Doing Without a P.O. Med Nurse - HELP!!!! - page 4

by soundsLikesirens 3,298 Views | 33 Comments

I have recently returned to nursing after a 7-year absence. I've been on a busy med-surg/oncology unit for 3 and a half months now, and when I first began, it was great. Of course, I was learning (still am), but when I started,... Read More


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    Quote from soundsLikesirens
    Venting??? You want VENTING? Passing PO meds is enough to drive me insane! I described it to my husband the other day...you think, well, I only have 2 little pills to give her - how much time can it take? Ha! You go in with the pills...well of course, they have to be repositioned/scooted up in bed, which sometimes takes the aid of another, and no one can be found...once you get them up in the bed, you reach for the water only to discover that THERE IS NONE. First trip to the pantry, to fetch water and ice, cups, etc. You get in there with it all and attempt to give the meds...well they have to fish it out of the medicine cup, which takes a while...they manage to find their mouth and rather than let you give them the water, they insist on holding it...only problem is, they're shaking uncontrollably...shake, shake....spill, spill...a gown change/bed change/who knows. Then once its in their mouth, you give the water......but hey, it didn't go down...another drink, and another...once they get a sure-enough lip-lock on that straw, they drink like a camel, as though they hadn't had water in 2 or 3 days.............then once the pill dilemna is over, you cannot leave the room - they need a blanket - trip to clean utility - they need the heat adjusted...they need to go to the bathroom....they need...THEY NEED!!!!!!!!!!!


    Perfect picture of a busy day. All so very true. Why can't family (when visit) help out a little. Think nurses have to do every single thing, even the smallest things.


    I had to assist a patient to BSC and after a bm, her husband was going to help...then the daughter told him to let me do it since that is what I get paid to do. How I wanted to tell her a few words! I replied no, I get paid for much more. Family members are a huge part of why I don't want to work the floor. Thinking about some things irritate me so much, I would have loved the chance to say a few words.
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    oh do I know the frustration of passing po meds. I feel your pain. I do know how you are feeling. You want to jump out of your skin and just scream. Every time you feel that you are done, patient/resident needs something more done. You can't just walk away.

    I have had to pass meds for 2 halls, one of those an acute care wing. Many of the meds had to be crushed, put in applesauce..I had to do accuchecks, our CNA's are not allowed to do them. Plus we give the insulin and try to juggle all this on the time alloted. One time a nurse was written up for running 5 minutes late on her med pass..and the administrator was the one that wrote her up! She was doing the best she could with all the phone calls that evenings has to answer, family coming in asking questions, telephone orders, new admits, etc. It is enough to make you scream.
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    Venting??? You want VENTING? Passing PO meds is enough to drive me insane! I described it to my husband the other day...you think, well, I only have 2 little pills to give her - how much time can it take? Ha! You go in with the pills...well of course, they have to be repositioned/scooted up in bed, which sometimes takes the aid of another, and no one can be found...once you get them up in the bed, you reach for the water only to discover that THERE IS NONE. First trip to the pantry, to fetch water and ice, cups, etc. You get in there with it all and attempt to give the meds...well they have to fish it out of the medicine cup, which takes a while...they manage to find their mouth and rather than let you give them the water, they insist on holding it...only problem is, they're shaking uncontrollably...shake, shake....spill, spill...a gown change/bed change/who knows. Then once its in their mouth, you give the water......but hey, it didn't go down...another drink, and another...once they get a sure-enough lip-lock on that straw, they drink like a camel, as though they hadn't had water in 2 or 3 days.............then once the pill dilemna is over, you cannot leave the room - they need a blanket - trip to clean utility - they need the heat adjusted...they need to go to the bathroom....they need...THEY NEED!!!!!!!!!!!
    LOL -- you are describing this to a T. I work on a stroke floor which can sometimes be more like a LTC facility and this is exactly how it is -- everyday. Except today I had one who did not want to take her pills. She wanted to refuse everything because it made her sick. I mean ... I was about to go out of my MIND.
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    Quote from soundsLikesirens
    The people "in charge" know that all the nurses are going nuts...their "philosophy" is that it's "better" for the po meds to be given by the nurse, since we know what's going on with them....(supposedly)...and that it increases the time spent in bedside nursing...this is alot of bull and I think it's a smokescreen for them just trying to cut the budget.
    One of my first jobs as a nurse was passing out PO medication. I was responsible for two halls that housed a total of 64 patients. Even if you counted an hour leeway, Administration can do the math as well as anyone else; it couldn't be done within legitimate boundaries. I quit after two days of it and would never work for that particular company again. $$ is the deciding factor in budgeting staff; it makes all the difference in whether the DON gets their annual bonus or not and in some cases it is the deciding factor in whether a facility keeps its current DON.


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