Floored by unemployment during shortage

  1. A year ago I took a job at a nursing home. Three months after starting the facility was placed on stop placement by the state. Several employees were arrested for outright abuse. They progressively went down hill and a mass exodus ensued. I chose to stay out of concern for my patients. They all had preferences that I knew and I wanted to make sure that the new people coming in were aware of these preferences. With a poor quality of life to begin with these peoples little preferences made their lifes a little better. Towards the end of my employment as weekend charge (doubles Sat. and Sun.) the mass exodus had left us with 3-4 staff members for 60+ residents. When emploring my superiors for help I was often unable to reach them or got a reply of "that's not my problem". Yes! They said exactly that! I was also left with inadequate supplies and the key to central supply went home with the secretary. I was scared to death for my license and the residents. The last two weeks of my employment I refused to clock in until I had keys to central and a staff of at least 6. This upset management to the point to that after my resignation I was given the status of not rehireable. Even after sticking it out with the facility through bad times. Due to this bad reference I am now finding it difficult to find employment even after telling my side of the situation. Because I've been out of a hospital for three years no hospitals will hire me even with an excellent reference from the pediatric hospice I worked with for two years prior to the nursing home nightmare. I just can't belive that with the shortage I've been unemployed for two months. If there is help or ideas out there please let me know.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   myda922
    SORRY TO HEAR ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE! I DONT THINK I WOULD HAVE DONE IT. DID U EVER CONSIDER TRAVELING? IM NOT A TRAVELING NURSE BUT I HAVE WORKED WITH MANY & THEY SEEM HAPPY, ITS WORTH A TRY. GOOD LUCK
  4. by   oramar
    Originally posted by cannie:
    A year ago I took a job at a nursing home. Three months after starting the facility was placed on stop placement by the state. Several employees were arrested for outright abuse. They progressively went down hill and a mass exodus ensued. I chose to stay out of concern for my patients. They all had preferences that I knew and I wanted to make sure that the new people coming in were aware of these preferences. With a poor quality of life to begin with these peoples little preferences made their lifes a little better. Towards the end of my employment as weekend charge (doubles Sat. and Sun.) the mass exodus had left us with 3-4 staff members for 60+ residents. When emploring my superiors for help I was often unable to reach them or got a reply of "that's not my problem". Yes! They said exactly that! I was also left with inadequate supplies and the key to central supply went home with the secretary. I was scared to death for my license and the residents. The last two weeks of my employment I refused to clock in until I had keys to central and a staff of at least 6. This upset management to the point to that after my resignation I was given the status of not rehireable. Even after sticking it out with the facility through bad times. Due to this bad reference I am now finding it difficult to find employment even after telling my side of the situation. Because I've been out of a hospital for three years no hospitals will hire me even with an excellent reference from the pediatric hospice I worked with for two years prior to the nursing home nightmare. I just can't belive that with the shortage I've been unemployed for two months. If there is help or ideas out there please let me know.
    A friend of mine once made this statement to me about nursing managment , she said "the more you do for them the more they BEEP you". I am sure after what you have been through you know what the beep stands for.
  5. by   Phantom2U
    There are plenty of nursing jobs out there. When you turn in your resume you do not need to explain that they put you on the non rehire list. I would tell them where you worked and if its local most places are going to know why you no longer work for them--they went out of business.
    They may be concerned with your nursing skills, more so than anything. Prior to them checking your references impress them. I would go to the interview and stress what you know inservices youv'e taken pts you helped etc. I wouldn't say that you demanded 6 on before you would agree to work.
  6. by   Joankim
    I would not go into any of the details regarding the things you have goen throght at the nursing home. Rather, just state you are looking for a more acute setting, or something just as vague. The majority if places do not really even check into references, and the places that do check can only obtain information such as dates of employment. Your experience is valuable to many places and you should be able to find work in med surg, or an extended care floor in a hospital, but recruiters do become leary when you give too much information. I have found through experience that less is best when it comes to offering information about previous employment and why you have chosen to leave. They do not want to hear that you were unhappy with managemnt, staffing ratios etc. They want to hear that you are ambitious and anxious to work hard.
