How do you deal with lazy co-workers? - page 3

I have been an RN for 4 years and have always considered myself to be a "team" player. One of my fellow RN's who I work with on a regular basis, just does not seem to be as helpful. The other night... Read More

  1. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    Thanks to all for their support!

    On evening shift at my place--there is NO charge nurse. Only the house nursing supervisor. Over this past weekend we again got bombarded with admissions and I AGAIN asked the sup for help but was declined. As I posted before--the powers that be are only concerned with the number of patients on the floor not the acuity of the patients. For example--this weekend I was assigned to care for a chronic trach/vent patient along with 4 other patients. Our policy states that the RN who is caring for such a pt is to have only 3 other pt's. Well since this pt is not really on a vent(he's on C-PAP mode but did I mention that he is also on ORSA precautions?) and "really isn't a lot of work" , they changed the ratio to 1:6 for the RN caring for this pt--this includes ALL THREE SHIFTS!!! And the other RN's are assigned a max of 6 pts. Plus this pt is a full code! They change the rules to accomodate staffing--which is really unsafe and I also was caring for a severly hypogylcemic pt as well! Oh I could go on.
    I am really at my wits end!


    I don't believe you are alone with working impossible shifts, especially after reading the thread "Obstacles to providing care." The list given by nurses are long and give an idea how difficult nursing can be today.
  2. by   OneChattyNurse
    Why is it that the lazy ones are the ones who claim to be the best workers. I have never worked with so many "active retired" staff memebers in my whole life. They however seem to be the ones that are always talking about how much work they do!!
  3. by   canoehead
    My pet peeve is nurses who do minimum for their patients, then sit at the station "charting" all day, putting their two cents worth in about everyone else's assignment.
    What a waste of good protoplasm.
  4. by   nurs4kids
    .
    Last edit by nurs4kids on Aug 21, '01
  5. by   nurs4kids
    LOL..I love the "cranio rectal inversion"!!

    I agree with canoehead. Ever notice these are the same nurses that patients just dearly adore? The same nurses that the nurse on the following shift receives a complaint from the patient because he/she "came in the room too often"? Ever notice they have more patients go into full blown codes (things that with good assessment may have been caught early)? We have two of them..they call themselves "good time managers". We call them "good bs'ers".

    I once hid a stethescope of one of them..very very early in the shift. He began looking for it after he clocked out 12hours later. Sad, eh?
  6. by   Nursz-R-Awsm
    nurs4kids
    Yes, that is very sad....

