How do you stop bad habits? - page 3

I am very embarrassed to admit that I am a smoker. I have been for many years. I am really concerned about my health, but, I dont know how to break the habit. I have tried the nicoderm... Read More

  1. by   Jo Dirt
    I have never smoked but my sisters all do (two have quit and the other says she doesn't want to quit) I honestly don't know how they quit, but I assume it was cold turkey.

    Cigarrette smoke is horrible, and no matter how clean a person is, the smell of cigarettes ruins it. I work on an office where EVERYONE smokes (and people in the health care field at that!) I love my co-workers and I don't think I'd find a better group of people to work with, but the office reeks and I have to take a shower and wash my hair every night. Not to mention the headaches and the ill effect it no doubt has on my health. In fact, it has kept me from going to the office like I should. I may be viewed as a slacker when it comes to coming to the office but the truth is, I can't take the cigarrettes.

    I wish I knew how to help you. We all have crutches. Mine is junk food. Don't feel bad. it's not a personality defect. You aren't struggling with anything millions of others aren't struggling with.
  2. by   ginger58
    Quote from loriannlpn
    I am very embarrassed to admit that I am a smoker. I have been for many years. I am really concerned about my health, but, I dont know how to break the habit.
    I have tried the nicoderm patches 25 mg/24 hr... but, the dreams are very vivid and troublesome. Can anyone help? Give advise on how to quit smoking once and for all? :selfbonk:
    The people I know that have quit smoking have done the best cold turkey. Also, we put our patches on patients at 0900 and take them off at bedtime for the reasons you mention. Best luck.
  3. by   chuchie
    This is a good thread! As of next week, I will have not smoked for four months! For me, the first 72 hours are hell and then it got easier every week. I avoided coffee (switched to green tea) and alcohol as well as dumped all of the ashtrays, cleaned out my car, and threw away all of my lighters. I had tried to quit several times (smoked at least one pack every day since I was 16, now am 20) and back in July when I was on vacation visiting family and friends, I had the MOTHER of all hangovers and quit cold turkey (and I've had my fair share of hangovers...not that I'm proud or anything.) Having a cigarette can be associated with many moods just like eating can. When you are stressed, you have a smoke, when you are angry, you smoke, when you are at a party and with other people that smoke...you smoke. The hardest, for me, was when I was stressed. Anytime that I got really stressed out and that little voice in the back of my head begged me for a cigarette I would say to myself (and sometimes outloud!) "STOP!" I would then immediatly occupy myslef with something else like, going for a quick walk, calling one of my friends, cleaning my room, etc. The key is to make yourself distracted when you are having a really strong craving, even if you are really forcing it. It is GREAT to be free from the habit. I no longer have to worry when I'm running out of cigs and waste my money. Plus, there is such a social stigma attached to smoking. I think there are smokers that feel pretty much 100% comfortable smoking in public regardless of what people think, but then there are smokers like me who would worry if I was smoking by a little kid, pregnant mother, or would not smoke because I was fearful that I would have to hear comments from non-smokers. One more note that I would like to make is that healthy habits are contagious! Since I have quit (and with NO lectures or "I wish I never started" drama stories) I have had two co-workers, one friend, and my brother seriously work on quitting, which is so amazing. My heart goes out to anybody out there that is trying to quit smoking. Next time you smoke, really ask yourself "Why am I doing this?" "Is this alleviating my stress levels?" Good luck to eveyone!
    Last edit by chuchie on Nov 1, '06
  4. by   Multicollinearity
    I've never smoked. Call me crazy, but I've never understood why there are no inpatient programs for patients to go cold turkey. Isn't nicotine as physiologically addictive as some illegal drugs? Going cold turkey while inpatient - you could be given all sorts of pharmaceuticals to ease your agony. Then as that eases, you could address the psychological addiction. Then be discharged. How long does the physiological part of nicotine withdrawal last? Could this be done in 7-14 days? I know it would be horrendously expensive. But so is dying of lung cancer, COPD meds, disability payments, etc.
  5. by   SimonJester
    The first time I quit cold turkey it was a nightmare... I was miserable, I would wake up in the middle of the night shaking uncontrollably, I was moody as all get out and unable to concentrate on anything else… Ultimately within days I would be back smoking…
    As for inpatient care there are otc drugs (the patch) you can get… Again it made the world of difference…
    I agree with chuchie dealing with stress was the worst… But over time it got easier…