  7. by   iamme457
    Present yourself in a positive manner, all facilities are suffering from unhappy staff. If you tell of negative feelings and negative past experiences you may be viewed as a future problem employee.
    You dont have to expand on the bad employer experience.
    Sell yourself, tell the interviewer what you can do for the facility you are applying to.
    Also try working for a medical staffing agency and do some staffing at various hospitals and nursing homes, maybe you can find one you like.
    I quit a hospital job to work at a closer facility that I found by working some extra hours with a nursing agency.
    good luck
  8. by   oramar
    Originally posted by oramar:
    Originally posted by cannie:
    A year ago I took a job at a nursing home. Three months after starting the facility was placed on stop placement by the state. Several employees were arrested for outright abuse. They progressively went down hill and a mass exodus ensued. I chose to stay out of concern for my patients. They all had preferences that I knew and I wanted to make sure that the new people coming in were aware of these preferences. With a poor quality of life to begin with these peoples little preferences made their lifes a little better. Towards the end of my employment as weekend charge (doubles Sat. and Sun.) the mass exodus had left us with 3-4 staff members for 60+ residents. When emploring my superiors for help I was often unable to reach them or got a reply of "that's not my problem". Yes! They said exactly that! I was also left with inadequate supplies and the key to central supply went home with the secretary. I was scared to death for my license and the residents. The last two weeks of my employment I refused to clock in until I had keys to central and a staff of at least 6. This upset management to the point to that after my resignation I was given the status of not rehireable. Even after sticking it out with the facility through bad times. Due to this bad reference I am now finding it difficult to find employment even after telling my side of the situation. Because I've been out of a hospital for three years no hospitals will hire me even with an excellent reference from the pediatric hospice I worked with for two years prior to the nursing home nightmare. I just can't belive that with the shortage I've been unemployed for two months. If there is help or ideas out there please let me know.
    A friend of mine once made this statement to me about nursing managment , she said "the more you do for them the more they BEEP you". I am sure after what you have been through you know what the beep stands for.
    Dear Cannie, I just read what I posted here early and I must apologize. What I said was true but not very helpful or theraputic. You sound like a excellent nurse and a great person. The thing that made me so sour was the hour I had just spent with a hysterical friend who is having problems similar to yours. Guess what? She just told me she got a job at an instituion where she worked a few years ago and where they thought very highly of her. This made me think of the statement you made about good references from a hospice, is there any possibility you could go back there?


    [This message has been edited by oramar (edited September 29, 2000).]
  9. by   Mijourney
    Hi Cannie,
    In regards to the issue about the negative rating by the nursing home, I might consider legal consult if I felt my rights were violated in some way. I don't know. I'd like to see what other posters have to say on this. It seems unfair to ban you from rehire unless there were poor patient outcomes directly due to your care. I agree with the posters on your followup. While you're looking, have you considered continuing ed courses? Have you completed an ACLS or critical care course? Do you have a resume? The placement center from your local college or university should be able to provide some assistance in this area if you need it. Best wishes.
  10. by   bluesgirl
    Originally posted by Mijourney:
    Hi Cannie,
    In regards to the issue about the negative rating by the nursing home, I might consider legal consult if I felt my rights were violated in some way. I don't know. I'd like to see what other posters have to say on this. It seems unfair to ban you from rehire unless there were poor patient outcomes directly due to your care. I agree with the posters on your followup. While you're looking, have you considered continuing ed courses? Have you completed an ACLS or critical care course? Do you have a resume? The placement center from your local college or university should be able to provide some assistance in this area if you need it. Best wishes.
    ha ha ha--legal recourse--if no legal recourse then reeducate that woman--- give me a ******** break- Best wishes-from time past over and over and over again--have you tried this?????????????????????????????