    .....but I like the way you think!
    Lisa
  7. by   longforseaair
    These are great to read! I just finished too many twelves in too few days. Got so tired at the end that I was working at half speed. I haven't been an RN for long and perpetually struggle with getting everything done and charting as well. And, every shift as I attempt to sit to chart, there goes another light, or a call from a doc, or family wants to talk, or call for a bed, and I can't note and talk to someone else at the same time. I never get to take a break, and rarely get my lunch. Sometimes, not eating for twelve hours. And I know, I know, I may be more efficient if I did those things, because it may reenergize me. But, I swear that as soon as I get those meds done, or procedures done, or critical orders noted, or that one more thing that is pressing, things snowball and I miss the opportunity. I cringe sometimes when I go in a patients room because I know that they will want twenty things done while I'm in there and I will get snowballing.
    I am often charge, even as a baby nurse, because we have many LPN's and no one wants the responsibility. At my unit, charge simply means that you assign beds, make sure supervisor staffs for the next shift and make pt. assignments at shift change, plus complete all the routine paperwork such as crash cart checks, etc, plus assume ultimate responsibility for all mistakes or go-wrongs. I have asked to not be charge so often, to deaf ears.
    Most of my co-workers are longtimers and independent of my decisions. We all just pretty much pick up the same groups we had the night before and admits come by turn regardless of acuity of busy groups. Sometimes you get all the bad and vice versa.
    We have slugs and self-promoters, and look-gooders and great-talkers and connivers who somehow secure the best aides for themselves always.
    We also have good nurses who offer to pitch in and restart IV's that go bad, or give pain meds while you're stuck in a room, etc. And I remember them fondly when they have a bad night.
    While I sincerely feel (ignorantly) that I treat all patients and co-workers equally, it sideswipes me when an aide complains that I don't help. It equally sidewipes me when I enter a pt. room first time that night and they exclaim, "Oh! "bbqchick", I am so glad you are back! You're the only nurse who seems to really care and are not here just for the job!" I know we have other caring nurses. I wonder if I am sacrificing my organizational goals for overdoing for pt's and letting aides walk on me? And, more freq I get my charting done by shift end now.
    But, it seems like more nights than others now, we have too high of acuity which doesn't matter when calls come for a bed. The other night, I was at the end of my coping ability, fully frustrated told the caller that I had to refuse the patient r/t understaffing. Supervisor called in microminute and loudly proclaimed that I could not refuse the patient and we were not understaffed. It's true that our nurse patient ratio agreed with the number shuffle but our 15 patients with three nurses (one new grad still on orientation) and one aide on a step-down unit felt like twice as many patients, the nurse aide started bawling at least once that night. One patient should have been in ICU- septic, cdiff, TPN, DM, decub and huge man, total care on a mask with prn suction.
    I don't see how nurses get everything done in time and can sit and gossip and read mags.
    I know I'm a dumb cluck and also can't stand to hear a light go off and let it ring. Oh well...I self-speak that the running is keeping my leg blood circulating and maybe burning calories? And I try to smile, smile, smile. What a sucker.
  8. by   longforseaair
    These are great to read! I just finished too many twelves in too few days. Got so tired at the end that I was working at half speed. I haven't been an RN for long and perpetually struggle with getting everything done and charting as well. And, every shift as I attempt to sit to chart, there goes another light, or a call from a doc, or family wants to talk, or call for a bed, and I can't note and talk to someone else at the same time. I never get to take a break, and rarely get my lunch. Sometimes, not eating for twelve hours. And I know, I know, I may be more efficient if I did those things, because it may reenergize me. But, I swear that as soon as I get those meds done, or procedures done, or critical orders noted, or that one more thing that is pressing, things snowball and I miss the opportunity. I cringe sometimes when I go in a patients room because I know that they will want twenty things done while I'm in there and I will get snowballing.
    I am often charge, even as a baby nurse, because we have many LPN's and no one wants the responsibility. At my unit, charge simply means that you assign beds, make sure supervisor staffs for the next shift and make pt. assignments at shift change, plus complete all the routine paperwork such as crash cart checks, etc, plus assume ultimate responsibility for all mistakes or go-wrongs. I have asked to not be charge so often, to deaf ears.
    Most of my co-workers are longtimers and independent of my decisions. We all just pretty much pick up the same groups we had the night before and admits come by turn regardless of acuity of busy groups. Sometimes you get all the bad and vice versa.
    We have slugs and self-promoters, and look-gooders and great-talkers and connivers who somehow secure the best aides for themselves always.
    We also have good nurses who offer to pitch in and restart IV's that go bad, or give pain meds while you're stuck in a room, etc. And I remember them fondly when they have a bad night.
    While I sincerely feel (ignorantly) that I treat all patients and co-workers equally, it sideswipes me when an aide complains that I don't help. It equally sidewipes me when I enter a pt. room first time that night and they exclaim, "Oh! "bbqchick", I am so glad you are back! You're the only nurse who seems to really care and are not here just for the job!" I know we have other caring nurses. I wonder if I am sacrificing my organizational goals for overdoing for pt's and letting aides walk on me? And, more freq I get my charting done by shift end now.
    But, it seems like more nights than others now, we have too high of acuity which doesn't matter when calls come for a bed. The other night, I was at the end of my coping ability, fully frustrated told the caller that I had to refuse the patient r/t understaffing. Supervisor called in microminute and loudly proclaimed that I could not refuse the patient and we were not understaffed. It's true that our nurse patient ratio agreed with the number shuffle but our 15 patients with three nurses (one new grad still on orientation) and one aide on a step-down unit felt like twice as many patients, the nurse aide started bawling at least once that night. One patient should have been in ICU- septic, cdiff, TPN, DM, decub and huge man, total care on a mask with prn suction.
    I don't see how nurses get everything done in time and can sit and gossip and read mags.
    I know I'm a dumb cluck and also can't stand to hear a light go off and let it ring. Oh well...I self-speak that the running is keeping my leg blood circulating and maybe burning calories? And I try to smile, smile, smile. What a sucker.
  9. by   canoehead
    bbqchick You sound like someone I know, your problems are shared by about a zillion other new grads (and old grads). Hang in there.
  10. by   JennieBSN
    Bbqchick, just READING your post made me tired. I know how you feel, my dear....sometimes you just want to SCREAM.

