.
    Last edit by Brian S. on Aug 3
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   Nurse Beth
    One piece of the puzzle here could be your interviewing skills, as you did land interviews, which says your resume was effective. It's so important to prepare behavioral and situational questions.

    Here's an excerpt from my book where 4 chapters are devoted to interview questions and answers alone:

    Prepare Three Examples
    Examples are stories with a purpose. Stories are remembered. Examples make you memorable.

    To prepare at least three examples, anticipate characteristics the employer will be looking for. Their questions will be designed to test for those characteristics. For example, you could reasonably expect that an RN employer may want to know about your:

    Personal ethics and insight: "Tell us about a time when you made a critical mistake at work."
    Customer service: "Give us an example of a time when you went above and beyond in customer service."
    Conflict Management: "Describe a conflict with a coworker, and how you resolved it."
    Flexibility: "Tell me about a time you had to adjust to a change at work"

    Now, think back. Recall a concrete example of going above and beyond in customer service. Think of a time when you made a serious mistake, disagreed with a supervisor, faced an ethical dilemma, and so on. As you think back, more examples will come to mind.

    Be sure to include an example where you benefited a former employer through your customer service skills, as patient satisfaction is high on the radar in hospitals right now.

    Your examples can come from school, work or life experience, because what they all have in common is you. You and your behavior. Behavior that illustrates the characteristics they are looking for in a candidate.

    Prepare at least three examples from your past.

    Your prepared examples may not exactly match the question, but that's OK. For example, if you are asked "Tell us about a time you observed a co worker doing something unethical, and what you did about it," you can say "I haven't really had that experience, but there was a time when I disagreed with a coworker..."

    To tell your example, follow this helpful formula:
    • Describe the situation
    • Identify the challenges you encountered
    • Explain the action steps you took
    • Share the outcome
    • Summarize what you learned and will apply moving forward

  4. by   saskrn
    You mentioned pay comparisons between BSN and ADN nurses as part of your concern. FWIW, I've been nursing for 20+ years, and from what I've seen the pay rate of BSN and ADN nurses is very close. Actually, many hospitals pay them the same rate.

    There are a lot of ADN nurses out there! I wonder what recent statistics say?

    My husband was just offered 3 different positions, and the pay was the same regardless of education.

    Just something to think about!

    Good luck! Do what makes you HAPPY!
  5. by   saskrn
    Quote from purplegal
    As a nurse with a BSN, it is frustrating to see my classmates who only have ADNs making a significant amount more than I do in more prestigious positions. However, my rate does double on holidays.
    Just a quick note about what I highlighted with bold. Do NOT let this attitude come out during an interview.

    It's just a thought.
  6. by   cleback
    Since you already work at the nursing home, I would take their offer of full time and continue looking for employment. Presumably, they would not need to train you any more, so to soon leave after accepting would not be unethical. You would also get a much needed rest... being rested may help you as you continue interviewing.

    Also, remember comparison is the thief of joy.
  7. by   purplegal
    Thank you. This is very helpful. If it was just one job rejection, it could maybe be attributed to luck in that there were multiple good candidates and one just happened to be a little better in one way or another. But when it's more than one rejection, there is probably some truth that my interviewing skills could use some work. There has to be a reason why more than one employer is not interested in me. At the same time, I've landed jobs before, so I know I can interview successfully, at least some times.

    Quote from Nurse Beth
    One piece of the puzzle here could be your interviewing skills, as you did land interviews, which says your resume was effective. It's so important to prepare behavioral and situational questions.

    Here's an excerpt from my book where 4 chapters are devoted to interview questions and answers alone:

    Prepare Three Examples
    Examples are stories with a purpose. Stories are remembered. Examples make you memorable.

    To prepare at least three examples, anticipate characteristics the employer will be looking for. Their questions will be designed to test for those characteristics. For example, you could reasonably expect that an RN employer may want to know about your:

    Personal ethics and insight: "Tell us about a time when you made a critical mistake at work."
    Customer service: "Give us an example of a time when you went above and beyond in customer service."
    Conflict Management: "Describe a conflict with a coworker, and how you resolved it."
    Flexibility: "Tell me about a time you had to adjust to a change at work"

    Now, think back. Recall a concrete example of going above and beyond in customer service. Think of a time when you made a serious mistake, disagreed with a supervisor, faced an ethical dilemma, and so on. As you think back, more examples will come to mind.

    Be sure to include an example where you benefited a former employer through your customer service skills, as patient satisfaction is high on the radar in hospitals right now.

    Your examples can come from school, work or life experience, because what they all have in common is you. You and your behavior. Behavior that illustrates the characteristics they are looking for in a candidate.

    Prepare at least three examples from your past.

    Your prepared examples may not exactly match the question, but that's OK. For example, if you are asked "Tell us about a time you observed a co worker doing something unethical, and what you did about it," you can say "I haven't really had that experience, but there was a time when I disagreed with a coworker..."