  11. by   njdawn
    Do you have to put this institution on your resume? i wouldn't. i was fired from a job because the doc didn't think I cleaned the flex sig, as the glass jar was full of liquid. i did clean it but forgot to rinse the jar. noone called me to ask. I just got a phone call from the secretary one day after working there for a year with no problems. I always knew this doc didn't like me, he was 1 of 4. And the LPN that worked there was an alcoholic. Anyhow, i went the next day and talked to the doc, who said he was sorry for firing me afterwards, but didn't give me my job back. That LPN by the way, who was lazy, came to work 2-3 hrs late everyday, smelled like the bar she worked in during the weekends, well.... she was on the front page of the newspaper for killing her newborn and going to trial. The doc had felt sorry for her and was helping her, she disliked me and I didn't like her because I had to pick up her slack. When this trial went on, they called me to ask if I wanted my job back, which i said NO! I had struggled for 2 mos after that looking for a job, trying to pay bills etc and they didn't care about me. I don't put this on my resume, I have other references and feel I don't need to explain myself. And if I have to keep explaining myself just so noone believes me, i'd rather work in Walmart with less stress and worries. Good luck!
  12. by   Mijourney
    Hi bluesgirl. I'm flattered that you took the time to read and respond to my post. You're right, I need to give you a break. Since I've always known I don't have the corner on advice but enjoy offering my version of it, what would you suggest that could help cannine? Perhaps your suggestion could help me and others who may find ourselves in this dilemma. Thanks again.
  13. by   spitfire
    MIJOURNEY,I FIND YOUR POSTS TO BE RIGHT ON THE MARK, ASSERTIVE,ANd WELL THOUGHT OUT. THANKS FOR OFFERING YOUR POINT OF VIEW.MANY POINTS OF VIEW GIVE US A CHANCE TO DECEIDE WHAT IS RIGHT FOR US OR GIVES US ANOTHER PROSPECTIVE WE MIGHT NOT OF THOUGHT ABOUT.ISN'T THIS THE PLACE TO BE OFFERING OUR VIEWS, DO WE NEED TO HAVE THESE CRITIQUED? I DON'T THINK SO. spitfire
  14. by   Mijourney
    Originally posted by spitfire:
    MIJOURNEY,I FIND YOUR POSTS TO BE RIGHT ON THE MARK, ASSERTIVE,ANd WELL THOUGHT OUT. THANKS FOR OFFERING YOUR POINT OF VIEW.MANY POINTS OF VIEW GIVE US A CHANCE TO DECEIDE WHAT IS RIGHT FOR US OR GIVES US ANOTHER PROSPECTIVE WE MIGHT NOT OF THOUGHT ABOUT.ISN'T THIS THE PLACE TO BE OFFERING OUR VIEWS, DO WE NEED TO HAVE THESE CRITIQUED? I DON'T THINK SO. spitfire
    Thanks for getting my back spitfire. I agree, it would be great if we could all agree all the time. However, in a public forum like this, I think that it is expected that there will be a convergence and divergence of views. Many nurses come on here to simply let their hair down and may or may not have an additional agenda. They may or may not regularly express bitterness, concern, disappointment, frustration and the like. When a nurse(s)comes on this bb with a slightly different perspective or approach, this person is going to be subjected to, at best, "polite" criticism. One of my priorities on this bb is not to get totally caught up in expressing only a negative attitude regarding nursing and nursing practice which seems to be very attractive to a large number of posters but to be able to point out my version of positives along with the realities of it. I'm sure it did not help that I injected the fact that I entered nursing as a calling. Again, that is a perspective that differs with the mainstream. If I wrote that I chose nursing because it was a calling, I don't think it would have been any different. I will acknowledge that after years in nursing, I don't have the level of idealism I once had. I do still support the ideas upon which nursing was founded but realize that priorites have changed over the years. In most circumstances, it's what the nurse makes out of it.
    Njdawn, I agree that cannie (sorry for the earlier mispelling) should consider leaving off the NH on the application especially if she/he did not work there for any length of time.



    [This message has been edited by Mijourney (edited October 03, 2000).]

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