    Fortunately, most of the folks I work with are really hard workers and compassionate nurses, and we work V-E-R-Y well together. However, tonight was the 2nd night in a row I came home way late because I stayed over to help out the next shift. Last night we had all 'strong' nurses, it was just that census was booming and we had a lot of wild patients (one standing in the middle of her bed screaming, threatening to push on her only 7cm dilated cervix...but that is another thread entirely...). Tonight, it wasn't as busy, but we had 2 'weak' nurses, so it FELT like we were only 1/2 staffed. I called my husband and told him I was coming home late...again. Then limped into my patient's room (cartilage in my hip is dislodged or something....don't understand my own dx...and is pinched between the head of the femur and my hip socket...again, that is another post entirely) to start her IV and load her up with mag to stop her flaming preterm labor.

    Just wanted you to know, you're not alone, sista!! We feel your pain!!! I'll now have a ceremonial glass of wine in your honor.... Hang in there...it DOES get better.
  11. by   frustratedRN
    we don't seem to have a team at our hospital. While there are some nurses that will answer call lights most will let them ring if they are not theirs or will tell you that YOUR call light is ringing.
    My second night off orientation one of my patients went into respiratory arrest. I was fortunate to have noticed an irregular breathing pattern and notified the house doc immediately.
    I was tied up with this patient for nearly three hours. This left my patient load backed up. I also had a complicated post op who called for morphine every hour and for more things in between. Along with that came two admissions. My call lights were going off like crazy but this patient was so unstable I couldn't leave the room unless the doc was right there. At one point I had to fight with the nursing sup to get a bed in intensive care. she said she had two patients that qualified for the only bed and the other might be more ill than mine. doc picked up the phone, called ICU and told them he was bringing a patient down NOW. that was that.
    and all the while this was going on the other nurses were sitting chatting at the desk. one of them said...im glad thats not my patient.
    im to the point where im not going to help anyone anymore. only those that help me.
    its sad tho because its always the patient that suffers
  12. by   ohbet
    I work in a hospital,mostly long term care,however,we are receiving residents with a higher acuity,which brings in more money.

    With the higher acuity resident,more skill is required,skills that I havent used for say 10 years. I want to get into a more skilled clinical nursing but am rusty.

    I have asked the inservice for a refresher orientation on specific skills ,as well as code drills for our hospital staff but I havent got the inservice that I requested.

    Does any one have any ideas on what other steps I can take to this inservice started?
  13. by   longforseaair
    canoehead and kday,
    It really does help to know someone hears and knows. I chose nursing as a second career because the not-so-many nurses I knew were such great people. And because in other work situations I failed to engage in all the monkey-business and was usually unhappy. I often saw through people and didn't always stroke everybody the right way, because it be so denigrating. Oh well!
    Now, I see nurses who are mean, or don't care and am disillusioned again. Oh well, again.
    I look for a mentor and there are none I would trust, and some who would volunteer, but who already find fault with any little thing they can already, to the point that other co-workers encourage me to tell them to take the big flying leap!
    I didn't know I was so naive to think that nursing would be fun, because everybody would be caring.
    It's the most stressful and demanding thing I have ever done. And I can relate to the aching hips and sometimes after working so many shifts in a row, I lay on the couch for at least one full day and just feel ill myself.
    One recent night, when they kept calling for beds and floated our only aide to another floor. I tried very hard to shut out the thoughts that admin or whoever honestly didn't care about anyone, about anyone's health or that they were stretching us so far until everything broke or someone died and they would roll us out of the way and wave new staff and new patients in, and it is only about filling beds as full and as often as possible.
    Why don't they just go back to using prostitutes and criminals as nurses. I wonder how those nurses would respond when the patient got mad because they called for a soft drink fifteen minutes ago, while you were scrambling with resp distress or some such, and you hadn't eaten or emptied your bladder for ten hours.
    It scares me that I have only been a nurse a short while and feel like I'm getting burned out already.

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