    To tell your example, follow this helpful formula:
    • Describe the situation
    • Identify the challenges you encountered
    • Explain the action steps you took
    • Share the outcome
    • Summarize what you learned and will apply moving forward
  8. by   purplegal
    Quote from saskrn
    Just a quick note about what I highlighted with bold. Do NOT let this attitude come out during an interview.

    It's just a thought.
    You're right. It will only put me in a less favorable light and says nothing about the people who have jobs that someone else has deemed they have earned. While having a BSN is a great accomplishment, I, for one, know that it doesn't make me a better nurse than those who only have ADNs. Focusing on what someone else has earned doesn't help me at all and could actually hurt me.
  9. by   purplegal
    Quote from cleback
    Since you already work at the nursing home, I would take their offer of full time and continue looking for employment. Presumably, they would not need to train you any more, so to soon leave after accepting would not be unethical. You would also get a much needed rest... being rested may help you as you continue interviewing.

    Also, remember comparison is the thief of joy.
    At this point, it may be my best option since they are the only ones offering me anything that would allow me to no longer work both jobs. In fact, several people there are actually encouraging me to take a more full time position there. Then, I would have days off so I could actually prepare for other interviews. Although, I guess since I already have a nursing position, it's not the end of the world if nothing else shows up.
  10. by   purplegal
    My boyfriend's response to my considering full time at my other job, "Oh Yuck!"
  11. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from purplegal
    So, right now I'm actively seeking to change my status from working two jobs to only working one job. It has gotten to the point where I cannot give my all to both jobs, so this change really needs to happen.

    Unfortunately, I'm struggling. My current nursing position (only one of my jobs is a nursing job) seems interested in giving me a full time position. While this would give me benefits, which I currently do not receive, the hourly pay rate would stay the same. When compared to other nurses, my hourly rate isn't the best compensation. As a nurse with a BSN, it is frustrating to see my classmates who only have ADNs making a significant amount more than I do in more prestigious positions. However, my rate does double on holidays.

    I have been applying to positions that have higher hourly wages. One was a public health nursing position, one was a med-surg job in a smaller community hospital, and numerous others were at a prestigious hospital. I was interviewed and rejected from the public health position; I interviewed with the med-surg position and have not heard back; and I was interviewed and rejected from one job at the major hospital and have been either been rejected or ignored by all other 20+ positions I've applied for.

    My question is, how much longer do I keep trying to pursue a better offer or position? I cannot keep working 29-30 days of the month anymore and it has shown.
    I don't understand how your classmates wound up with ADNs while you have a BSN. Be that as it may, this statement exhibits an ugly attitude that I would hope you are keeping under wraps during your interviews. ADNs and BSNs usually fall on the same salary scale, and deservedly so. They do the same work. BSNs have more opportunities, however.

    You keep pursuing a different position as long as it takes to get one. Sometimes it takes a long time to land a nursing job. I would wonder about your resume, cover letters and interviewing skills, however. There's a good article on the forum (and I've forgotten where I ran across it) about what to do when you aren't getting hired, promoted, etc. It talks about interviewing skills, resumes, etc.
  12. by   purplegal
    I originally graduated with an ADN, and then pursued my BSN. Some of my classmates from ADN program have yet to complete their BSN. While ADNs and BSNs due generally perform the same duties, it seems like someone should get recognition for having a BSN since it took additional schooling and training.
  13. by   chacha82
    Many places don't pay extra for the BSN. I'm an ADN, I make the same as my BSN colleagues who were hired at the same time as me. But I am working on my BSN.

    I'm really glad for you that you are making the switch to working 1 job. You will feel better! People deserve time off, and a job like nursing is very tiring. It's important to rest and recharge on your days off, so allow yourself to do that. You don't have to spend money to enjoy your free time. I learned this while getting out of debt. Go for walks, take an old book to a coffee shop, take a hot bath. Draw, listen to the radio, do nothing. Sit outside and watch the stars come out. Get a 99 cent donut, call someone in your family. Anything that makes you stretch out and say "ahhhh"

    I'd encourage you to take the full-time position and work that job for awhile. In time, you can decide if you want to apply other places. I'd give it a good 8 months full-time before you started applying elsewhere. If you want a hospital job, longer full-time employment will look desirable to them. Enjoy your days off!
  14. by   Cactus Nurse
    I say take the full time for now and keep looking. I have been very picky in where I work as a Nurse and I have yet to get a low paying job. Every new job I've had, I've gotten an increase. Don't be afraid to ask for more. I turned down a correctional nurse job with excellent benefits because they wanted to offer me starting lay with my year and a half experience. I asked if they hired new grads, when they said yes, I said then wtf would I get paid not even a penny more than them?? I was livid because I really wanted to work there.. I turned it down and the same day I found my current job that I absolutely love and get laid $2.50 more and am always doing overtime.

    Be pt. Take the full time and when u get s better job offer tell them why u are leaving, see if they will match it. If not p, say goodbye and start your new journey.

    The best part of nursing, it is t always bad to have a long work history

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