Does anyone double-glove? - page 2

As a new nursing student, I am curious if any one double-gloves when doing something that will expose them to a lot of body fluids. Obviously, gloves break often and I'm wondering what you do to... Read More

  1. by   julieK
    Quote from suzanne4
    Read closely what I wrote in my post, I always at least have on a single pair of gloves, and many times they are in fact double. I was explaining how things have changed since I became a nurse,, which was a very long time ago. I am probably more protected than many other nurses that I know, I will not hesitate to use goggles or eye shields for any procdeure, etc., as well as a mask, when many others would not.

    It's not about who is more protected. The idea is that the universal precautions should protect us from anyone and anything, no matter who the patient. I just take exception to relying on "instints" when deciding to double-glove or not because no human instinct can diagnose an infectious, blood-borne pathogen.

    -Julie
  2. by   suzanne4
    Quote from julieK
    It's not about who is more protected. The idea is that the universal precautions should protect us from anyone and anything, no matter who the patient. I just take exception to relying on "instints" when deciding to double-glove or not because no human instinct can diagnose an infectious, blood-borne pathogen.

    -Julie
    If you read the literature on the gloves, you will find that you may not be as protected as you think with them. I am always at least single-gloved, and most of the time double gloved when doing any type of invasive procedure.

    Unfortunately, not all nurses follow universal precautions..........even though they are supposed to ..................they complain about gloves not fitting right when they try to start an IV, I use two pairs and have no problem.
  3. by   stressednurse
    Yes I double glove for suppositories and suctioning and usually dressing changes. If the procedure takes more than 5 minutes I usually reglove.
    In my opinion everyone has everything imagined and things we don't know about.
    Gloves are cheap.
  4. by   LoriChr
    It depends on what I am doing. For certain procedures I will double glove.
    I notice a lot of HCW's, physicians and nurses alike, don't wash their hands when they remove their gloves. Not only do we learn to wash our hands before and after donning gloves, it just seems like another way to be safe.
  5. by   DMoon
    Same subject, completely different track--

    I do a lot of field work and also trauma in the ER, and I sometimes double and triple glove--when the top set gets too gross I strip it off to the clean set below--saves time in re-gloving plus I hate trying to get fresh gloves on over sweaty hands! Always on one patient, obviously. New patient=completely new set of gloves.

    Thanks for all the discussion on infection control, too. I always learn good stuff on this forum!
  6. by   Jailhouse RN
    If you double glove w sterile golves, are they sterile? The answer is a simple no. If it is with nonsterile gloves for routine things then do it if it makes you happy.
  7. by   PA-C in Texas
    If you use sterile technique to don them, of course they would be sterile. Surgeons do it all the time, and the contact surfaces of both pairs remain sterile.
  8. by   RedSox33RN
    This is an interesting thread.

    I've asked my endo and a few others, but I'd be interested in knowing what practicing RN's thought.

    I'm an insulin-dependent diabetic, and test my b.s. on my fingers 7-10x a day. So I ALWAYS have an open wound on my fingers, even if they are not actively bleeding.

    I was thinking long before nursing school, which I start next month, that I should always double-glove - for everything. No questions asked, to always try to protect myself, but also the patient (even though I know I'm "clean") should any of my prick sites start oozing (though this very rarely happens. Most of my prick site stop bleeding after 60 sec. of pressure).

    My endo said as long as I practice universal precautions, I don't need to double-glove. I disagree, and WILL double-glove, mostly as peace-of-mind for myself and patients.

    Any thoughts? Am I being ridiculous - Is it too much to do all the time?
  9. by   boggle
    A very interesting topic! I'm all for proper protective equipment, but want the "proper" to be evidence based, not fear based.

    After reading this thread through, I did some searching for more info on when and why double gloving would be necessary. I tried both the Center for Disease Control and OSHA, but could not find any specific info about double gloving. I found lots of general guidelines about wearing gloves, but not the specific info about double gloving that I was looking for.

    I did find some information at this site:

    http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com.../051feat3.html

    The article discussed double gloving during surgery, where the handling of instruments led to a higher incidence of holes in gloves. Their conclusion was that double gloving was safer in surgery. This study and their conclusions did not address the non-sterile gloving we do as we give bedside care.
    With that study in mind, I would think that double gloving at the bedside would be safer if there is manipulation of abrasive material or instruments that could snag or tear the gloves. But for general use, no.

    Does anyone have data to support the use of double instead of single gloving for universal precautions?

    I always want to know why. And "because we've always done it that way" just makes me ask "why?" more .
  10. by   suzanne4
    Quote from boggle
    A very interesting topic! I'm all for proper protective equipment, but want the "proper" to be evidence based, not fear based.

    After reading this thread through, I did some searching for more info on when and why double gloving would be necessary. I tried both the Center for Disease Control and OSHA, but could not find any specific info about double gloving. I found lots of general guidelines about wearing gloves, but not the specific info about double gloving that I was looking for.

    I did find some information at this site:

    http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com.../051feat3.html

    The article discussed double gloving during surgery, where the handling of instruments led to a higher incidence of holes in gloves. Their conclusion was that double gloving was safer in surgery. This study and their conclusions did not address the non-sterile gloving we do as we give bedside care.
    With that study in mind, I would think that double gloving at the bedside would be safer if there is manipulation of abrasive material or instruments that could snag or tear the gloves. But for general use, no.

    Does anyone have data to support the use of double instead of single gloving for universal precautions?

    I always want to know why. And "because we've always done it that way" just makes me ask "why?" more .
    To pass inspection, gloves are permitted to have holes up to 5 microns, which or course, you cannot see with the naked eye. The AIDS virus is 0.5 microns. The idea of the double gloves is that if there is a hole, the holes will not line up and you will be protected. In the OR, I always wear double gloves. You are free to choose what ever you want to do..........
    You do the math. I have never had a needle stick in my entire career, but I am going to protect myself the same way that I have done since I heard of this.
  11. by   boggle
    Thanks for the reply, Suzanne. Does that 5 micron standard apply to all gloves for medical use? Is that an international or OSHA standard? I'm interested to see if any manufacturer's products exceed that standard.
    I'll keep looking for more info.
  12. by   MishlB
    Quote from ksfrn66
    I only double glove if I am taking care of a patient who I KNOW has hepatitis or AIDS. I have had plenty of box gloves rip at my hospital. The risk of a HCW getting HIV/AIDS is 0.47% even with a needlestick (CDC). Universal precautions helps as well...I teach my students to treat every patient as if they are infectious.
    And how do you know if they do or they don't?? That's why "universal precautions" right?
  13. by   Rnn2003
    [font=Comic Sans MS]I always double glove when I get a chance to scrub. I like to know that if I am doing a case I have that extra protection for myself. And many of our patient Dr really love to wait while you change your gloves and then glove them:chuckle

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