    Earlier in the year my state passed a ban on smoking in public building such as restaurants and bars… Nothing ruins your meal like some one smoking…
  6. by   selaz
    Quote from Gompers
    I've heard that hypnotherapy is a good way to quit smoking. I know several people who had ONE session, years ago, and haven't had a cigarette since. So you are physically going cold turkey, but psychologically your mindset is different.
    I just went to a hypnotist 2 weeks ago to quit smoking. I have tried to quit in the past and can honestly say that this has been the smoothest ever. In the past smoking cessation attempts, the moodiness and urges were unbearable, and gum/patches just kept me addicted. After hypnotherapy, I know that something is missing in my life, but my mind does not tie it directly to smoking. I am also less stressed out than before quitting smoking --I feel more relaxed. It takes so much more to rile me up --and this is only two weeks into it. Not bad, huh?
  7. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from Selaz
    I just went to a hypnotist 2 weeks ago to quit smoking. I have tried to quit in the past and can honestly say that this has been the smoothest ever. In the past smoking cessation attempts, the moodiness and urges were unbearable, and gum/patches just kept me addicted. After hypnotherapy, I know that something is missing in my life, but my mind does not tie it directly to smoking. I am also less stressed out than before quitting smoking --I feel more relaxed. It takes so much more to rile me up --and this is only two weeks into it. Not bad, huh?
    I agree. Hypnosis is the way to go! I had tried many different methods, and had unpleasant reactions with all of them until I had one session of hypnosis. No more smoking, no stress or mood problems, and not only no weight gain, but a gradual decline to a more healthful weight. Win, Win, Win!
  8. by   katlynn
    I quit smoking over a year ago, after smoking for many years. I got so sick of the constant worrying about what I was doing to myself, what people thought, the cost, the smell, the embarrassment, that one day, I just quit! Anyone can do it; I know it's hard, but it's definitely doable. The worst part is the fear of wondering what it's going to be like, and if you're actually going to be able to handle the withdrawal, both physical and psychological. You'll miss it, you'll get a bit grouchy, and if you're like me, you'll even gain some weight, because for the first few weeks, I ate. I ate a lot! I gave myself permission to eat whatever and whenever I wanted, because that helped me get over my addiction. And that's okay because if you gain a little weight, you can take it off once you have a handle on your quit. I also got so much unbelievable help from an online forum similar to this one, but for people who are or who have quit smoking. It was the best thing I could have done and I am still quit, and perfectly fine and happier than I've ever been that I no longer go to bed at night wondering if I'm going to die of a smoking related illness or walk around with an oxygen tank because I wouldn't stop smoking. I can't stand the smell of them now. And the relief I feel is just..amazing.
    You can do it, and you'll be shocked at how quickly the time passes after the first month. The first week is the hardest, and it's still not so hard that you can't do it. If it was, there wouldn't be any quitters
    http://forums.about.com/n/pfx/forum....ab-quitsmoking
    is the forum where I found the most help. It will help you, the people there will help you.
    You can do it!
  9. by   Gompers
    Congrats to Selaz and Retired R.N. on quitting smoking with hypnosis!!! I don't smoke, but I've thought about being hypnotized to help lose weight. I've heard it doesn't work quite as well as smoking cessation, but you never know and it's worth a try. Though I did hear one horror story: There was a woman who loved popcorn - ate it all day long, with lots of butter and salt. She went to a hypnotist who left a post-hypnotic suggestion that associated popcorn with vomit! So whenever she saw or even thought about popcorn, she was overwhelmed with the image of vomit and never ate the stuff again.
  10. by   selaz
    Quote from loriannlpn
    I am very embarrassed to admit that I am a smoker. I have been for many years. I am really concerned about my health, but, I dont know how to break the habit.
    I have tried the nicoderm patches 25 mg/24 hr... but, the dreams are very vivid and troublesome. Can anyone help? Give advise on how to quit smoking once and for all? :selfbonk:
    By the way, Loriannlpn, I still haven't started smoking again. I responded to your thread about a month ago to tell you that I tried hypnotherapy and it worked. It's still working (even though I want to eat everything in sight)! I haven't looked back to those darn cigarettes!
  11. by   dmarie (GA)
    I totally understand the struggle to quit smoking! I don't even LIKE to smoke anymore! Yet, strangely, I continue to do it. I can even hear myself wheezing now, especially at night. It's a horrible thing. I'm terrified of gaining more weight if I quit! I'm in nursing school and I've already gained weight as it is!!! Maybe I'll try the hypnosis thing? I've heard the new smoking shot is good too........
  12. by   all4schwa
    Quote from larry77
    i was a smoker for over 10 years and quit during my first quarter of nursing school. i tried to quit probably 30 times before it finally worked--always cold turkey. my biggest problem was going out for a few beers because this was the only time i really "liked" to smoke. the last time i quit smoking i just quit drinking also...well for probably 6 months anyway.

    i agree that cold turkey is the best way to go. i always quit when i would get my annual bronchitis (haven't had it since i quit btw). just keep trying and train yourself to hate the habit and the control it has over you. i think it would probably be easier for me to quit now because it is becoming more and more inconvenient to smoke (in my state no smoking in any public place--even bars).
    i could have written this exact post myself. i smoked for 10 years, bronchitis that lasted months at a time. refused to believe it was all attributed to smoking. i'm young, i see everyone around me smoking...it can't be killing me. i'm grateful everyday that ive been able to quit and haven't been sick once.
    quit 1st quarter of nursing school, quit drinking for about 6mos, wouldnt, couldn't go near a bar....like the man said i liked smoking too much.
    the freedom from smoking program at lungusa.org helped me the most. especially spoke to the nurse side of me!
  13. by   RobCPhT
    Chantix is the new med that is growing in popularity. We have had great results in LTC. If you have medical insurance with your employer they usually have cessation programs for you.

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